Navigation – Plan du site

Digital Elevation Model of coastal and flood plains obtained from vector data: an alternative method applied to the Coatzacoalcos fluvial plain (Mexico)

Un Modèle Numérique de Terrain des plaines côtières et inondables obtenu à partir de données vectorielles : une méthode alternative appliquée à la plaine fluviale de Coatzacoalcos (Mexique)
Carolina Ramírez-Núñez et Jean-François Parrot
p. 163-174

Résumés

Les données vectorielles peuvent être utilisées pour engendrer des Modèles Numériques de Terrain (MNT), mais dans le cas des plaines fluviales et côtières, l'interpolation, en fonction des contraintes topographiques, nécessite un autre type d'intervention pour obtenir un résultat de qualité. Au Mexique, il n’existe ni points de contrôle des données ni de Modèle Numérique de Terrain provenant des données LiDAR (MNT LiDAR) pour l’ensemble de ces régions, de telle sorte que ce sont surtout les données vectorielles qui sont habituellement utilisées pour engendrer des MNTs. Ce manque d'information nous a conduit à proposer une méthode pour obtenir une solution de rechange qui permet de créer un MNT alternatif en se basant sur l’utilisation des données vectorielles disponibles dans le pays, en particulier parce que ces plaines fluviales et côtières, qui sont fréquemment touchées par des inondations, nécessitent ce type de produit. Le RMSE (root mean square error) ainsi que l'écart type du MNT alternatif sont plus faibles (0,0074 et 0,0059) que dans le cas du MNT LiDAR (0,0945 et 0,0793). D'autre part, la validation se base également sur une comparaison des résultats obtenus à partir d’une simulation d'inondation appliquée au MNT ainsi qu’au MNT LiDAR correspondant. La zone couverte par l'inondation simulée est 716,63 km2 pour le MNT et de 787,82 km2 dans le cas du MNT LiDAR. En ce qui concerne les volumes, ils sont respectivement de 1,02 km3 et 0,86 km3 pour le MNT alternatif et le MNT LiDAR.

Haut de page

Notes de la rédaction

Article soumis le 13 octobre 2014, reçu sous sa forme révisée le 14 janvier 2015, accepté le 15 mars 2015.

Texte intégral

We would like to thank the reviewers for their constructive review. Special acknowledgement to Ann Grant for her valuable remarks and corrections concerning English version.

1. Introduction

1Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are produced from various techniques such as photogrammetry from aerial photos and satellite images (Ayhan et al., 2006; Paul et al., 2004; Casson et al., 2003), radar images (AbuBakr et al., 2013; Hong et al., 2010), laser scanning using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR; Allen et al., 2012) and classical ground survey methods (Nelson et al., 2009; Hirt et al., 2010). Their precision and accuracy will depend on the sensor used, technique, scale and type of terrain (Florinsky, 2012). Detailed information about the earth’s surface is increasingly required in order to perform simulations and calculations from the terrain that respond to problems such as landslides and floods. In Mexico, this detailed information is not yet available for all the country, the number of check point data bases is limited, and most of the bare earth surface models are generated by the use of contour line interpolations such as in ARCGIS, IDRISI and ILWIS software (Hutchinson, 1988; Douglas, 2000). DEMs provided by INEGI (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática) follow this procedure and cover most parts of the country. Vector data can be used to generate DEMs, but the nature of the terrain of fluvial and coastal plains requires other types of interventions to produce detailed results.

2Generally, the interpolation of contour lines, a phenomenon inherent to raster contour line drawing produces an overestimation of altitude values corresponding to these contour lines in the resulting images (Taud et al., 1999). This problem can be partially solved by changing the hypsometric scale. A β spline smoothing applied to altitude values in millimetres attempts to diminish this overestimation (Parrot, 2014a). Furthermore, this millimetre hypsometric scale eliminates the staircase effect observed in wide zones that present a slight slope. This improvement is not so necessary in mountainous regions because of their high number of closely spaced contour lines, but in coastal plains the problem remains and needs another type of solution. For instance, in the Coatzacoalcos lower basin (Veracruz State, Mexico) used here as a test area (fig. 1), 2889.027 km2 lies at between 0 and 10 m, i.e. for 35.5% of the lower basin there are no details; 92% of the 0-10 m zone has a slope of 0°.

Fig. 1 – Area of Veracruz State, Mexico, used as the basis of a flood simulation.
Fig. 1 – Zone d’étude dans l'Etat de Véracruz, Mexique, utilisée comme base de la simulation hydrologique.

Fig. 1 – Area of Veracruz State, Mexico, used as the basis of a flood simulation. Fig. 1 – Zone d’étude dans l'Etat de Véracruz, Mexique, utilisée comme base de la simulation hydrologique.

DEM interpolation (Parrot, 2012a) from dxf contour lines (INEGI, 2012).
Interpolation du Modèle Numérique de Terrain (Parrot, 2012a) à partir d’un fichier dxf contenant les courbes de niveau (INEGI, 2012).

3Here, we propose an alternative method for producing a DEM for coastal and flood plains by means of vector data. First, the treatments used to generate this DEM are described. Then, the result is validated by the root mean square roughness (RMSR) and the root mean square error (RMSE) using the Felicísimo (1994) method, a LiDAR Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and a regional flood simulation to compare the resulting areas and volumes due to flooding since this region is regularly affected by flooding. The importance of this product lies in its potential for use as a valuable tool for civil protection.

2. Test area

4The test area used to illustrate the method is in southeastern Mexico, in the lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River fluvial plain in Veracruz State, where the continent narrows into the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (Oaxaca and Veracruz States). The river rises in the Sierra Niltepec, Oaxaca State, and flows through 325 km from south to north until arriving at the Gulf of Mexico. The basin has an area of 17,369 km2 and the runoff is estimated as 28,093 Mm3 (Comisión Nacional del Agua, 2010). This area is regularly affected by floods and is, therefore, ideal for simulation of such an event as a validation tool.

