Skip to navigation – Site map

10th Annual Global Development Conference. Natural resources en development. Feb 1-5, 2009. Kuwait

Global Development Network

The Global Development Network (GDN) is a leading International Organization working with developing country researchers and policy research institutes to support the generation and sharing of world-class policy-relevant research on development, helping to strengthen capacity in the process. Founded in 1999, GDN is headquartered in New Delhi, with offices in Cairo and Washington. GDN works in collaboration with 11 Regional Network Partners (RNPs). Eight RNPs are based in developing countries and three in developed countries. Each RNP links numerous research institutes in its region and facilitates their contact with policymakers. GDN partners with various international donor organizations and Governments, a worldwide network of research institutes, academic institutions, think tanks and more than 7,000 individual researchers worldwide. GDN’s key activities comprise Global Research Projects, Awards & Medals, Annual Conferences, Regional Research Competitions, Strategic Research Partnerships and GDNet (the electronic voice of GDN).

Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development

The Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development (AFESD) is an autonomous regional Pan-Arab development finance organization, whose member states consist of those 22 states of the League of Arab States. The Fund's purpose is to contribute to the financing of economic and social development in Arab countries by making loans on concessionary terms to Arab governments, public enterprises and corporations; and to provide expertise and technical assistance in the various spheres of economic development. AFESD offers a Fellowship program to Arab Ph.D holders. Its purpose is to provide Arab researchers, through grants, with opportunities to conduct research in association with international universities.

2009 Conference Theme: Natural Resources and Development

The aim of this conference is to provide a platform to further the debate on the crucial relationship between natural resources and development.

Natural Resources: The Debate

In the face of imminent challenges to our environment, natural resource management, along with conservation and restoration is becoming a central theme in the development planning objectives of every economy. The condition of a region's natural resources can greatly determine the social and economic sustainability of a community. At the same time, available evidence over the last forty years seems to suggest that on average, countries which are rich in natural resources have had lower growth than their resource poor counterparts and that resource rich economies have low investment rates and very low real savings rates. Plenty of exceptions do exist though and there is also evidence according to which resource abundant countries use resources less efficiently, if their institutions are weak. Dutch disease effects have also been observed in many countries abundant in natural resources. High exports of natural resources cause an appreciation of a country’s real exchange rate, which moves its productive resources away from tradable goods such as manufactured goods. If manufacturing produces significant positive externalities that are crucial for long-term development, such as learning-by-doing, the country’s economic growth rate will suffer. Finally, price volatility in commodity markets has significant implications for primary commodity producers, strongly dependent on export earnings to repay their debts and support their development process. Vulnerability issues arising from the lack of safety nets and compensatory mechanisms during periods of declining prices in important commodity markets are also central in this regard.

Political Economy Aspects

Political economy of natural resources refers to how countries with diverse political systems and institutions use their natural resources. It is an attempt to explain the behavior of groups, organizations and individuals within a country, the logic that motivates them in their decisions to engage into actions that may have an impact on natural resources management. Of relevance here is the political economy of resource rents and the strategic behaviour of individual economic agents. Increases in the availability of resource rents following a boom in the relevant world prices can increase the appetite for resource rents amongst certain individuals or groups within society. This gives rise to the rentier or voracity effect (i.e. a situation in which national budgets based on revenues from the exports of natural resources allow governments to mollify dissent, avoid accountability pressures, and repress opposition movements, independent business groups and civil society organizations) which in turn can lead to diversion from normal productive activities. Local talent and entrepreneurship may be also diverted into unproductive rent seeking. Political economy issues in this area are also associated with the overall nexus between natural resource endowments, institutions and growth. Mineral wealth may prevent the eventual growth enhancing redistribution of political power towards the middle classes, delaying the establishment of the foundations for democracy. It is also broadly agreed that good institutions (including conditions for good institutions, such as democracy or good governance itself) can be the key to future economic progress. Finally, the overall link between natural resources and violent conflict has also attracted a lot of attention. In this regard it is crucial to examine the nature of causation between resource dependence and civil war and whether resource abundance is associated with a reduced probability of the onset of war.

Sustainable Development and Natural Resources

In recent years, sustainable development has emerged as a new paradigm of development, integrating economic growth, social development and environmental protection. Sustainable development refers to economic growth that does not allow the overall natural resource base to deteriorate. However, over the last few decades, rising economic growth rates in most developing countries have contributed to increasing levels of exploitation of natural resources and environment degradation, which unchecked could have detrimental effects on future growth patterns. As theory suggests the inherent problem with all natural resources is that they are mostly either open access or common property resources and hence the cause for mismanagement or exploitation. Sustainable management of natural resources therefore calls for innovative policies that will internalize externalities by establishing markets for natural resources, promoting valuation and inclusion of natural resources in the national accounting process. Linking together climate change and development finance is equally crucial. To reduce emissions and to adapt vulnerable countries to climate change, especially in ways that protect poor people, will need innovative ideas – including innovative finance – and early action. Irrespective of what scheme eventually comes to pass, one trend is clear: an increased linkage between the climate change issue and flows of development finance over the next decade.

Natural Resource Management

Natural resource abundance has often resulted in a curse rather than a blessing, mainly because of poor management of windfall revenues. Fiscal public management is critical in developing countries because it constitutes the base for financing social and development programs. With regard to fiscal management, countries abundant in natural resources face five critical challenges: buffering themselves from excessive short-term revenue volatility, protecting the wider economy, in particular the manufacturing and agriculture sector, from contraction (Dutch disease effects), establishing strong socio-economic institutions for economic and revenue-base diversification, insuring themselves against the long-term decline of revenue due to the likely depletion of resources (inter-temporal fiscal constraint) and ensuring inter-generational equity. The role of expectations is also of importance since agents in the economy may view the ‘windfall shock’ as permanent or temporary and this will clearly affect the fiscal management of the windfall arising from the resource boom. Resource booms have also crucial implications for overall macroeconomic management in resource-rich countries. Finally, the kinds of contracts that a natural resource-rich country enters into with multinational companies to develop its resources can have a great effect on how much revenue the government subsequently receives. In many cases, engaging foreign firms may result in markedly reduced competition, and this in turn leads to lower revenues for the government.

Parallel Sessions

Ten Regional Network Partners have organized eight parallel sessions (two joint sessions) focusing on a broad range of topics such as the costs and benefits of natural resources, issues in sustainable development and environmental challenges for this century.

Four other partners have organized workshops on a new journal initiative for field actors, resource management lessons from country studies, migration, inequality and development and the forthcoming flagship publication of the World Bank, the 2010 World Development Report.

