Skip to navigation – Site map

HomeNuméros21News and NotesThe Diphilos Dissertation Prize W...

News and Notes

The Diphilos Dissertation Prize Winners

Jaimee Uhlenbrock

Abstract

The Diphilos Dissertation Prize is a biennial monetary award of €1000 that is granted to a recent graduate student for an accepted dissertation that focuses on coroplastic material from the Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds from the Neolithic period through late antiquity. This Prize is awarded in support of the eventual publication of the dissertation.

Top of page

Full text

1In 2019 a new initiative was launched by the Association for Coroplastic Studies to support young researchers who have successfully completed a doctoral dissertation on a coroplastic topic. Called The Diphilos Dissertation Prize, after the late-Hellenistic coroplast Diphilos, this is a biennial monetary award of €1000 that is granted to a recent graduate student for an accepted dissertation that focuses on coroplastic material from the Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds from the Neolithic period through late antiquity. This Prize is awarded in support of the eventual publication of the dissertation. The name Diphilos is known from signatures and monograms found on late Hellenistic and early Roman terracotta figurines from Myrina in Asia Minor. It is believed that Diphilos may have been the proprietor of a coroplast’s workshop that eventually was active over several generations. Dissertations to be considered for the Diphilos Prize must be submitted within two years of acceptance by the relevant university, and applicants must be members of the Association for Coroplastic Studies at the time of application for the Prize.

2The first cycle of The Diphilos Dissertation Prize considered dissertations completed during the 2018 and 2019 academic years. Four applications were received, of which two were recommended for the final round of review. In an unexpected turn of events, the reviewers were unanimous in their recommendation that both dissertations were equally meritorious, although they were quite different in their approaches, and that each author should receive The Prize in full. So it is with great pleasure that we announce that one prize has been awarded to Sophie Féret for her dissertation “Statuettes en terre cuite de l’epoque hellenistique en Italie: production et variations,” Université de Paris I, Panthéon Sorbonne, 2018, and a second, but equal, prize has been awarded to Pauline Maillard, “Les terres cuites des Salines de Kition: étude d'un culte chypriote d'époque classique,” Université de Lausanne, 2019.

3In the following two contributions in this journal the prizewinners Sophie Féret and Pauline Maillard present a brief overview of their dissertations. The Association for Coroplastic Studies eagerly looks forward to seeing both of these excellent studies in print.

4For the next cycle of The Diphilos Dissertation Prize, doctoral dissertations focusing on a coroplastic topic that will be completed during the academic years 2020 and 2021 will be considered, with The Prize to be awarded in spring 2022.

Top of page

References

Electronic reference

Jaimee Uhlenbrock, « The Diphilos Dissertation Prize Winners », Les Carnets de l’ACoSt [Online], 21 | 2020, Online since 15 December 2020, connection on 21 January 2022. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/acost/2632 ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/acost.2632

Top of page

Copyright

Licence Creative Commons
Les Carnets de l'ACoSt est mis à disposition selon les termes de la licence Creative Commons Attribution - Pas d'Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 4.0 International.

Top of page
  • Logo Association for Coroplastic Studies
  • Logo DOAJ - Directory of Open Access Journals
  • OpenEdition Journals
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search