3. Data used and method

5The vector format is a tagged data representation of all the information contained in a digital drawing file; each drawing element in the file is preceded by an integer number that represents a group code that can be modelled directly using a GIS. Even if nowadays numerical DEMs can be generated by stereoscopic digital images (Baily et al., 2003; Schiefer and Gilbert, 2007; Publighe and Fava, 2013), DEM building of raster type from vector contour lines remains a low-cost treatment that provides good results and that can be improved as we show in this paper. The contour lines used in vector format were digitized from stereo pairs of aerial photographs so that the available scales of these data are 1:50,000 or 1:250,000; the DEMs in raster format were obtained mainly from the interpolation of vector contour lines providing resolutions of 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 m (INEGI, 2014). The resulting DEMs were verified by level banks and geodetic points at the national scale. The resulting sets of contour lines provided by INEGI (2012) do not take into account the contour line corresponding to sea level. This value has to be sought in another data type that contains information about water bodies. The other water bodies, such as lagoons, lakes and dams, have no altitude value. These perimeters need to be integrated in the set of contour lines to attribute, in a following stage, to each pixel that belongs to the sea level or water body an altitude value before final interpolation. The present DEM generation method requires six stages (fig. 3) as follows:

Fig. 2 – Altitude ranges.
Fig. 2 – Classes d'altitude.

Fig. 2 – Altitude ranges. Fig. 2 – Classes d'altitude.

A: Superimposed areas on the shadowed DEM: dark gray, 0-10 m; light gray, 11-20 m. B: Surface percentage of hypsometric classes.
A : Tranches d’altitude reportées sur un estompage du Modèle Numérique de Terrain : gris foncé : 0-10 m, gris clair : 11-20 m. B : Histogramme du pourcentage des surfaces correspondant aux tranches d’altitude.

Fig. 3 – Flow chart for DEM production for coastal and fluvial plains.
Fig. 3 – Organigramme de la production de MNT dans les plaines côtières et plaines alluviales.

Fig. 3 – Flow chart for DEM production for coastal and fluvial plains. Fig. 3 – Organigramme de la production de MNT dans les plaines côtières et plaines alluviales.

Software and algorithms used: Parrot (1998, 2005, 2006, 2011, 2012b-g, 2013, 2014a, 2014b) and Parrot and Ramírez-Núñez (2012a-c).
Logiciels et algorithmes utilisés : Parrot (1998, 2011, 2012b-g, 2013, 2014b) and Parrot and Ramírez-Núñez (2012a-c).

3.1. Stage 1. Production of the main raster image (contour lines)

6As oceans are classed as water bodies, the first vector contour line for coastal areas generally starts at 10 m altitude in INEGI data. The vector water bodies file contains labelled objects such as river banks and perimeter of the sea surface considered as polygons within the topographic maps. This file also contains channels and aqueducts but none of these features has an altitude value. A first algorithm (Sum_cn_ha_dxf) attributes the altitude value 0 to coastlines and introduces this feature into the vector contour line file. As the river banks, even if they are inland, have the same label, the altitude of all river banks is 0. Moreover, oxbow and lagoon borders also have this altitude. When the vector contour line file has been completed in this way, a second algorithm generates a raster image of 8 bits (Transf_dxf_v2) where a grey tone value is given to each contour line and water-body border according to its altitude (Fig. 4A). Artifacts inherent to raster format such as hiatus and 4-neighbour pixels are removed (Net_curve2 and Hiatus).

Fig. 4 Basic raster images for DEM generation.
Fig. 4 – Images raster de base utilisées pour engendrer le MNT.

Fig. 4 – Basic raster images for DEM generation. Fig. 4 – Images raster de base utilisées pour engendrer le MNT.

A: Contour lines and water bodies (8 bits). B: Surface of the rivers. C: River banks. D: Water bodies. E: Perimeter of the water bodies. F: Remaining surface inside the flood plain (< 10 m). Note: Figures A, C and E correspond to a dilation (one iteration) to emphasize the contours.
A : Courbes de niveau et étendues d’eau (8 bits). B : Surface couverte par les rivières. C : Périmètre des berges. D : Plans d'eau. E : Périmètre des plans d'eau. F : Surface restante à l'intérieur de la plaine inondable (< 10 m). Note : les contours des images A, C et D ont été dilatés pour des raisons de lisibilité.

3.2. Stage 2. Production of the basic input data for water bodies

7All the water body limits are codified with the value zero and this value is assigned manually to the inner surface. This manual operation allows all the water bodies to be labelled. At this stage, different treatments can be used specifically for water bodies that do not correspond to river surfaces, such as oxbows, lagoons and dams. It is possible to define an altitude value for each labelled water body in order to generate the DEM, or to define two different groups: the first corresponds to the water bodies that belong to the fluvial plain (an altitude lower than 10 m) and the second group concerns water bodies with an altitude above 10 m. At the end of these pre-treatments, five binary images are obtained (Parrot 2011, 2013), images that represent the base for DEM generation (see flowchart in figure 3). These images are as follows: river surface (fig. 4B), river banks (fig. 4C), water bodies in the fluvial plain (fig. 4D), water body perimeters (fig. 4E) and the remaining surface inside the flood plain considered as zones with an altitude lower than 10 m (fig. 4F).

3.3. Stage 3. Production of the basic contour lines image used to generate the final DEM

8The raster file that contains the grey-tone contour lines (8 bits per pixel) and its corresponding table of grey tone/altitude are used to produce an image that contains contour lines employing a 4-bytes codification of its constitutive pixels in such a way that it is possible to register altitudinal values in metres, decimetres, centimetres or millimetres (Brod4_mx and Crear_tabla). This image will be used to generate the DEM at the final stage after integrating the results provided by the treatment described as Stage 4. The contour lines are reported in an integer image where the background corresponds to the null value -999999, and this provisional image is named PI_C4 (fig. 3).

3.4. Stage 4. Computation of the water surface elevation values

9This process is based on the first four binary images: river surface, river banks, water bodies inside the flood plain and the image of the water body perimeters. The main purpose of the developed algorithm is to calculate the altitude values of all the water surfaces by means of two different approaches.

10The first approach needs to separate the isolated water bodies and river surfaces in order to do a specific treatment that concerns the rivers. In that case, the altitude values of the river banks are calculated separately before a river surface is interpolated. The procedure consists in following each river bank from the lower to the upper point and in assigning to each pixel that belongs to the river banks its altitude value according to the number of steps and the altitude value of the two river bank extremities. Regarding the isolated water bodies, the above-mentioned labelling allows attribution separately to each water surface its own value of altitude (Ramírez-Núñez and Parrot, 2014).

