Navigation – Plan du site
170
Flores, Jorge et Subrahmanyam, Sanjay

« The Shadow Sultan: Succession and Imposture in the Mughal Empire, 1628-1640 ». Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, 47/1 (2004), pp. 80-121.

Compte-rendu réalisé par Rudi Matthee

Entrées d’index

Haut de page

Texte intégral

1The authors trace the cloak-and-dagger-like career of the mysterious Sultan Dawar Bakhsh, or Bulaqi (Bulaghi), who pretended to be the son of Sultan Jahangir, and as such claimed the Mughal throne. According to some sources, he had perished in 1628 as part of the execution of multiple princes, but others claim that he survived and managed to escape the turmoil surrounding the succession of Jahangir. Whatever the truth of the story, in later years a person calling himself Bulaghi and claiming to be Jahangir’s son, surfaced, first in India, and later in Iran, where he found refuge at the court of Shah Safi I. Beyond approaching the story of Bulaghi from a number of angles, the article raises questions about the nature of imposture in an age rife with doubles and imposters – viz, the False Dimitri in Russia on the eve of the country’s Time of Troubles – taking advantage of troubled succession struggles to advance their claims.

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence électronique

Rudi Matthee. Flores, Jorge et Subrahmanyam, Sanjay, « « The Shadow Sultan: Succession and Imposture in the Mughal Empire, 1628-1640 ». Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, 47/1 (2004), pp. 80-121. », Abstracta Iranica [En ligne], Volume 27 | 2006, document 170, mis en ligne le 02 janvier 2007, consulté le 22 février 2019. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/abstractairanica/5952

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

Tous droits réservés

Haut de page