The remainder of the parallel sessions will feature presentations by the finalists of the 2008 GDN Awards and Medals Competition and the Winner of the 2006 Japanese Award for ‘Outstanding Research on Development’.

Workshops

The 2009 GDN conference will be the venue for pre-conference workshops on a variety of research themes including migration, governance, climate change, institutional capacity strengthening, bridging research and policy and the recently launched 3ie Initiative.

  1. 3ie Initiative

  2. Bridging Research and Policy

  3. Climate Change

  4. Development on the Move: Measuring and Optimizing Migration’s Economic and Social Impacts

  5. Institutional Capacity Strengthening of African Public Policy Institutes to Support Inclusive Growth and the MDGs

  6. Varieties of Governance: Effective Public Service Delivery

Business Meetings

The GDN Board of Directors will meet during the annual conference to discuss progress in GDN activities during the last year and provide strategic direction for future activities. Members of the Board of Directors and GDN staff will also hold a series of consultations with our Regional Network Partners (RNPs). The meeting of the GDN Advisory Committee meeting will bring together representatives of agencies supporting GDN’s mission and activities to pro-vide an update on developments in the past year and welcome suggestions on future courses of action.

Pre-Conference Workshops and Meetings

Sunday, February 1, 2009: Pre-Conference Workshops and Business Meetings

8.30 AM - 1.00 PM
Regional Network Partner (RNP) Heads’ and GDN Staff Meeting
Location: Glass Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

9.00 AM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Migration)
Location: Round Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

9.00 AM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Climate Change)
Location: Tunisian Room, Ground Floor, AFESD

9.00 AM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Bridging Research and Policy MENA Forum)
Location: Mamloukeiya Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

9.00 AM – 6.30 PM
3ie High-level Experts’ Meeting
Location: Shirin Banu Meeting Room, Lobby Level, Safir Hotel

1.00 PM – 2.00 PM
Lunch
Location: Atrium, AFESD

2.00 PM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Institutional Capacity Strengthening)
Location: Glass Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

2.00 PM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Governance)
Location: Library, Ground Floor, AFESD

7.30 PM - 9.30 PM
Working Dinner - GDN Board, RNP Heads and GDN staff (by invitation only)
Location: Riccardo Restaurant, Sheraton Hotel

Monday, February 2, 2009: Pre-Conference Workshops and Business Meetings

9.00 AM – 12.30 PM
GDN Board of Directors’ Meeting
Location: Mamloukeiya Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

9.00 AM – 12.30 PM
3ie High-level Experts’ Meeting
Location: Shirin Banu Meeting Room, Lobby Level, Safir Hotel

9.00 AM – 1.00 PM
Overseas Development Institute (ODI) Session
Location: Meeting Room (Seventh Floor), AFESD

12.30 PM – 2.30 PM
Working Lunch - GDN Board, Policy Advisors and GDN Staff (by invitation only)
Location: Glass Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

1.00 – 2.00 PM
Lunch
Location: Atrium, AFESD

9.00 AM – 5.00 PM
Workshop (Enhancing Professional Presentation Skills)
Location: Meeting Room B, Third Floor, Safir Hotel

9.00 AM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Migration)
Location: Round Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

9.00 AM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Climate Change)
Location: Tunisian Room, Ground Floor, AFESD

9.00 AM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Governance)
Location: Library, Ground Floor, AFESD

2.00 PM – 6.30 PM
Workshop (Bridging Research and Policy Donor Forum)
Location: Mamloukeiya Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

2.00 PM – 6.30 PM
First 3ie Members’ Conference
Location: Shirin Banu Meeting Room, Lobby Level, Safir Hotel

6.30 PM – 8.30 PM
Workshop (Climate Change) Video Conference Session
Location: Round Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

7.30 PM – 9.30 PM
Dinner - Board and GDN Staff (by invitation only)
Location: Le Nôtre Restaurant

Main Conference

Tuesday, February 3, 2009: Main Conference Day 1

9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
OPENING (WELCOME) SESSION
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

Chair

Ernesto Zedillo
Chair, GDN Board of Directors andDirector, Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, USA

Opening Remarks

Abdlatif Al-Hamad
Director-General and ChairmanArab Fund for Economic and Social Development, Kuwait

H.E. Mohammed Al-Sabah
Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister
Kuwait

Keynote Speaker

Justin Lin, “Natural Resources, Economic Growth and Future Generations: How to Create a Win-win Outcome for Everyone?
Chief Economist and Sr. Vice President, Development Economics
The World Bank, USA

09.00 AM – 5.00 PM
Workshop (Enhancing Professional Presentation Skills)
Location: Meeting Room B, Third Floor, Safir Hotel

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Tea / Coffee Break

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel A.1:
Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies (OxCarre) and Revenue Watch Joint Session on “Key Decisions for Resource Management; Lessons from Country Experience”
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

The session will present findings from a series of new case studies which examine the performance of countries that have experienced major resource booms. The approach is to look at the key decision points faced by policy makers in these countries and to explore the forces driving the decisions that were taken, and the consequences of the decisions. A number of important decision points are studied. The first is to do with the contracting and fiscal regime under which resource extraction takes place. There are difficult trade-offs to do with ensuring that government take is maximized while at the same time providing incentives for exploration and extraction, sharing risk, and handling problems of asymmetric information and time consistency. The second is to do with spending and saving decisions from resource wealth. How fast have resources been depleted, and have countries spent resource revenue as it accrues or has it been invested, either domestically or abroad? The third is to do with the efficiency and composition of spending. Inefficiencies occur at both the macro-economic level and in the micro-economics of project selection and implementation. All of these decisions are dependent on the institutional structures of the countries concerned and the political economy pressures on government. The session will start with a brief overview of messages from seven country studies, and then present the findings of three of the studies (Cameroon, Kazakhstan and Zambia). They are a heterogeneous set of countries which illustrate problems in contracting with resource companies, in preventing revenue theft, and in the macro-economics of spending resource revenues. The political economy of decision taking is studied and lessons for future decision taking are drawn.

Chair

Paul Collier
Director, Centre for the Study of African EconomiesUniversity of Oxford, UK

Speakers

Karlygash Kuralbayeva, “Kazakhstan: Managing Boom-bust Risks in a Resource-rich Economy” (co-authored with Akram Esanov)
University of Oxford, UK

Anthony Musonda, “Harnessing Resource Revenues for Prosperity in Zambia
University of Cape Town, South Africa

Albert Zeufack, “Oil Revenues in Cameroon: Governance Matters
Director of Research
Khazanah Nasional, Malaysia

Discussant

Anthony J. Venables
BP Professor of Economics & Director of OxCarre
University of Oxford, UK

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel A.2:
Economic Research Forum (ERF) Roundtable on “Natural Resources, Governance and Development”
Location: Round Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

The session will address the links between natural resources, governance and development, focusing on countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). It will draw on the literature and experience on how natural resource endowments and the limited need for taxation impact the nature of governance. In addition, it will explore how the resulting governance structures in natural resource rich countries shape the selection of development policies and thereby distributional outcomes. Finally, the session will draw the implications of the above for the MENA region.

