Navigation – Plan du site

Athenian Moldmade Bowls on Delos: Laumonier’s Sample

Des bols hémisphériques athéniens à Délos: les échantillons de Laumonier
Αττικοί καλουπωτοί σκύφοι στη Δήλο: Η οµάδα του Λαυµονιερ
Susan I. Rotroff
p. 567-692

Résumés

Parmi les milliers de bols hellénistiques hémisphériques à relief retrouvés à Délos se trouve un petit nombre de bols athéniens, mis de côté par Alfred Laumonier au cours de son travail sur les bols ioniens, bien plus nombreux. Toutes les catégories décoratives importantes sont représentées avec, en majorité, les bols à godrons. L’iconographie correspond à celle des bols retrouvés à Athènes, mais on trouve aussi des impressions de poinçons jusqu’ici inconnus. Beaucoup des fragments peuvent être attribués à des ateliers spécifiques. Ces fragments nous éclairent sur les procédés de production et en documentent une étape jusqu’ici inconnue, en même temps qu’ils témoignent de l’exportation de moules pour la production de bols « attiques » hors de l’Attique. Bien que plusieurs des bols soient arrivés dans l’île avant 167, la plupart sont des articles d’importation plus tardive, ce qui suggère que l’ouverture de ce nouveau marché a pu avoir des conséquences pour le développement de l’industrie céramique athénienne.

Haut de page

Notes de l’auteur

I owe a special debt of thanks to Annette Giros‑Peignard, who first introduced me to the Laumonier collection on Delos and suggested that I investigate it further; she also facilitated my work on the island in many ways. I am also grateful to Dominique Mulliez, former director of the French School at Athens, who granted me permission to study and publish these fragments, and to the anonymous reader of the manuscript, who saved me from many embarrassing errors. I would also like to express my thanks to several colleagues who provided access to comparative material: Eleni Zosi of the National Archaeological Museum at Athens; Panagiota Avgerinou of the Archaeological Museum at Megara; Guy Sanders and Ioulia Tzonou-Herbst at the Corinth Museum; and Jan Jordan and Sylvie Dumont at the Agora Excavations in Athens. Panagiotis Hatzidakis of the Greek Archaeological Service was unfailingly helpful in supplying information about material from the older excavations on Delos. The drawings are the work of Anne Hooton, to whose sharp eye I owe many insights; some of the inkings were completed by Tina Ross and myself. For the photographs, I thank Bob Lamberton and Vassilis Tsiairis, who between them devoted several weeks to recording this difficult material in difficult conditions. I am also grateful to Bob for his help in preparing the manuscript and illustrations for submission. My work was supported by generous grants from Washington University and from the Archaeological Institute of America.

Texte intégral

1The island of Delos is a treasure trove of the material culture of the Hellenistic period. As a bustling economic center, the town that developed there in the later Hellenistic period attracted a large and varied population that enjoyed the use of objects imported from all around the Mediterranean Sea. Among the most durable and most numerous are the ceramics, and this article is devoted to a small slice of that collection: moldmade (“megarian”) bowls imported from Athens.

  • 1 EAD XXXI, p. 1. Courby had spent much time on the island and participated in the great excavations (...)
  • 2 “Chronique des fouilles et découvertes archéologiques en 1956: Délos”, BCH 81 (1957), p. 710‑711, t (...)
  • 3 EAD XXXI.

2Two earlier projects aimed at the publication of this material. Early in the 20th c., Fernand Courby prepared a manuscript on the moldmade bowls found in the great excavations of 1904‑1914. It must have been in an advanced state by 1922, for he refers to his catalogue numbers in his Les vases grecs à reliefs, published in that year, but his manuscript was lost,1 and publication never took place. Courby’s work is documented only by a chapter in his 1922 book and the traces of some of the labels he affixed to the sherds. He died in 1932 without ever returning to the project. The material lay unheeded for a generation, until, in 1956, Alfred Laumonier began his study of the moldmade bowls found on Delos.2 By that time the collection had grown to gargantuan proportions, and Laumonier enlarged it yet further by the addition of newly excavated material, up through 1968. As is well known, he completed a first volume, dedicated to the thousands of bowls of Ionian manufacture and published in 1977,3 reserving the remainder of the collection for a planned second volume, which he never completed.

  • 4 P. Bruneau et al., L’îlot de la Maison des comédiens, EAD XXVII (1970), p. 240, no D 3 bis. A secon (...)
  • 5 More have come to light since Laumonier’s day: e.g., from the Aphrodision of Stesileos (Gros 2013, (...)

