Skip to navigation – Site map
Comptes rendus

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colourblindness, The New Press, 2012, 304 p., ISBN 978-1595586438.

David Mansley
p. 304

Excerpt

Full text document will be published online on December 2018.

First lines

Among social historians of law there is currently a keen interest in popular legalism, i.e. in the active role that ordinary people played in the judiciary and how these people experienced the law. These new strands of research takes the view that ordinary people were not necessarily the victims of legal regimes imposed upon them from above. Instead, historians increasingly highlight the ways in which ordinary people shaped the judiciary. This historiographical shift includes growing attention to low-threshold forms of conflict arbitration, such as summary courts. These were the legal institutions that people from all walks of life were most likely to interact with.

Both volumes discussed in this review align with these new strands in historical research. The volume edited by David Lemmings comprises a range of articles that discuss why thre was an ‘explosion’ of popular trial publishing in London and Scotland during the eighteenth century, particularly focusing on how such practices...

Top of page

References

Bibliographical reference

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colourblindness, The New Press, 2012, 304 p., ISBN 978-1595586438.

Electronic reference

David Mansley, « Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colourblindness, The New Press, 2012, 304 p., ISBN 978-1595586438. », Crime, Histoire & Sociétés / Crime, History & Societies [Online], Vol. 20, n°2 | 2016, Online since 01 December 2018, connection on 26 February 2018. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/chs/1680

Top of page

About the author

David Mansley

Top of page

Copyright

© Droz

Top of page
  • OpenEdition Journals