Moderator

Ahmed Galal
RNP Head and Managing DirectorEconomic Research Forum (ERF), Egypt

Speakers

Samir Makdisi
Former Board Member, GDN
Professor of Economics
American University of Beirut, Lebanon

Mustapha K. Nabli
Board Member, GDN
Senior Adviser, Development Economics
The World Bank, USA

Jean-Philippe Platteau
Board Member, GDN & RNP Head, EUDN
Facultés Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Belgium

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel A.3: Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education – Economic Institute (CERGE-EI) and Economic Education and Research Consortium (EERC) Joint Session on “The Economic and Political Benefits and Costs of Natural Resources”
Location: Tunisian Room, Ground Floor, AFESD

Natural Resources bring a diverse set of benefits and costs to a country. At the same time, these costs and benefits often are not divided equally within the country. In this session, we take an interdisciplinary focus on these costs and benefits, from both a micro and macro perspective. Natural resources can bring geopolitical power allowing a country to play a prominent role in the international arena. At the same time, however, they can slow down the development of political and economic institutions and increase the inequality within a country, thus negatively affecting long-term growth. These different effects are illustrated using the recent experience of transition countries.

Moderators

Tom Coupé
RNP Head and Director EERC
Kyiv School of Economics, Ukraine

Randall K. Filer
RNP Head
Central European Coordinator, CERGE-EI, Czech Republic

Speakers

Martha Olcott, “Oil and Gas Geopolitics in Eastern Europe and the CIS
Senior Associate
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, USA

Vladimir Popov, “Instability of Democracy as Resource Curse” (co-authored with Alexander Tonis and Victor Polterovich)
Board Member, GDN
Professor
New Economic School, Russia

Natalia Volchkova, “Human Capital, Industrial Growth and the Resource Curse
Economist
Center for Economic and Financial Research, Russia

Discussants

Thorvaldur Gylfason
Professor of Economics
Faculty of Economics and Business Administration
University of Iceland, Iceland

Sergey Slobodyan
Assistant Professor
CERGE-EI, Czech Republic

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel A.4: Oceania Development Network (ODN) Session on “Natural Resources and  Development in the Pacific Islands”
Location: Mamloukeiya Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

This session will begin by addressing the issue of natural resource rich countries in the Pacific with a particular focus on Melanesia and the issue of natural resource endowment and lack of development. In addition to this, it will discuss the emergence of an embryonic form of pluralism in the negotiation of development projects between local communities and multinational companies as part of the corporate social responsibility commitments in Papua New Guinea. The last paper addresses the importance of understanding deforestation and the development of the Reduced Emission from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) methodology by Pacific Islands to assist with sustainable development.

Chair

Wood Salele
RNP Head, ODN
Dean, Faculty of Business and Entrepreneurship
National University of Samoa, Samoa

Speakers

Benedict Y. Imbun, “Mining, Local Communities and Pluralism in Papua New Guinea
School of Management
University of Western Sydney, Australia

Chalapan Kaluwin, “The Challenges of Reduced Emission, Deforestation and Degradation and Sustainable Development in the Pacific Islands Rainforest Countries
Professor, School of Natural and Physical Sciences
University of Papua New Guinea, Papua New Guinea

Discussants

Albert Mellam
Executive Dean, School of Business Administration
University of Papua New Guinea, Papua New Guinea

Sanjesh Naidu
Economic Adviser
Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat, Fiji Islands

Vijay Naidu
Board Member, GDN
Director, Development Studies and Head, School of Governance and Development Studies
University of the South Pacific, Fiji Islands

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel A.5
: FACTS Reports Journal Session on “A New and Unique Journal and an Instrument at the Service of Field Actors”
Location: Library, Ground Floor, AFESD

The major objective of the FACTS Reports Special Event is to present FACTS Reports and highlight major important issues raised in some of the published papers related to the Natural Resources and Development topic. FACTS Reports is a new and unique forum that will publish manuscripts and opinion pieces related to field-based activities in the areas of economy and development, health, education, agriculture, and the environment. This journal focuses on activities in developing countries and impoverished areas of developed countries. During its first stage, FACTS Reports will primarily cover areas related to economic development and health. The goal of FACTS Reports is to collect, disseminate and capitalize knowledge and best practices on field activities worldwide. Many field actors implement projects in developing countries to address issues related to economics, health, agriculture, education, the environment and development in general. There are many opportunities to learn from the outcomes of these projects. Therefore, the aim of FACTS Reports is to provide a forum for field actors for communicating the results to a broad audience. Moreover, it provides a neutral and independent platform for spreading good practices. This journal is an instrument developed for serving field actors. It allows them to express freely their views and opinions; to exchange experience, and cooperate with other field actors across the world. Additionally, the FACTS Initiative will promote activities such as international conferences, training courses, symposia, and educational awards.

Chair

Philippe Kourilsky
Professor, Collège de France
Honorary Director General, Institut Pasteur, France

Speakers

Nadia Caïd, “Presentation of the FACTS Reports Initiative
Development Director
Veolia Environment Institute, France

Joy E. Hecht, “The COMPASS Project in Malawi: When Will Community Management Really Conserve Biodiversity?
Consultant on Environmental Economics and Policy, USA

Didier Simon, “Fish-farming and Rice-farming Project in Guinea
Senior Economist, Agriculture and Rural Development Division
Agence française de développement, France

Harun Maina Warui, “Implications of Community-based Management of Woody Vegetation Around Sedentarised Pastoral Areas in the Arid Northern Kenya” (co-authored with Mrigesh Kshatriya)
Research Scientist, National Arid Lands Research Centre
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kenya

Discussants

Jean-Claude Berthélemy
Professor of Economics, Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne University
Chief Editor, Economy section of FACTS Reports, France

Kiran B. Chhokar
Programme Director, Higher Education & Editor, Journal of Education for Sustainable Development
Centre for Environment Education, India

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Working Lunch – ‘Friends of GDN’ Group (by invitation only)
Location: Glass Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Lunch
Location: Atrium, AFESD

2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
PLENARY 1: NATURAL RESOURCES: CURSE OR BLESSING?
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

The central questions to be addressed in this session are: Why do natural resources induce growth and prosperity in some countries but stagnation in others? Are natural resources a curse or a blessing? How did successful countries manage to turn the curse into blessing? How can countries abundant in natural resources create stabilization funds that allow the smoothing out of expenditures and ensure that the pattern of expenditures does not give rise to large Dutch disease problems? Is volatility of unanticipated output growth a quintessential feature of the resource curse? How well-developed financial sectors in countries rich in natural resources can weaken the resource curse effect? What are the implications of price volatility in primary commodity markets for countries and households dependant on these markets for growth and prosperity?How resource rich countries can reduce domestic conflicts over access to natural wealth and establish responsible, just and economically productive resource management with equitable distribution of wealth to all stakeholders, in particular local communities? And, finally, how can countries move away from rent seeking equilibrium to more dynamic, diversified and growing economies?