3Laumonier’s unpublished material fills four large trays in the storerooms of the Archaeological Museum on Delos, three dedicated primarily to the Athenian bowls, the fourth to the products of assorted other industries. The present article is limited to the Attic material, most of it identified either by the personal numbers that Laumonier assigned to the objects to facilitate his study, or by the numbers assigned by the French excavations of 1959‑1968. It is clear that some things have been removed from the trays since Laumonier’s time; for instance, a long‑petal bowl signed by Ptolemaios, named on a label in one of the drawers and published by Philippe Bruneau among bowls from the Îlot des comédiens, is no longer there.4 It is also clear that the contents of these trays do not exhaust the totality of the Athenian moldmade bowls on Delos.5 With over 400 pieces, however, they constitute a significant sample of Athenian imports to the island.

Athenian Moldmade Bowls

  • 6 For a fuller description of these features, see Agora XXII, p. 14‑15.
  • 7 Neutron activation analysis of a small sample of bowls from the Agora Excavations provides chemical (...)
  • 8 The only instances known to me are on Lemnos (in a production that is closely related to Attic, pos (...)

4Athenian moldmade bowls can be identified with a high degree of confidence on the basis of fabric, shape, and production details,6 as well as by their distinctive iconography. The clay is fine, without visible inclusions except for a small amount of fine mica. Although color is affected by firing temperature and soil conditions, the clay is usually of a warm reddish yellow tone, matching chips in the upper right quadrant of the 5YR page of the Munsell soil color chart and, unless burnt, never straying beyond the same quadrant of the 2.5YR and 7.5YR pages.7 The gloss is highly variable, sometimes a lustrous black, but more frequently dark gray or brown, or even completely red, and pronounced mottling is common. The surface tends to be slightly shiny, but it may be dull or marked with metallic patches. The shape is usually a deep bowl with a flattened bottom and steep sides, with a wheelmade rim extending well above the moldmade section, fairly straight in profile, and an outturned lip. A highly distinctive feature is the scraped groove that was almost always added below the lip and around the medallion; traces of red pigment (miltos or cinnabar) show that it was often tinted for contrast with the black gloss. This scraped groove is almost never found on bowls made elsewhere8 and so constitutes an important earmark of Attic production.

  • 9 Courby 1922, p. 332‑333, 360‑362.
  • 10 Thompson 1934.
  • 11 Thompson 1934, p. 458‑459.

5In chapter 20 of Les vases grecs à reliefs, Courby presented the first analysis of what we now know to be Athenian production: bowls distinguished from the bulk of the Delian material by their shiny gloss (in his terminology, bols à glaçure). He conjectured correctly that they were Attic on the basis of the very few Athenian pieces that had been published in his day. He devised the general classification of types that is still in use today, and his drawings of recurring motifs, some based on vessels found at other sites that still remain otherwise unpublished, provide a useful overview of the iconography. With no contextual evidence for dating, however, it is no surprise that Courby’s chronology missed the mark; he conjectured a span between the end of the IVth c. and the last quarter of the IIIrd for the figured bowls and believed that the long‑petal bowls were contemporary or even earlier.9 A little more than a decade later, in 1934, Homer Thompson was able to apply the evidence of archaeological contexts to the chronology of Hellenistic pottery,10 verifying the Attic identity of the bols à glaçure and placing the types in relative sequence (imbricate, floral, and figured before long‑petal), on the basis of three deposits at the Athenian Agora in which moldmade bowls occurred in large numbers. He dated the earliest bowls at the end of the first quarter of the IIIrd c. and the first long‑petal bowls just before the middle of the IInd c.11 Although his dates, too, have since been adjusted, Thompson’s view of the overall framework of development remains valid.

  • 12 Large numbers of fragments were published by Schwabacher (1941) and Edwards (1956). Smaller numbers (...)
  • 13 Agora XXII.
  • 14 Many fragments of Athenian moldmade bowls from Aigina (Smetana-Scherrer 1982) and from fills on the (...)

6The corpus of Attic material was expanded in the following years by the publication of material from sites in Athens and the Piraeus.12 Willy Schwabacher’s study of fragments from the German excavations at the Kerameikos concentrated on iconography, establishing models and identities for some of the figured motifs and tracing their occurrence within other productions. Roger Edwards’ publication of bowls from the Pnyx hill, which included many molds and workshop discards, threw light on the production process. My own 1982 monograph on the moldmade bowls from the Agora Excavations increased the number of published Attic bowls by over 350, made revisions to Thompson’s chronology (moving the date of the introduction of the bowls to ca. 225), and introduced the study of workshop groups to the Attic material.13 Since that time there have been only small additions to the bibliography.14 The present study constitutes the first substantial expansion of the published Attic corpus since the 1990s.