11In practice, this procedure is time consuming and therefore limited for a wider use on large areas; it requires many specific and local interventions in order to eliminate some incoherent results especially when confluents are encountered. For this reason, a simpler treatment has been defined and employed. In this case, the regional water level representing the flood expanse is considered as a tilted plan used as a hypsometric reference to calculate the elevation of the river surface and the altitude of the isolated water body surfaces. The number of artifacts generated by this method depends on the configuration of the drainage network and the lack of preferred orientation. In the test area, the drainage network runs globally from south to north, and only a few meanders may cause a slight change in its orientation. Regarding the water surface isolated, the developed algorithm (RiverBodies) allows definition of a reference point used to calculate the different water body surfaces that can be either the centre of gravity of the surface, the point of the highest elevation or the point of the lowest altitude.

12This partial result (fig. 5) is an image called water surface altitude [WSA] codified by using 4-byte pixels.

Fig. 5 – Recalculated altitudes of the surfaces of the water bodies.
Fig. 5 – Altitude recalculée des étendues d’eau.

Fig. 5 – Recalculated altitudes of the surfaces of the water bodies. Fig. 5 – Altitude recalculée des étendues d’eau.

3.5. Stage 5. Production of the riverbed altitudes

13The data used to generate the riverbed altitudes are the lower altitude contour line image that in a general way limits the floodplain (fig. 4A), the image corresponding to the water surface (WSA), the image of the river banks (fig. 4C), the binary image of the water body perimeters (fig. 4E) and the binary surface of the flood plain between the altitudes 0 and 10 m (fig. 4F). As for the final interpolation, the treatment is as follows. For each pixel located in the flood plain, the algorithm New_fast_cauce (Parrot and Ramírez-Núñez, 2012b) searches the smaller distance ds between this pixel and a pixel of the contour line that corresponds to the upper limit of the flood plain (here, the altitude As of this contour line is 10 metres, 100 decimetres, 1000 centimetres or 10000 millimetres) and the smaller distance di between this pixel and the river bank or a water body perimeter (Fig. 6). The corresponding altitude Ai depends on the altitude of the water body reached at this point. Then the altitude value AP of the studied pixel is derived from Ap = Ai + [(As – Ai) x (di/d)] where d = di + ds.

14The result of the floodplain altitudes (FPA) is a file using 4-byte pixels (fig. 7).

Fig. 6 Example of interpolation.
Fig. 6Exemple d'interpolation.

Fig. 6 – Example of interpolation. Fig. 6 – Exemple d'interpolation.

As is the upper altitude (here always 10 m); Ai is the lower altitude of the nearest water body perimeter; ds is the distance As-Ap; di is the distance Ap-Ai; and Ap is the resulting altitude of the pixel.
As correspond à l’altitude supérieure (dans le cas présent celle-ci est toujours égale à 10 m) ; Ai correspond à l'altitude inférieure dont la valeur dépend de celle du périmètre de la masse d’eau la plus proche ; ds correspond à la distance jusqu’à As et di à la distance jusqu’à Ai ; Ap est l'altitude résultant de l’interpolation pour le pixel étudié.

Fig. 7 – Recalculated altitudes on the flood plain between 0 and 10 m without taking into account the altitude of the water bodies.
Fig. 7 – Altitude recalculée de la plaine inondable entre 0 et 10 m, sans tenir compte de l’altitude des étendues d’eau.

Fig. 7 – Recalculated altitudes on the flood plain between 0 and 10 m without taking into account the altitude of the water bodies. Fig. 7 – Altitude recalculée de la plaine inondable entre 0 et 10 m, sans tenir compte de l’altitude des étendues d’eau.

Grey-tones image of the FPA integer 4 file.
L’image FPA est une image de 32 bits en teintes de gris.

3.6. Stage 6. Final DEM generation

15The water surface DEM (WSA) that corresponds to the interpolated rivers and water bodies, together with the former FPA, is superposed (Superpos_rio) on the provisional image PI_C4 that contains the contour lines. The altitude AP of the pixels corresponding to the remaining null values is calculated by the linear interpolation defined above, but in this case the algorithm computes it in each altitude layer (Newmiel, Miel4_mx). An altitude layer corresponds to the hypsometric interval between two consecutive contour lines that are used to define ds and di as well as Ai and As.

16Finally, a smoothing treatment is applied outside the water surfaces used as a mask. The smoothing integrated in the program Suav_mask (Parrot, 2012f) is based on a β spline function. The resulting DEM has a 5 metre resolution and a hypsometric scale in centimetres.

4. Results and validation

17The accuracy of a DEM depends on factors such as the type of data, interpolation, resolution and sensor used to generate it. Low- and medium-frequency errors are related to DEMs produced by means of contour line interpolation (Rieger, 1996; Florinsky, 1998, 2012; Aguilar et al., 2005; Ghilani and Wolf, 2008). The RMSE of elevation is a general way to estimate the accuracy of a DEM, but this evaluation depends on the data from which it was generated (Weschler, 1999). Many estimators use reference altitude points (Ivanov and Kruzhkov, 1992; Bolstad and Stowe, 1994; Wechsler, 1999) or morphometric variables (Young, 1978; Evans, 1979). Generally, validation criteria consist of a comparison between the resulting DEM and another more accurate surface (Wood, 1996; Wechsler, 2000). Nevertheless, the number of reference altitude points is generally limited and it is difficult to consider the reference DEM as the real surface (Florinsky, 2012).

18In this research, in a first approach, we assess the accuracy of our DEM by calculating the RMSR and defining a criterion of homogeneity (H). This index corresponds to the difference between 100 and the quotient multiplied by 100 of the average of the differences between the values of the roughness computed by lines, columns and whole image and the average of these values (see later).

19The RMSE is calculated according to the Felicísimo (1994) procedure, which compares each pixel of the DEM with a local surface provided by its environment. According to Florinsky (2012), this procedure is an elegant validation approach that does not require field data, the point number of which is in any way limited (Wood, 1996; Brasington et al., 2000; Heritage et al., 2009). The results for the RMSE and the RMSR appear in Table 1. Furthermore, in order to overcome the lack of actual field data, the validation is also based on a comparison involving a LiDAR DTM which has the same horizontal and vertical resolution as the DEM generated by the technique described above.

20The last validation corresponds to an application of a regional flood simulation using the procedure described above and applied to the resulting DEM and a new LiDAR product that gives detailed information at a local level.

4.1. Root Mean Square Roughness evaluation

21The RMSR is the square root of the sum of the squares of the difference of altitude between each pixel (i, j) of an image of size m × n and the mean value μ calculated as follows.