Chair

Andrés Neumeyer
Board Member, GDN
Professor, Department of Economics
Universidad Torcuato di Tella, Argentina

Speakers

Ragnar Torvik, “Why do Some Resource Abundant Countries Succeed While Others do not?
Professor
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway

Rick van der Ploeg, “Volatility, Financial Development and the Natural Resource Curse” (co-authored with Steven Poelhekke)
Professor, Department of Economics
Oxford University, UK

Nora Lustig, “The Curse of Volatile Food Prices: Policy Dilemmas in the Developing World
Shapiro Visiting Professor of International Affairs, George Washington University, USA
Visiting Fellow, Center for Global Development, USA

Discussant

Guillermo Perry
Former Board Member, GDN
Senior Research Associate, Fedesarrollo, Colombia

4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Tea / Coffee Break

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Parallel B.1:
Presentations by Finalists of the 2008 Global Development Awards Competition – Outstanding Research on Development
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

The Japanese Award for “Outstanding Research on Development” carries cash prizes of US$35,000 plus travel expenses to our annual conference. An award of US$30,000 is given to the institution whose proposed research, along the themes of one of our five categories, nholds the greatest promise for improving our understanding of development. One additional prize of US$5,000 is given to the institution of a second finalist to continue work in the chosen research area. Funding for the Award is generously provided by the Ministry of Finance, Government of Japan.

Chair

Beris Gwynne
Director for Global Accountability
World Vision International, USA

Speakers
Lucio Castro
, “Foreign Direct Investment, Institutions and Natural Resources in Space: The Case of Argentina
Director
Center for the Implementation of Public Policies for Growth and Equity (CIPPEC), Argentina

Jorge Maldonado, “Governance and Adaptability of Fishing Communities in a Marine Protected Area in the Colombian Caribbean
Director, Centro de Estudios sobre Desarrollo Económico (CEDE)
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

Gurmeet Singh, “Building Resiliency to Natural Hazards in Pacific Island Communities
Senior Lecturer
University of South Pacific (USP), Fiji Islands

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Parallel B.2:
Presentation by Finalists of the 2008 Global Development Awards Competition – Most Innovative Development Project
Location: Round Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

The Japanese Award for the ‘Most Innovative Development Project’ carries cash prizes of US $35,000 plus travel expenses to our conference. An award of US $30,000 will be given to the institution whose project embodies a fresh approach to an important development need  and holds the greatest promise for benefiting the poor in developing and transition countries. The criteria include the degree of innovation and the potential for broad replication of the project in other countries. An additional prize of US $5,000 is given to the institution of the second finalist. Funding for the Award is generously provided by the Ministry of Finance, Government of Japan. This year, the three finalists represent projects from Nepal, South Africa and Ecuador.

Chair

Kaiichi Tsunekawa
Director
Japan International Cooperation Agency, Japan

Speakers

Bhishma Prasad Subedi, “Biodiversity Conservation Through a Community-based Enterprise Approach
Executive Director
The Asia Network for Sustainable Agriculture and Bioresources (ANSAB), Nepal

Carol Tappenden, “The South African Social Investment Exchange (SASIX)
Managing Director
The Greater Good South Africa Trust, South Africa

Mónica del Rosario Vásconez, “Totally Online High School for People in Educational Risk
Executive Director
The Iberoamerican Virtual Foundation (UVIA), Ecuador

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Parallel B.3:
Presentation by the 2006 Global Development Award Winner
Location: Tunisian Room, Ground Floor, AFESD

This session will involve the presentation of research findings from Ms. Juhua Yang, winner of the Japanese Award for Outstanding Research on Development in 2006. This research project ‘Demographic Change and Poverty of the Elderly in China’ examines the relationship between demographic change and poverty of the elderly in China. The one-child policy, combined with economic progress has generated a reduction of the fertility rate; increased longevity; rapid aging in population and a tremendous population redistribution as well as changes in family structure and living arrangements. Due to the lack of an efficient social security system, this trend has come with an increase of poverty of the elderly. The presentation will highlight the connection between demographic change and poverty among aging populations in China.

Chair

Lyn Squire
First President, GDN
USA

Speaker

Yang Juhua, “Demographic Change and Poverty of the Elderly in China
Professor
Renmin University of China, China

Discussants

Ramgopal Agarwala
Senior Adviser
Research and Information System for Developing Countries (RIS), India

Eswaran Somanathan
Professor
Indian Statistical Institute, India

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Parallel B.4: The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (WIIW) Session on “Migration, Inequality and Development”
Location: Mamloukeiya Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

The transition economies of Southeast Europe show a variety of migration patterns, ranging from the experience of former Yugoslav countries building on permanent guest worker emigration to Western Europe to schemes of temporary and, in particular, repeat migration as well as forced migration in the context of war and human trafficking. Moreover, migration and the flow of remittances are related to issues of income inequality, taxation and public expenditures. This parallel session, organised by The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (WIIW), will present research on migration, inequality and development in the European transition economies with a particular focus on Southeast Europe. The researchers have been selected in the GDN research competition Southeast Europe and have participated in the GDN Global Research Project (GRP) on migration.