7Moldmade bowls were probably invented by Athenian potters and, on the basis of the dated deposits in which they occur, first appeared at the beginning of last quarter of the IIIrd c. It is conjectured that the first bowls were purely floral in decoration, like the extant metal bowls upon which the type was probably modeled, but all of the early types (with pine‑cone, imbricate, floral, and figured decoration) appear in the earliest deposits, so this hypothetical sequence cannot be confirmed. These early types, and especially figured bowls, are common in deposits of the first half of the IInd c., though they are largely displaced by long‑petal bowls after the middle of the century. In general, production can be divided into three chronological phases (though see p. 598‑601 below for possible adjustments):

  1. thin‑walled bowls with floral, figured, and imbricate decoration, with a great variety of detailed stamps in low relief (ca. 225‑175);
  2. thicker-walled bowls (primarily figured) with smaller, less detailed figures in higher relief, often derivative from stamps of phase 1 (ca. 175‑150);
  3. long‑petal bowls, their surfaces decorated by tall, thin petals with rounded tops, sometimes divided by columns of jeweling (chiefly ca. 150‑86).

8Production presumably came to an abrupt end at Athens with the Sullan sack in 86 B.C. Otherwise the dates are approximate.

Athenian Moldmade Bowls on Delos

  • 15 More elaborate vessels, such as amphoras, kraters, or filter‑jugs, are represented by only a few fr (...)
  • 16 For Laumonier’s numbering system, see EAD XXXI, p. 487.

9The collection upon which this study is based was culled from the contents of three trays in the Delos museum magazines in which Laumonier stored fragments of bowls that he identified as Attic.15 His opinions about what was Attic and what was not are documented by his numbering system, in which Attic bowls were assigned numbers in the 7000s.16 Some of the bowls so numbered can be excluded on the basis of fabric or iconography, and these do not appear in my catalogue. Conversely, I have included a handful bowls that Laumonier did not consider to be Attic (24, 45, 84, 210). I am confident of the Attic origins of most of the items in the catalogue, but I harbor doubts about a few; the reasons for my uncertainty are described in the catalogue. Scientific analysis could perhaps have resolved some of these doubts, but various factors militated against its application: the small size of the fragments, the cost of analysis, and the sense that the additional knowledge gained would not justify the necessary damage and expenditure.

  • 17 I found a total of 448 non-joining fragments or sections of bowls in Laumonier’s trays, 382 of whic (...)

10For the present study, I isolated 405 items from Laumonier’s trays, 366 of them certainly Attic and another 39 probably so.17 Most are single fragments, and no bowl survives in its entirety; the two most complete examples preserve only about half of the vessel (63, 149). Almost all of the fragments could be classified according to type, the best represented of which is long‑petal (59%), followed distantly by figured (21%) and imbricate (6%) (Table 1). Other types are represented by only a handful of fragments each. These identifications make it possible to construct a rough chronological profile of the sample, with most pine‑cone, imbricate, floral, and figured bowls dating before 150, and long‑petal bowls between ca. 150 and 86 B.C. Slightly more precision can be achieved for those bowls that can be attributed to a workshop.

Table 1 — Types of Athenian Moldmade Bowls in Laumonier’s Sample.

Type

Attic

Probably Attic

Total

percentage

Pine-cone

2

0

2

<1%

Imbricate

26

1

27

7%

Floral

5

1

6

1%

Figured

84

1

85

21%

Pine-cone, imbricate, floral, or figured [PIFF]

36

0

36

9%

[PIFF total]

[153]

[3]

[156]

[39%]

Long-petal

203

35

238

59%

Network

2

1

3

<1%

Semicircle

6

0

6

1%

Unknown

2

0

2

<1%

TOTAL

366

39

405

Bowls Attributed to Workshops

  • 18 For the criteria used for attribution, see Agora XXII, p. 25‑26.