22The RMSR can be calculated according to the lines (Rl), columns (Rc) or image (Rt). The standard deviation of the whole image is calculated and a coefficient of Homogeneity (H) is proposed and corresponds to:

23The program takes into account the absolute value of the differences between Rl, Rc and Rt. The same calculation can be applied to a morphologic variable such as the slope (tab. 1).

Tab. 1 – RMSR calculated for the generated DEM and the morphometric variable slope, taking into account the Felicísimo (1994) approach.
Tab. 1Calcul du RMSR appliqué au MNT et sur une variable morphométrique (pente) calculée en tenant compte du traitement proposé par Felicísimo (1994).

RMSR

Homogeneity coefficient

Line

Column

Image

RMSR

Standard Deviation

DEM

9.955

9.422

12.340

0.00171

81.60

Slope (°)

1.364

1.447

1.679

0.00023

85.96

4.2. Root Mean Square Error evaluation

24As mentioned above, methods of accuracy estimation are based on the analysis of the differences observed between altitude values provided by two different sources. The estimator RMSE is calculated as follows:

25where yi is an elevation point from the resulting DEM, yj the value of the corresponding point on the “reference” surface and N the number of sample points. Felicísimo (1994) proposed that a “reference” surface be generated by considering the hypsometric values of the four cardinal points of each studied pixel. As this process is applied to all the DEM pixels, it is also possible to calculate the arithmetic mean and the standard deviation of these differences.

26As the last validation concerns a comparison between the simulations of the flooding expansion calculated using respectively the generated DEM and a Digital Terrain Model provided by LiDAR data (INEGI, 2013), the same treatment has been applied to both models. It is also possible to compare the two roughness results in a treatment done line by line (fig. 8). The RMSE and the standard deviation of the generated DEM are lower (0.0074 and 0.0059) than for the LiDAR DTM (0.0945 and 0.0793), showing that the latter model has a greater level of errors in relation to local manual corrections.

27Finally, a comparison between the two digital models needs to use the fast Fourier transform (Baudemont, 1999) in order to smooth the meander scrollbars (fig. 9).

Fig. 8 – RMSR comparison between the generated DEM and the LiDAR DTM.
Fig. 8 – Résultats pour le RMSR (root mean square roughness) des deux modèles numériques de terrain.

Fig. 8 – RMSR comparison between the generated DEM and the LiDAR DTM. Fig. 8 – Résultats pour le RMSR (root mean square roughness) des deux modèles numériques de terrain.

Fig. 9 – Comparison between the generated DEM and the result of the application of the fast Fourier transform to the LiDAR DTM.
Fig. 9 – Comparaison entre MNT et la transformée de Fourier appliquée au MNT LiDAR.

Fig. 9 – Comparison between the generated DEM and the result of the application of the fast Fourier transform to the LiDAR DTM. Fig. 9 – Comparaison entre MNT et la transformée de Fourier appliquée au MNT LiDAR.

A: LiDAR DTM. B: FFT application (frequency 5% elimination). C: Generated DEM.
A : MNT LiDAR. B : Traitement de la transformée rapide de Fourier. C : MNT.

4.3. Regional flood simulation

28A regional flood simulation has taken into account the resulting DEM and a LiDAR DTM in order to compare and so validate the accuracy in terms of volume and surface. In both cases DEMs have a 5 m pixel resolution and a hypsometric scale in centimetres. In accordance with the height reached during a regional flood event, it is possible to calculate the water surface and the related water volume.

29In a first approach, the flood is simulated from the intersection between the DEM surface and the upper surface of a water sheet. This water sheet is defined by considering the local increasing value of the water surface due to the studied or simulated event upstream and downstream of the main drainage network of the training area. It has also been calculated by use of a local Gaussian function in order to follow the displacement of the general water wave (program Gaussian_Lateral_Flooding; Parrot, 2014c).

30The area and volume were calculated considering a maximum water level rise of 2 m above the river surface; this corresponds to field measurements done after a flood in 2010 and the data reported by the inhabitants about former floods.

31The area calculated from our DEM of the flood plain was 716.63 km2, whereas the LiDAR DTM was from 787.82 km2. Figure 10 shows the overlap between the two DEMs as well as those areas calculated by the individual models.

Fig. 10 Flooded areas in the lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River for the two types of DEM used.
Fig. 10 – Les zones inondées dans le bassin inférieur de la fleuve Coatzacoalcos pour les deux types de DEM utilisés.

Fig. 10 – Flooded areas in the lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River for the two types of DEM used. Fig. 10 – Les zones inondées dans le bassin inférieur de la fleuve Coatzacoalcos pour les deux types de DEM utilisés.

Black: LiDAR calculation; Light gray: area solely covered by the generated DEM; Dark gray: area common to the two calculations, LiDAR DTM and DEM.
Noir : surface seulement couverte par LiDAR DTM ; gris clair : surface uniquement couverte par le MNT provenant du traitement ; gris foncé : calcul de la surface commune aux deux modèles digitaux (MNT créé et LiDAR DTM).

32Such surfaces correspond respectively to a volume of 1.02 km3 for the DEM and of 0.86 km3 for the LiDAR DTM. This difference is clearly associated with the higher level of roughness of the LiDAR DTM due to the presence of many scrollbars associated with meandering, whereas the algorithm used to generate the DEM smoothes the riverbed bottom.

5. Discussion and conclusions

33As floods represent one of the most frequent risks in Mexico, and detailed DEMs such as LiDAR for flood plains and coastal areas are not yet available for all parts of the country, we propose the production of an adaptive raster DEM taking into account vector data at the 1:50,000 scale. The multidirectional interpolation method used here has been reported to give good results (Parrot, 1998; Pérez-Vega and Mas, 2009). This constructive DEM can be used to provide a quick response for governmental agencies in case of emergency.

34Until the generation of LiDAR DTMs that will cover all Mexican regions, especially in flood and coastal plains, the DEM obtained by the proposed method provides reliable results in general calculations such as simulation of regional flooding, for which the detailed scale of LiDAR is not necessary.

35Moreover, for the moment, LiDAR data for flood-plain and coastal areas need corrections that concern mainly the river surface. LiDAR systems use two frequencies, and water depth is determined by measuring the time delay to receive the return signal from the seafloor and water surfaces. When the infrared is reflected from the sea surface the higher-frequency green laser penetrates through the water depending on its clarity. The accuracy of the result depends on the correct management of these two responses. Actually, in the studied region abnormal measurement concerning the river surface indicates altitudes lower than the real values, for instance -0.54 m to the south of Minatitlan City which is at 38 km from the river mouth. A special treatment is required for the surface of a river under a forest canopy (Maune, 2007).