Chair

Michael Landesmann
Director of Research
The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (WIIW), Austria

Speakers

Ana Bleahu, “The Determinants of Remittances in Southeast Europe
Institute for Research of Quality of Life, Romania

Mario Holzner, Sebastian Leitner and Robert Stehrer, “Inequality and Public Finance in Central, East and Southeast Europe
The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (WIIW), Austria

Edlira Narazani, “Labour Supply, Remittances and the New Flat Tax in Albania
University of Turin, Italy

Nermin Oruc, “Self-Selection in Conflict-Induced Migration: Micro Evidence from Bosnia
Staffordshire University, UK

Isilda Shima, “Modern Slavery in the Balkans: Social-economic Adverse Effects of Restrictions on Migration
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Austria

Discussant

Tom Coupé
RNP Head and Director, EERC
Kyiv School of Economics, Ukraine

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Parallel B.5: East Asia Development Network (EADN) & South Asia Network of Economic Research Institutes (SANEI) Joint Session on “Cases of Natural Resource Management in Mainland and Archipelagic Asia”
Location: Library, Ground Floor, AFESD

At the micro level, many times the scenes surrounding natural resource extraction activities are not that encouraging. Conflicts seem to associate with resource extraction in developing economies. They include socio-economic conflicts among resource extractive operators, between operators and local communities, between operators and authorities, among relevant authorities at various levels of government, between local authorities and local communities, and within local communities. These conflicts can be caused by 1) policy and regulatory uncertainties over resource use and property rights, 2) illegal extraction activities, 3) pollution and environmental impacts, and 4) marginalization livelihoods of local people. The question then is whether or not there exists natural resource management policy creating significant links between natural resource-abundant and both economic and social development at the micro level, avoiding conflicts and providing sustainable benefits from the resources. The objective of organizing this session is to present various case studies in mainland and archipelagic Asia to help us understand on how to develop natural resource management policy to better links extractions of natural resources and regional development. It aims to seek a framework for balancing natural resource extraction and social concerns with the need to promote economic development and alleviate poverty, particularly in areas where poverty baskets exist.

Co-Chairs

Rehana Siddiqui
Chief of Research
Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Pakistan

M. Hadi Soesastro
Senior Research Fellow
Center for Strategic and International Studies, USA

Speakers

A. Banerji, “Markets, Institutions and Efficiency: Groundwater Irrigation in North India” (co-authored with Gauri Khanna and J.V. Meenakshi)
Delhi School of Economics, India

Alice Joan G. Ferrer, “Evaluation of Fisheries Management Options for Visayan Sea, Philippines: The Case of Northern Iloilo
Division of Social Sciences
University of the Philippines in the Visayas, The Philippines

Mahmood Khalid, “Laws and Natural Resource Management: A Case Study of Selected Districts in North West Frontier Province (NWFP) of Pakistan” (co-authored with Hafiz Hanzla Jalil and Syed Akhter Hussain Shah)
Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Pakistan

Budy P. Resosudarmo, “Illegal Fishing in the Arafura Sea” (co-authored with David Campbell and Lydia Napitupulu)
Arndt-Corden Division of Economics
Australian National University, Australia

4:30 PM – 6.30 PM
GDN Advisory Committee and Board Meeting
Location: Emerald Room C, Sheraton Hotel

7.30 PM - 9.30 PM
SPECIAL SESSION ON GDN'S 10TH ANNIVERSARY AND OPENING DINNER
Location: Diamond Ballroom, Sheraton Hotel

Chair

Isher Judge Ahluwalia
Board Member, GDN, and Chairperson, Board of Governors, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER), India

Speakers

Richard Cooper
Deputy Chairman, GDN Board of Directors
Professor, Harvard University, USA

Lyn Squire
First President, GDN
USA

Wednesday, February 4, 2009: Main Conference Day 2

9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
PLENARY 2: THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

This session is envisaged to address the following questions: How do a country’s natural resource endowments affect economic growth through their influence on socioeconomic and political institutions? What do we know regarding the relationship between natural resources and civil war and its implications for conflict prevention? Are good institutions key determinants for a successful natural resource management? And what actually determines good institutions? Is this the consequence of colonial heritage or it is rather a nation’s natural endowments which are important in determining future institutional quality? Is democracy necessary for the efficient management of natural resources? How can countries abundant in natural resources strengthen the power of institutions that deal with issues on transparency and check and balances on the use of rents?

Chair

Ravi Kanbur
Board Member, GDN
T.H. Lee Professor of World Affairs, International Professor of Applied Economics and Management and Professor of Economics, Cornell University, USA

Speakers

Paul Collier, “The Political Economy of Natural Resources: Interdependence and its Implications
Director, Centre for the Study of African Economies
University of Oxford, UK

Terry Lynn Karl, “Governance Over a Barrel? Oil Rents, Institutions, and the Paradox of Regime Durability
Professor of Political Science and Gildred Professor of Latin American Studies
Stanford University, USA

Tarik Yousef, “Redistribution Versus Democratization: The Logic of Authoritarian Bargains
Dean
The Dubai School of Government, UAE

Discussant

Kishore Gawande
Professor, Roy and Helen Ryu Chair of Economics and GovernmentThe Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University, USA

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Tea / Coffee Break

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel C.1:
Presentation by Finalists of 2008 Global Development Medals Competition on the theme “Exploitation of Natural Resources: Trends and Environmental Implications”
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

Unsustainable exploitation of natural resources has manifested in deforestation, desertification, air and water pollution and soil degradation. Presentations in this category will address aspects of exploitation of natural resources and their environmental implications. Presentations will highlight the effects of environmental degradation on urbanization, livelihoods, social equity issues, and outline the economic costs of loss of bio-diversity, implications of carbon financing mechanisms, the valuation of resources and their accounting in the national accounting systems.

Chair

Priya Shyamsundar
Program Director
South Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics (SANDEE), Nepal

Speakers

Pushpam Kumar, “Contracts in the Payments for Ecosystem Services: The Case of Bioprospecting
Environmental Economist
University of Liverpool, UK

Mohamed Ahmed Awad, “Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment of the Sustainability of Agricultural and Rural Development in Lake Nasser Region, Egypt
Lecturer
University of Alexandria, Egypt

Vikram Dayal, “Social Diversity and Ecological Complexity: How an Invasive Tree could Affect Diverse Agents in the Land of the Tiger
Associate Professor
Institute of Economic Growth (IEG), India

Julia G. Maturana, “Promoting Valuation of Forest Land by Tree Plantation Industries: Case Studies from Indonesia
Research Director
La Universidad Católica Santo Toribio de Mogrovejo (USAT), Peru

Vicky Alejandra Saravia López, “Is the Environmental Kuznets Curve in Latin America and the Caribbean Region a Fact?
Researcher
Institute of Social and Economic Studies (IESE), Mozambique

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel C.2:
Presentation by Finalists of 2008 Global Development Medals Competition on the theme “The Governance and Political Economy of Natural Resource Management”
Location: Round Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

Institutions and governance play a crucial role in the management of natural resources. Submissions in this category will reflect on important issues related to ensuring equity, accountability and transparency in NRM, role of institutional lock-ins and civil society for ensuring equity, decentralized governance of natural resources, role of electoral systems and effects of civil conflicts on NRM. Questions will identify lessons and policy recommendations by addressing the crucial role of institutions in the overall NRM-growth-development relationship which will be available for the benefit of the various stakeholders such as governments, donors, NGOs and regional organizations.