36These observations show clearly that the method developed here to achieve an accurate representation of the relief on coastal plains is an efficient tool for use at a regional scale.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

AbuBakr M., Ghoneim E., El-Baz F., Zeneldin M., Zeid S. (2013) – Use of radar data to unveil the paleolakes and the ancestral course of Wadi El-Arish, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. Geomorphology 194, 34-45.

Aguilar F.J., Agüera F., Aguilar M.A., Carvajal F. (2005) – Effects of terrain morphology, sampling density and interpolation methods on grid DEM accuracy. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 71, 805-816.

Allen T.R., Oertel G.F., Gares P.A. (2012) – Mapping coastal morphodynamics with geospatial techniques, Cape, Henry, Virginia, USA. Geomorphology 137, 138-149.

Ayhan E., Erden O., Atay G., Tunc E. (2006) – Digital orthophoto generation with aerial photos and satellite images and analyzing of factors which affect accuracy, XXIII International FIG Congress, Munich, PS5.8.2 (0552).

Baily B., Collier P., Farres P., Inkpen R., Pearson A. (2003) – Comparative assessment of analytical and digital photogrammetric methods in the construction of DEMs of geomorphological forms. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 28, 307–320.

Brasington J., Rumsby B.T., McVey R.A. (2000) – Monitoring and modelling morphological change in a braided gravel-bed river using high-resolution GPS-based survey. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 25, 973–990.

Baudemont F. (1999) – Analyse numérique des formes de relief sur les modèles numériques de terrain. Thèse Doctorat. Université de Marne-La-Vallée, 167.

Bolstad P.V., Stowe T. (1994) – An evaluation of DEM accuracy: Elevation, slope and aspect. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 60, 1327-1332.

Casson B., Delacourt C., Baratoux D., Allemand P. (2003) – Seventeen years of the « La Clapière” landslide evolution analysed from ortho-rectified aerial photographs. Engineering Geology 68, 123-139.

Comisión Nacional del Agua (CNA) (2010) – Atlas Digital del Agua. Consejo de Cuenca del Río Coatzacoalcos. Comisión Nacional del Agua, Gobierno del Estado de Oaxaca, Gobierno del Estado de Veracruz, Secretaría del Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales y Pesca (SEMARNAP), www. conagua.gob.mx.

Douglas D.H. (2000) CONSURF, The Douglas contour grid methodology. http://www.hig.se/~dds/research/consurf/consur1.htm

Evans I.S. (1979) – Statistical characterization of altitude matrices by computer. An integrated system of terrain analysis and slope mapping. The final report on grant DA-ERO-591-73-G0040, 192. Durham, England: Department of Geography, University of Durham.

Felicísimo A.M. (1994) – Parametric statistical method for error detection in digital evaluation models. ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing 49, 4, 29-33.

Florinsky I.V. (1998) – Combined analysis of Digital Terrain Models and Remotely Sensed Data in landscape investigations. Progress in Physical Geography 22, 33-60.

Florinsky I.V. (2012) – Digital Terrain Analysis in Soil Science and Geology. Academic Press, Elsevier, USA, 379 p.

Ghilani C.D., Wolf P.R. (2008) – Elementary surveying: an introduction to Geomatics. Prentice Hall, 931 p.

Heritage G.L., Milan D.J., Large A.R.G., Fuller I.C. (2009) – Influence of survey strategy and interpolation model on DEM quality. Geomorphology 112, 334-344.

Hirt C., Filmer M.S., Featherstone W.E. (2010) – Comparison and validation of recent freely-available ASTER-GDEM ver1, SRTM ver4.1 and GEODATA DEM-9S ver3 digital elevation models over Australia. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences 57, 3, 337-347.

Hong S.H., Wdowinski S., Kim S.W., Won J.S. (2010) – Multi-temporal monitoring of wetland water levels in the Florida Everglades using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Remote Sensing of Environment 114, 11, 2436-2447.

Hutchinson M.F. (1988) – Calculation of hydrologically sound digital elevation models. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Spatial Data Handling, Sydney, 117-133.

Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática (INEGI) (2012) Vector dataset 1:50,000.

Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática (INEGI) (2013) LiDAR DTM (Digital Terrain Model) 1:10,000.

Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática (INEGI) (2014) – Continuo de Elevaciones Mexicano CEM (versiones 1.0-3.0).

Ivanov V.I., Kruzhkov V.A. (1992) Evaluation of the optimal discretization step for a digital elevation model. Geodezia i Cartografia 5, 47-50.

Maune D.T. (2007) – Digital Elevation Model technologies and applications: the DEM user’s manual. Bethesda, Maryland, American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, 655 p.

Nelson A., Reuter H.I., Gessler P. (2009) DEM production methods and sources. In Hengl T., Reuter H. (Eds.): Geomorphometry, Concepts, Software, Applications. Developments in Soil Science, Vol. 33. Elsevier, Oxford.

Parrot J.-F. (1998) Newmiel. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2005) Transf_dxf_v2. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2006) Sum_cn_ha_dxf. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2011) – Binar_V2. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/mini/sof_1.php INDA: 03-2011-120112041501-01.

Parrot J.-F. (2012a) – Software DEMONIO (Digital Elevation Models Obtained by Numerical Interpolating Operations) . http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/parrot4.php INDA: 03-2012-120612205000-01.

Parrot J.-F. (2012b) – Brod4_mx. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2012c) – Hiatus. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2012d) – Miel4_mx. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2012e) – Net_curve2. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2012f) – Suav_mask. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2012g) – Superpos_rio. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F. (2013) – FROG_V2 (Fractal Research On Geosciences, Version 2). http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/parrot3.php INDA: 03-2014-022712194900-01.

Parrot J.-F. (2014a) – Modelos Digitales de Terreno. Internal publication. Instituto de Geografía, UNAM, Mexico.

Parrot J.-F. (2014b) – TLALOC_V2 (Tridimensional Landscape Analysis. Local Operating Computation). http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/parrot.php INDA: 03-2006-092112451400-01.