Chair

Mauricio Cardenas
RNP Head and President, LACEA, Colombia and,
Director, Latin American Initiative
Brookings Institution, USA

Speakers

Ana Espinola-Arredondo, “Free-riding and Cooperation in International Environmental Agreements
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Washington State University, USA

Rocio del P Moreno-Sanchez, “Can Co-management Strategies Improve Governance in a Marine Protected Area? Lessons From Experimental Economic Games in the Colombian Caribbean
Researcher
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

Luc Desire Omgba, “On the Duration of Political Power in Africa: The Role of Oil Rent
PhD candidate
Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International (CERDI), France

Chibuike Uche, “Oil, British Interests and the Nigerian Civil War
Lecturer
University of Nigeria (Enugu Campus), Nigeria

Savin V Vladislav, “Mapping Oil and Gas Pipelines in North-East Asia
Researcher
Institute for the Studies of External Economic Relations (GU-HSE)

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel C.3:
Presentation by Finalists of 2008 Global Development Medals Competition on the theme “Societies and Natural Resource Management”
Location: Tunisian Room, Ground Floor, AFESD

The social impacts of and responses to human induced changes to natural resources have given rise to the need for natural resource management and social sustainability, primarily at the local community level. Presentations in this category will address one or more aspects of the various activities, practices and policies involving use local techniques, role of indigenous communities and women in community based management, adoption of corporate sustainability and urban planning that can be employed for an efficient natural resource management within the working framework of a society, and their replication at a universal level.

Chair

Samir Makdisi
Former Board Member, GDN
Professor of Economics, American University of Beirut, Lebanon

Speakers

Robert Charles G. Capistrano, “An Institutional Analysis of Community Participation on Marine Protected Areas within Tourism Sites in the Philippines
Graduate
Marine Affairs Program -Dalhousie University, Canada

Gang Liu, “Rural Household Energy Consumption and its Impacts on Eco-environment in Tibet - Taking Taktse County as an Example
Research Fellow
Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

L.V Thiet, “Entertainment - Education and Rice Pest Management: A Radio Soap Opera in Vietnam
International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), The Philippines

Catalina Trujillo, “The Effects of Markets on the Use of Forest for the Livelihood of Indigenous Households in the Colombian Amazon
Researcher
OMACHA Foundation, Colombia

Manasi Kumar, “Valuation of Ecosystem Services: A Psychocultural Perspective
Doctoral Candidate
University College London, UK

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel C.4:
Presentation by Finalists of 2008 Global Development Medals Competition on the theme “The Economics of Natural Resource Management”
Location: Mamloukeiya Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

Economic factors influence the success of environmental practice change which in turn is becoming a central theme in the development planning objectives of every economy. This category will include presentations that broadly address issues related to volatility in primary commodity markets and their implications, ‘Dutch disease’ effects (impact on relative prices, real exchange rate), and whether natural resource endowments are a curse or blessing for economic development. The presentations will reflect upon the necessary changes required and cost implications for economic and social policies incorporating natural resource management, and the causes for low growth rates in countries abundant in natural resources.

Chair

Ernest Aryeetey
Board Member, GDN
Director, Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER)
University of Ghana, Ghana

Speakers

Carolle Avocèvou, “Sustainable Use of Non-Timber Forest Products: Impact of Fruit Harvesting on Pentadesma Butyracea Regeneration and Financial Analysis of its Products Trade in Benin
PhD student
Laboratory of Applied Ecology, University of Ab-Calav, Benin

Boubaker Dhehibi, “Measuring Irrigation Water Efficiency with a Stochastic Production Frontier: An Application for Citrus Producing Farms in Tunisia
Researcher
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Tunisia

Venkatesh Dutta, “Meeting Water Demands Through Differential Quality Water Supply from Groundwater and Surface Water: An Economic Assessment from a Large Metropolis and its Peri-urban Environments”Assistant Professor, School of Environmental Sciences (SES)Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University (BBAU), India

Houssem Eddine Chebbi, “Long and Short-Run Linkages between Economic Growth, Energy Consumption and Co2 Emissions in Tunisia”Assistant ProfessorFaculté des Sciences Economiques et de Gestion de Nabeul (FSEGN), Tunisia

Juan Rodrigo Fuentes, “Development Paths, Natural Resources and Dynamic Comparative Advantages
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics
Univesidad Católica de Chile, Chile

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel C.5:
Presentation by Finalists of 2008 Global Development Medals Competition Theme on “Foreign Direct Investment and Natural Resources”
Location: Library, Ground Floor, AFESD

Natural resources attract foreign direct investment (FDI), a useful alternative to debt in financing development. Presentations in this category will identify the different pull factors affecting FDI, success factors for national companies (as opposed to MNCs) leading natural resource investments, FDI spillovers (if any) and sustainable and innovative fiscal regimes attempting at a fairer and more transparent distribution of rents.

Chair

Ravi Kanbur
Board Member, GDN
T.H. Lee Professor of World Affairs, International Professor of Applied Economics and
Management and Professor of Economics, Cornell University, USA

Speakers

Wasseem Mina, “The Location Determinants of FDI in the GCC Countries
Assistant Professor, College of Business and Economics,
UAE University, UAE

Amarendra Das, “Do Firm Ownership and Competition have Bearing on Productivity? An Enquiry of Indian Mining Industry from 1998-99 to 2005-06
PhD Candidate
Centre for Development Studies (CDS), India

Soumyananda Dinda, “Factors Attracting FDI Inflows to Resource-rich Poor-Nigeria: A Time Series Econometric Analysis
Assistant Professor
Madras School of Economics, India

Anton Kolotilin, “Determinants of Expropriation in the Oil Sector: A Theory and Evidence from Panel Data
Graduate Student
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA

Wasseem Mina, “External Commitment Mechanisms, Institutions and FDI in GCC countries
Assistant Professor, College of Business and Economics,
UAE University, UAE

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Lunch
Location: Atrium, AFESD

2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
PLENARY 3:
THE CHALLENGE OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENTLocation: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

This plenary will address a number of central questions: What reforms need to set up regarding the current accounting framework to treat natural resources as productive capital and to consider loss of natural capital as disinvestment or capital consumption? What are the most important goals that accounting frameworks should pursue? Are they useful in effectively dealing with the policy trade-offs that arise in discussions about sustainability? What would the short and long term costs and benefits be for the corporate sector? How countries can help SMEs integrate sustainable development thinking into their production processes and operations without compromising their development? And, how countries can promote public-private partnerships to fully integrate long-term sustainability into poverty eradication and sustainable development?What reforms can be implemented to enable environment and public policies that shape markets to attract more foreign direct investment, to create conditions for socially responsible investment in developing countries? And what sort of fiscal reforms are necessary to reduce excessive use of resources like water and energy?