Parrot J.-F. (2014c) Gaussian_Lateral_Flooding. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Pérez-Vega A., Mas J.-F. (2009) – Evaluación de los modelos digitales de elevación obtenidos por cuatro métodos de interpolación. Investigaciones Geográficas. Boletín del Instituto de Geografía, UNAM, 69, 53-67.

Publighe G., Fava F., (2013) – DEM extraction from archive aerial photos: accuracy assessment in areas of complex topography. European Journal of Remote Sensing 46, 363-378.

Parrot J.F., Ramírez-Núñez C. (2012a) Crear_tabla. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.-F., Ramírez-Núñez C. (2012b) – New_fast_cauce. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Parrot J.F., Ramírez-Núñez C. (2012c) – RiverBodies. [MS-DOS module]. http://www.igg.unam.mx/sigg/investigacion/lage/que_hacemos/spn/plain_mde.php

Paul F., Huggel C., Kääb A. (2004) Combining satellite multispectral image data and a digital elevation model for mapping debris-covered glaciers. Remote Sensing of Environment 89, 510-518.

Ramírez-Núñez C., Parrot J.-F. (2014) – Flood simulation in the coastal plain of Coatzacoalcos (Veracruz, Mexico) using LiDAR. IGARSS, 2014, Québec, 1975-1978.

Rieger W. (1996) Accuracy of slope information derived from DEM-data. International Archives of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing 31, B4, 690-695.

Schiefer E., Gilbert R., (2007) – Reconstructing morphometric change in a proglacial landscape using historical aerial photography and automated DEM generation. Geomorphology 88, 167-178.

Taud H., Parrot J.-F., Álvarez R. (1999) – DEM generation by contour line dilation. Computers and Geosciences 25, 775-783.

Wechsler S. (1999) – Digital Elevation Model (DEM) Uncertainty: Evaluation and Effect on Topographic Parameters, ESRI User Conference 1999 Proceedings, San Diego, CA, July, 1999.

Wechsler S. (2000) – Effect of DEM uncertainty on topographic parameters, DEM scale and terrain evaluation. Ph.D. Thesis, State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Syracuse, New York, USA.

Wood J., (1996) – Scale-based characterization of digital elevation models. In Parker D. (Ed.): Innovations in GIS 3. Taylor and Francis, London, UK.

Young M. (1978) – Statistical characterization of altitude matrices by computer. Terrain analysis: Program documentation. Report 5 on grant DA-ERO-591-73-G0040. Durham, England, Department of Geography, University of Durham, 18 p.

Haut de page

Annexe

Version française abrégée

Les Modèles Numériques de Terrain (MNT) représentent un outil indispensable pour étudier des phénomènes dynamiques tels que les inondations. Il est nécessaire dans ce cas de disposer d’une représentation de la surface terrestre la plus précise possible. Les données LiDAR sont en principe susceptibles de répondre à cette problématique. Mais outre le fait qu’elles présentent encore quelques artéfacts, elles restent surtout peu disponibles au Mexique et il convient alors d’avoir recours à des données vectorielles pour engendrer des MNT à partir de courbes de niveau. Dans le cas des zones côtières qui sont plates et souvent affectées par des inondations, l’absence de données altimétriques entre le niveau de la mer et une première courbe de niveau correspondant généralement à une altitude de 10 mètres, représente un problème crucial. C’est surtout vrai dans la mesure où les données fournies par l’Institut National de Statistique, Géographie et Informatique (INEGI, Mexique) ne comportent pas de courbes de niveau correspondant à l’altitude 0, car toutes les étendues aquatiques, que ce soit la mer, les lacs ou les cours d’eau figurent sans référence altitudinale dans un ensemble de données spécifiques.

Toutes ces considérations et les besoins exprimés par la protection civile, nous ont amené à développer une procédure capable d’engendrer, malgré l’absence de données détaillées, un MNT qui puisse répondre à cette demande et permettre de réaliser à l’échelle régionale des simulations d’événements catastrophiques affectant les zones côtières du Mexique.

Le bassin côtier du fleuve Coatzacoalcos (Etat de Veracruz) est étudié à titre d’exemple (fig. 1). Le cours d’eau prend sa source au Sud de l’isthme de Tehuantepec, dans la Sierra Niltepec et se jette dans le Golfe du Mexique après un parcours de 325 km. Ce bassin côtier couvre 17 369km2 et est régulièrement affecté par de puissantes inondations. La région comprise entre le niveau de la mer et la première courbe de niveau correspondant à une altitude de 10 mètres représente plus de 35 % de la zone d’étude (fig. 2),

Comme le montre l’organigramme de la figure 3, le MNT engendré à partir de données vectorielles résulte de l’application d’un traitement comportant plusieurs étapes. La première consiste à intégrer les données relatives aux diverses étendues d’eau dans les données vectorielles regroupant les courbes de niveau ; on obtient de la sorte le bord de mer, ainsi que les berges des cours d’eau et la limite des méandres abandonnés (fig. 4A). Dans la mesure où toutes les données concernant les étendues aquatiques ne comportent aucune valeur d’altitude, il convient dans une seconde étape de leur attribuer leur réelle valeur hypsométrique. Cette opération se base sur un recodage binaire et une reclassification de la limite des surfaces aquatiques en vue de leur attribuer une valeur hypsométrique. A la fin de ces prétraitements on obtient 5 images binaires qui serviront de base pour réaliser le MNT final. Il s’agit de l’image de la surface des cours d’eau (fig. 4B) et de celle de leurs berges (fig. 4C), de l’image des étendues aquatiques (fig. 4D) et de celle de leurs périmètres (fig. 4E) et finalement du masque binaire des zones du bassin dont l’altitude est comprise entre 0 et 10 mètres et ne correspondent pas à une étendue d’eau (fig. 4F). À ce stade, on crée une image dont les pixels sont codés en format « integer4 » (4 octets ou 32 bits) ; cette image correspond au report sur un fond neutre (-999999) de l’altitude en mètres, décimètres, centimètres ou millimètres des courbes de niveau, bord de mer compris ; dans l’organigramme de la figure 3, cette image est nommée PI_C4. La quatrième étape concerne la définition de l’altitude des surfaces aquatiques ; elle utilise les 4 premières images binaires et comporte deux approches différentes. Il convient tout d’abord de séparer les cours d’eau des surfaces d’eau stagnante. L’altitude des berges fluviales est calculée en attribuant une valeur hypsométrique aux pixels que les décrivent ; il s’agit dans ce cas d’une procédure qui prend en compte la longueur et l’altitude minimale et maximale des extrémités du segment de berge à traiter. En ce qui concerne l’altitude des surfaces d’eau stagnante, la reclassification mentionnée auparavant permet de réaliser cette opération ; l’altitude d’un plan incliné décrivant à l’échelle régionale l’extension de la nappe aquatique sert de référence et il est ainsi possible de définir l’hypsométrie des surfaces isolées en prenant en compte soit la valeur altitudinale de cette nappe au centre de gravité de la surface, soit l’altitude minimale ou l’altitude maximale rencontrée dans cette surface. Le résultat partiel obtenu est reporté dans une image nommée WSA (fig. 5), image dont les pixels sont codés sur 4 octets. L’étape suivante permet d’attribuer une valeur hypsométrique aux pixels localisés dans le masque binaire des zones du bassin dont l’altitude est comprise entre 0 et 10 mètres. Entrent en jeu l’image des courbes de niveau (fig. 4A), le fichier nommé WSA, l’image des berges fluviales (fig. 4C), celle des périmètres des surfaces d’eau stagnante (fig. 4E) et l’image binaire de la zone comprise entre 0 et 10 mètres (fig. 4F). Pour chaque pixel situé dans le masque de la figure 4F, l’algorithme New_fast_cauce (Parrot and Ramírez-Núñez, 2012b) recherche la plus petite distance ds à la courbe de niveau d’altitude As qui est égale à 10 mètres dans le cas présent et la plus petite distance di entre ce point et le pixel le plus proche décrivant une berge fluviale ou le périmètre d’une surface aquatique (fig. 6). L’altitude inférieure Ai dépend de la valeur hypsométrique du point inférieur le plus proche. L’altitude Ap du pixel étudié est alors égale à :