Chair

Andrew Steer
Director General, Policy and Research
Department for International Development (DFID), UK

Speakers

Per Pinstrup-Andersen, “The Food System and Sustainable Natural Resource Management” (co-authored with Derrill D. Watson II)
H.E. Babcock Professor of Food, Nutrition and Public Policy
Cornell University, USA

Marianne Fay, “Development in a Changing Climate: The Role of Ethics, Inertia and Irreversibility
Co-Director, World Development Report 2010
The World Bank, USA

Thomas Sterner, “Domestic Fuel Prices in Oil-exporting Countries: Significance for Climate Damage
President, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists
Professor of Environmental Economics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Discussant

Priya Shyamsundar
Program Director
South Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics (SANDEE), Nepal

4.00 PM – 4.30 PM
Tea / Coffee Break

4.30 PM – 4.45 PM
3ie LAUNCH ANNOUNCEMENT
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

4.45 PM – 6.00 PM
PRIZE DISTRIBUTION CEREMONY FOR WINNERS OF 2008 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT AWARDS & MEDALS COMPETITION
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

Chair

Gobind Nankani
President
Global Development Network

7.30 PM - 9.30 PM
DINNER (CO-SPONSORED BY 3ie)
Location: Kuwait Towers

Thursday, February 5, 2009: Main Conference Day 3

9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
PLENARY 4: THE WEALTH OF NATIONS: REVENUE AND FISCAL MANAGEMENT OFNATURAL RESOURCES
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

This plenary will address a number of key questions: How can multinational organizations help countries to implement National Revenues Funds to manage natural resource revenues? What about investment strategies of resource-rich countries? Should they rely on financial markets? What are the pros and cons of accumulating a Sovereign Wealth Fund (SWF)? How can they deal with price volatility in natural resources and the timing of revenues? How can they deal with uncertainty surrounding the long term sustainability of natural resources? What institutional reforms should be adopted to ensure that the appropriate macroeconomic decisions are put into place? How institutions and systems that support innovation and entrepreneurial development can be strengthened? How transparency on natural resources transactions can be improved?

Chair

Louis Kasekende
Chief Economist
African Development Bank, Tunisia

Speakers

Vittorio Corbo, “Managing a Commodity Boom: Theory and Practice
President Central Bank of Chile (2003-2007)
Senior Research Associate, Centro de Estudios Públicos, Chile

Alan Gelb, “Oil Rents: How to Use Them Well?” (co-authored with Sina Grassman)
Board Member, GDN
Director of Development Policy, Office of the Chief Economist
The World Bank, USA

Anthony J. Venables, “Harnessing Windfall Revenues: Optimal Policies for Resource-rich Developing Economies
BP Professor of Economics & Director of OxCarre
University of Oxford, UK

Discussant

Helmut Reisen
Head of Research
OECD Development Centre, France

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Tea / Coffee Break

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel D.1:
Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association (LACEA) Session on “Natural Resource Booms, Macroeconomic Management and Civil Conflict in Latin America”
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

The session will address the management of Natural Resource Booms and their impact on the economy. Some experiences of Natural Resource Booms in Latin America display characteristics that make their study particularly interesting. e.g. natural resource booms have been tied to the dynamics of civil conflict in Colombia. The session will also include analyses of the macroeconomic management of natural resource booms in Latin America. Two Latin American cases, Venezuela and Chile, are particularly interesting because they represent polar experiences. While Chile is recognized for its successful management of cooper booms, avoiding the destabilizing consequences traditional observed during these episodes, Venezuela is in the opposite extreme with regards to Oil Booms.

Chair

Pablo Sanguinetti
Associate Professor of Economics
Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Argentina

Speakers

Osmel Manzano, “Venezuela: A Textbook Case of a Resource-rich Country?
Senior Research Economist, Inter American Development Bank
Adjunct Professor, Universidad Catolica Andres Bello, Venezuela

Eric Parrado, “Cooper Booms and Fiscal Stabilization in Chile
Ministry of Finance, Chile

Juan Fernando Vargas, “Commodity Price Shocks and Civil Conflict: Evidence fromColombia” (co-authored with Oeindrila Dube)
Assistant Professor
Universidad del Rosario, Colombia

Discussant

Mauricio Cardenas
RNP Head and President, LACEA, Colombia and,Director, Latin American InitiativeBrookings Institution, USA

Arturo Jose Galindo
Inter-American Development Bank (IADB), USA

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel D.2:
World Bank Session on “World Development Report (WDR) 2010 ‘Climate Change and Development’”
Location: Round Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

The goal of this session is to elicit comments and reactions on the emerging findings and storyline of the WDR 2010 on “Development in a Changing Climate”. The report argues that while climate change is one of many challenges facing developing countries, it must be tackled soon, or else it will reverse development gains. Developing countries simply cannot afford to ignore climate change; nor can they focus on adaptation alone. The report therefore argues that climate change does indeed represent a changing climate for development. Climate-smart development, which incorporates adaptation and mitigation objectives is needed and can be achieved. A rethinking of development policy can help to meet these challenges and to exploit the new competitive landscape created by climate change. But an adequate, achievable and acceptable (in the sense of being efficient and equitable) solution to climate change also requires a climate framework that meets the needs and concerns of developing countries. Access to financial and an innovation instrument is particularly critical.

Chair

Justin Lin
Chief Economist and Sr. Vice President, Development Economics
The World Bank, USA

Speaker

Marianne Fay
Co-Director, World Development Report 2010
The World Bank, USA

Discussant

Ravi Kanbur
Board Member, GDN
T.H. Lee Professor of World Affairs, International Professor of Applied Economics and Management and Professor of Economics, Cornell University, USA

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel D.3:
African Economic Research Consortium (AERC) Session on “Natural Resources and Development in Contemporary Sub-Saharan Africa”
Location: Tunisian Room, Ground Floor, AFESD

Contemporarily, the 48 Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries depend considerably on renewable and/or non-renewable natural resources. Indeed, 24 of them depend heavily on non-renewable natural resources, (oil, natural gas, and other mineral products) for exports. Two countries (Ghana and Uganda) are joining the league of oil producing countries. Between 1960 and 1975, virtually all SSA countries benefited from the high demand for these natural resources required to support the growth and development of the industrialized countries of Western Europe. The 1973 Arab oil embargo accelerated natural resources deletion program by OECD countries such that, by the beginning of the 1980, they have become less dependent on natural resources leading to massive drop in the demand for these natural resources. The failure of SSA countries to use their earnings from these natural resources during the previous boom era to diversify their economic base and secure sustainable growth resulted in the massive growth collapse of the 1980s. Currently, virtually all SSA countries are benefiting, to different degrees, from the high demand for these natural resources occasioned significantly by the rise of China and India thus contributing to the contemporary growth revival. The challenge to the SSA researchers and policy makers is how to avoid a repeat of the past. This session is therefore, designed to explore options for utilizing proceeds of natural resources for sustainable growth and development in SSA. It also explores options for transforming transitory resource flows from natural resources to permanent resource flows needed to support sustainable longterm development process in Africa.