Ap = Ai + [(As – Ai) x (di/d)] avec d = di + ds.

Le modèle numérique de la zone basse du bassin côtier ainsi obtenue se nomme FPA (fig. 7). Dans l’étape finale, les données issues du modèle des surfaces aquatiques (WSA) et le modèle FPA antérieur s’intègrent dans l’image provisoire PI_C4 des courbes de niveau. A ce stade, l’altitude des pixels qui conservent encore la valeur du fond neutre au sein d’une couche altitudinale comprise entre deux courbes de niveau successives d’altitude Ai et As, est calculée en utilisant la formule précédente en fonction des distances di et ds minimales. À l’aide d’une convolution au sein d’une fenêtre mobile de 3 × 3 pixels, un lissage basé sur une fonction b spline est finalement appliquée aux zones qui ne correspondent pas à une surface aquatique. La résolution au sol du MNT dépend du choix de l’utilisateur ; elle est ici de 5 mètres et par ailleurs l’échelle hypsométrique est en centimètres. Il est alors nécessaire de valider ce résultat. La précision d’un MNT dépend de divers facteurs et l’erreur quadratique moyenne (RMSE) d’élévation représente une méthode d’usage courant pour estimer cette précision. Pour ce faire, on utilise des points de référence d'altitude (Ivanov et Kruzhkov, 1992; Bolstad et Stowe, 1994; Wechsler, 1999), mais le nombre de ces points est généralement limité et il est difficile de considérer le MNT de référence comme une surface réelle (Florinski, 2012).

En fait, nous avons évalué la précision de notre MNT en calculant la moyenne quadratique de rugosité (RMSR) et en définissant un critère d'Homogénéité (H). Cet indice correspond à la différence entre 100 et le quotient multiplié par 100 de la moyenne des différences entre les valeurs de la rugosité calculée selon les lignes, les colonnes et l’ensemble de l’image et la moyenne de ces mêmes valeurs.

De plus, l'erreur quadratique moyenne (RMSE) a été calculée en fonction de la procédure proposée par Felícisimo (1994), procédure qui consiste à comparer chaque pixel du MNT à une surface locale calculée à partir de la valeur hypsométrique de ses voisins. Cette méthode, selon Florinsky (2012), représente une approche élégante de validation qui ne fait pas appel à des données de terrain dont le nombre de points est de toute façon limité.

Les résultats obtenus pour le RMSE et pour le RMSR apparaissent dans la table 1. Par ailleurs, ce qui représente une manière de pallier l’absence effective de données de terrain, la validation repose également sur une comparaison mettant en jeu un Modèle Numérique de Terrain LiDAR (MNT LiDAR) ayant la même résolution horizontale et verticale que le MNT engendré selon la technique décrite ci-dessus. Il est intéressant de noter que l'erreur quadratique moyenne ainsi que l'écart type du MNT que nous avons réalisé à partir de courbes de niveau sont plus faibles que dans le cas du modèle MNT LiDAR, montrant que celui-ci enregistre un niveau d'erreur plus élevé en relation semble-t-il avec des corrections manuelles locales provenant de l’usage de lidargrammétrie. En revanche, l´évolution de la rugosité calculée ligne par ligne est parfaitement comparable (fig. 8). En fait, une véritable comparaison entre les deux modèles nécessite d’utiliser la transformée de Fourier (fig. 9) en vue de lisser et d’éliminer les cordons alluviaux présents dans les zones internes des méandres.

Une dernière tentative de validation correspond à la réalisation d’une simulation d’inondation au niveau régional en utilisant respectivement le MNT provenant de la méthode décrite antérieurement et du MNT LiDAR qui correspond à une représentation de la surface topographique et qui est censé fournir des renseignements plus détaillés au niveau local. Les surfaces que recouvre l’inondation calculée en fonction de données pluviométriques sont dans les deux cas quasi-similaires (fig. 10). Seules des différences notables concernent l’estimation du volume correspondant aux surfaces calculées. Ces différences s’expliquent aisément en tenant compte de la différence de rugosité au fond du bassin ; ainsi le volume est-il plus faible dans le cas du modèle LiDAR en raison de la présence de bourrelets et cordons fluviaux que notre MNT ne peut structurellement pas mettre en évidence.