Chair

Louis Kasekende
Chief Economist
African Development Bank, Tunisia

Speakers

Ernest Aryeetey, “Natural Resource Management and Economic Growth in Africa: A Case from Ghana
Board Member, GDN
Director, Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER)
University of Ghana, Ghana

Leonce Ndikumana, “Options for Transforming Transitory Income from Natural Resources to Permanent Income for Sustainable Development in Africa” (co-authored with John Anyanwu)
Director of Research
African Development Bank, Tunisia

Discussants

Bright Okogu
Director-General, Budget
Ministry of Finance, Nigeria

Samuel Wangwe
Chairman
Daima Associates, Tanzania

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel D.4:
European Development Research Network (EUDN) Session on “Environmental Challenges of the 21st Century”
Location: Mamloukeiya Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

Chair

Jean-Philippe Platteau
Board Member, GDN & RNP Head, EUDN
Facultés Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Belgium

Speakers

Jean-Marie Baland, “Forests to the People: Decentralization and Forest Degradation in the Indian Himalayas” (co-authored with Dilip Mookherjee, Pranab Bardhan and Sanghamitra Das)
Professor, University of Namur, Belgium

Benedikt Goderis, “Commodity Prices, Growth and the Natural Resource Curse: Reconciling a Conundrum” (co-authored with Paul Collier)
Oxford Institute for Global Economic Development (OxIGED)
University of Oxford, UK

Eswaran Somanathan, “Does Social Capital Exist? A Definition and a Test
Professor
Indian Statistical Institute, India

Discussant

Jan Willem Gunning
Professor
VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Parallel D.5:
GDN-Japan Roundtable on “Natural Resources and Development - Alternative Ideas for Sustainable Development”
Location: Library, Ground Floor, AFESD

In the current era in which the world faces limits to its fossil fuel resources, the challenge to developing countries is the formulation of appropriate policies to shape their economies. Diminishing resources and environmental concerns pose restrictions on economic and industrial development and alternative ideas for sustainable development are urgently needed. International cooperation frameworks between resource-rich and resource-poor countries are not sufficient in attaining a balance between diminishing resources and long-term sustainable development. This session will attempt to expand the definition of “natural resources” to include non-energy, regional resources such as geographical, historical, cultural, and human resources. Presenters will disseminate an alternative development model, based on field experiences that focus on adding value to unique regional resources to attain sustainable economic development at the community level. For resource-poor countries, a plausible approach to attaining sustainable development is to fully utilize within their own capacity the regional resources that they possess within their country or community. Field experiences show that resource-poor countries can discover their unique resources (geographical, historical, cultural, and human resources) and add value by combining local knowledge and marketing skills. Such local development efforts provide opportunities for local people to participate in the decision making and profit-seeking processes instead of depending on outside assistance and leadership, and can also promote non-industrial, sustainable economic activities. This session will focus on institution-building toward endogenous development of resource-poor countries without depending too much on external natural resources. Drawing upon the experience of Japan as a resource-poor country, this session will also discuss possibilities of exploitation and utilization of various resources in community-based resources management.

Moderator

Toru Take
Division Chief, Research Network Division
JICA Research Institute, Japan

Speakers

John Kiyaga-Nsubuga, “Challenges of Local Development: Uganda's Experience in Perspective
Director-General
Uganda Management Institute, Uganda

Tomohiro Oh, “Why Do Fishermen Plant Trees? Local Initiatives in Restoring Natural Resources Connection of Yakushima, Japan” (co-authored with Jin Sato)
Institute of Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences
University of Tokyo, Japan

Hideshi Sasahara, “Progress of Reciprocal Collaboration Between Mountain Villages and Urban Areas Through Water Resources Management
Planning and Design Division
Japan Water Agency, Japan

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Lunch
Location: Atrium, AFESD

2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
CLOSING SESSION
- POLICY ROUNDTABLE: AFTER THE BOOM, MUST THERE BE BUST? MANAGING NATURAL RESOURCE CYCLES
Location: Multi-purpose Hall, AFESD

Moderator

Hilary Bowker
Founder and President
Bowker Media + Communication, UK

Panelists

Joachim von Braun
Director General
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA

Justin Lin
Chief Economist and Sr. Vice President, Development Economics
The World Bank, USA

Guillermo Perry
Former Board Member, GDN
Senior Research Associate, Fedesarrollo, Colombia

Bader al-Saad
Managing Director
Kuwait Investment Authority, Kuwait

Charles Soludo
Executive Governor
Central Bank of Nigeria, Nigeria

Nader Hamad Sultan
Chairman
Ikarus Petroleum Industries, Kuwait

4.00 PM – 4.30 PM
Tea / Coffee Break

4.30 PM – 5.30 PM
Press Conference
Location: Tunisian Room, Fourth Floor, AFESD

4.30 PM – 7.00 PM
Visit – The Kuwait Scientific Center (Aquarium)

7.30 PM – 9.30 PM
CLOSING DINNER
Location: Al Boom Restaurant, Radisson Hotel

Donors & Sponsors

African Capacity Building Foundation, Zimbabwe

Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development, Kuwait

Australian Agency for International Development, Australia

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, United States

Department for International Development, United Kingdom

Federal Ministry of Finance, Austria

International Development Research Centre, Canada

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Irish Agency for International Development, Ireland

Japan International Cooperation Agency, Japan

Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Finland

Ministry of Development Cooperation, Luxembourg

Ministry of Finance, Japan

Ministry of Finance, Luxembourg

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, Spain

Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The Netherlands

New Zealand Agency for International Development, New Zealand

Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation, Norway

Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, United Kingdom

The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, Austria

The World Bank, United States United Nations Development Programme, United States

Veolia Environment Institute, France

  • OpenEdition Journals