Les résultats de la validation montrent à l’évidence que le traitement proposé pour engendrer un MNT dans une région comprenant des zones côtières plates et étendues représente à l’heure actuelle un moyen efficace pour réaliser des simulations d’évènements tels que des inondations et répondre de la sorte à des actions de prévention dans des régions continuellement affectées par ces évènements. Il est par ailleurs possible d’effectuer ce type de traitement de manière simple et peu couteuse pour répondre à des problèmes similaires dans de nombreuses zones côtières des pays en voie de développement.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 – Area of Veracruz State, Mexico, used as the basis of a flood simulation. Fig. 1 – Zone d’étude dans l'Etat de Véracruz, Mexique, utilisée comme base de la simulation hydrologique.
Légende DEM interpolation (Parrot, 2012a) from dxf contour lines (INEGI, 2012). Interpolation du Modèle Numérique de Terrain (Parrot, 2012a) à partir d’un fichier dxf contenant les courbes de niveau (INEGI, 2012).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 704k
Titre Fig. 2 – Altitude ranges. Fig. 2 – Classes d'altitude.
Légende A: Superimposed areas on the shadowed DEM: dark gray, 0-10 m; light gray, 11-20 m. B: Surface percentage of hypsometric classes. A : Tranches d’altitude reportées sur un estompage du Modèle Numérique de Terrain : gris foncé : 0-10 m, gris clair : 11-20 m. B : Histogramme du pourcentage des surfaces correspondant aux tranches d’altitude.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 1,6M
Titre Fig. 3 – Flow chart for DEM production for coastal and fluvial plains. Fig. 3 – Organigramme de la production de MNT dans les plaines côtières et plaines alluviales.
Légende Software and algorithms used: Parrot (1998, 2005, 2006, 2011, 2012b-g, 2013, 2014a, 2014b) and Parrot and Ramírez-Núñez (2012a-c). Logiciels et algorithmes utilisés : Parrot (1998, 2011, 2012b-g, 2013, 2014b) and Parrot and Ramírez-Núñez (2012a-c).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 544k
Titre Fig. 4 Basic raster images for DEM generation. Fig. 4 – Images raster de base utilisées pour engendrer le MNT.
Légende A: Contour lines and water bodies (8 bits). B: Surface of the rivers. C: River banks. D: Water bodies. E: Perimeter of the water bodies. F: Remaining surface inside the flood plain (< 10 m). Note: Figures A, C and E correspond to a dilation (one iteration) to emphasize the contours.A : Courbes de niveau et étendues d’eau (8 bits). B : Surface couverte par les rivières. C : Périmètre des berges. D : Plans d'eau. E : Périmètre des plans d'eau. F : Surface restante à l'intérieur de la plaine inondable (< 10 m). Note : les contours des images A, C et D ont été dilatés pour des raisons de lisibilité.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 472k
Titre Fig. 5 – Recalculated altitudes of the surfaces of the water bodies. Fig. 5 – Altitude recalculée des étendues d’eau.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 116k
Titre Fig. 6 Example of interpolation. Fig. 6Exemple d'interpolation.
Légende As is the upper altitude (here always 10 m); Ai is the lower altitude of the nearest water body perimeter; ds is the distance As-Ap; di is the distance Ap-Ai; and Ap is the resulting altitude of the pixel. As correspond à l’altitude supérieure (dans le cas présent celle-ci est toujours égale à 10 m) ; Ai correspond à l'altitude inférieure dont la valeur dépend de celle du périmètre de la masse d’eau la plus proche ; ds correspond à la distance jusqu’à As et di à la distance jusqu’à Ai ; Ap est l'altitude résultant de l’interpolation pour le pixel étudié.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-6.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 140k
Titre Fig. 7 – Recalculated altitudes on the flood plain between 0 and 10 m without taking into account the altitude of the water bodies. Fig. 7 – Altitude recalculée de la plaine inondable entre 0 et 10 m, sans tenir compte de l’altitude des étendues d’eau.
Légende Grey-tones image of the FPA integer 4 file. L’image FPA est une image de 32 bits en teintes de gris.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-7.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 308k
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-8.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 16k
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-9.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 20k
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-10.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 20k
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-11.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 16k
Titre Fig. 8 – RMSR comparison between the generated DEM and the LiDAR DTM. Fig. 8 – Résultats pour le RMSR (root mean square roughness) des deux modèles numériques de terrain.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-12.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 144k
Titre Fig. 9 – Comparison between the generated DEM and the result of the application of the fast Fourier transform to the LiDAR DTM. Fig. 9 – Comparaison entre MNT et la transformée de Fourier appliquée au MNT LiDAR.
Légende A: LiDAR DTM. B: FFT application (frequency 5% elimination). C: Generated DEM. A : MNT LiDAR. B : Traitement de la transformée rapide de Fourier. C : MNT.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-13.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 616k
Titre Fig. 10 Flooded areas in the lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River for the two types of DEM used. Fig. 10 – Les zones inondées dans le bassin inférieur de la fleuve Coatzacoalcos pour les deux types de DEM utilisés.
Légende Black: LiDAR calculation; Light gray: area solely covered by the generated DEM; Dark gray: area common to the two calculations, LiDAR DTM and DEM. Noir : surface seulement couverte par LiDAR DTM ; gris clair : surface uniquement couverte par le MNT provenant du traitement ; gris foncé : calcul de la surface commune aux deux modèles digitaux (MNT créé et LiDAR DTM).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/10992/img-14.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 968k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Carolina Ramírez-Núñez et Jean-François Parrot, « Digital Elevation Model of coastal and flood plains obtained from vector data: an alternative method applied to the Coatzacoalcos fluvial plain (Mexico) », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement, vol. 21 – n° 2 | 2015, 163-174.

Référence électronique

Carolina Ramírez-Núñez et Jean-François Parrot, « Digital Elevation Model of coastal and flood plains obtained from vector data: an alternative method applied to the Coatzacoalcos fluvial plain (Mexico) », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement [En ligne], vol. 21 – n° 2 | 2015, mis en ligne le 01 janvier 2016, consulté le 16 décembre 2017. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/10992 ; DOI : 10.4000/geomorphologie.10992

Haut de page

Auteurs

Carolina Ramírez-Núñez

Posgrado en Ciencias de la Tierra – Instituto de Geología – UNAM – C.P. 04510 – México, Distrito Federal – Mexique (caulira@hotmail.com)

Jean-François Parrot

LAGE – Instituto de Geografía – UNAM – C.P. 04510 – México, Distrito Federal – Mexique (parrot.igg.unam.mx). Tél. : +00 (52) 55 56 230 222 (poste 45464).

Articles du même auteur

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Groupe français de géomorphologie

Haut de page
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Logo Groupe français de géomorphologie
  • OpenEdition Journals