11Analysis of minor motifs such as rim patterns, medallions, and filling motifs have made it possible to isolate cohesive groups within the corpus of Athenian bowls.18 The largest of these are probably to be identified as the output of individual workshops, while smaller groups (termed “classes”) may bear witness either to workshops whose products are poorly represented in the material at our disposal, or to discrete clusters within the oeuvre of the larger workshop groups. In the Delos material, attribution is impeded by the fact that the motifs are unclear on many of the fragments, either because the fragments themselves have been seriously abraded (e.g., 14, 26), or the punches (stamping tools) were poorly applied to the mold (e.g., 29), or the punches themselves or the molds that produced the bowls were worn. Nonetheless, a third of the fragments in Laumonier’s sample can be attributed to a workshop or class with varying degrees of assurance. These attributions assure the identification of these objects as Athenian and also help to date them more closely than would be possible otherwise.

12Two major workshops – the Workshop of Bion and Workshop A – functioned at the beginning of production at Athens, and their easily recognized products can be traced through the first quarter of the IInd c. A small group of bowls known as Class 1 (represented by a single piece at Delos) may belong to the later production of Bion’s workshop, dating in the second quarter of the IInd c. The lifespan of Workshop A seems to have been longer. The M Monogram Class may represent its output in the second quarter of the IInd c., and details preserved on some of the fragments on Delos strengthen the case that the shop was a significant producer of long‑petal bowls and hence continued to function beyond the middle of the century. Hausmann’s Workshop, represented by a relatively small group of products of remarkably high quality, cannot be dated precisely, but certainly belongs before the middle of the IInd c. Another producer appears in the second half of the IInd c., the Workshop of Apollodoros, its products largely limited to long‑petal bowls of high quality.

The Workshop of Bion (figs. 1‑9)

  • 19 For the shop, see Agora XXII, p. 26‑27; M. L. Lawall, A. Jawando, K. M. Lynch, J. K. Papadopoulos, (...)
  • 20 Rotroff 2013, p. 15‑17.
  • 21 Agora XXII, p. 30‑31.

13The Workshop of Bion takes its name from two signed fragments from the Athenian Agora; with over 100 inventoried bowls and fragments of many more stored with context pottery at the Agora, it is the best-attested of the potteries that manufactured moldmade bowls at Athens in the last quarter of the IIIrd and first quarter of the IInd c.19 It is also the earliest attested producer and possibly the originator of the moldmade bowl.20 The shop’s products are best represented at Athens in deposits of the first three decades of the IInd c., a span that probably represents the greatest intensity of its activity. Bowls of this period are characterized by thin walls and crisp motifs in low relief. Some later products of the shop may be represented by bowls with similar motifs but in higher relief and smaller size (Classes 1 and 2),21 but their poor workmanship makes them difficult to recognize.

14Thirty-nine bowls in Laumonier’s sample can be attributed to the Workshop of Bion with some certainty, and another seven were probably made in the shop. Among the dubitanda are fragments where the stamps are not quite identical in details (12) or size (1, 10, 27, 31) with stamps on known workshop products, a sign of possible mechanical copying and retooling by a different shop. Fragments 15 and 21 give a particularly good idea of the small, detailed stamps and the busy surface typical of this production. The collection includes examples of several of the shop’s most characteristic medallions: Athena Parthenos (e.g., 2526 and perhaps 27), a beautiful gorgoneion (28‑30), an eight‑petal rosette with hatched petals (32), and a plain nine‑petal one (33). Identifying rim patterns are represented by 21 and 3638, with the beading that is often present in this workshop.

  • 22 Agora P 36828 (unpublished). Stamps characteristic of the workshop on this piece include an old‑man (...)
  • 23 Agora XXII, p. 61, 70, nos 147, 209, pls. 27, 41, 78.
  • 24 A. Laumonier, “Bols hellénistiques à reliefs: un bâtard gréco-italien”, BCH Suppl. 1 (1973), p. 256

15Several pieces find very close parallels among bowls in Athens and represent some of the shop’s favorite motifs and compositional schemes: kraters flanked by rampant goats or silenoi (3, 810, 15), dancing satyrs (7, 23), Nikai (11), dramatic masks (45), marine thiasoi (1215), gods and heroes (1517), and hunts (21, 22). The Delos fragments also augment the picture of Bion’s production with stamps and compositions that are poorly represented or absent at Athens. The delicacy of its shape and decoration, an unparalleled rim pattern, and the matt, bluish gloss set 4 apart, although the stamps associate it firmly with Bion’s Workshop. The dancing Erotes on 6 rarely occur in Athens. Of special interest is a group of three bowls with an elaborate floral motif combining fronds and volutes and reaching from the medallion to the rim (the clearest impression is on 18, though more of the stamp is preserved on 19). The motif is known to me in only a single example at Athens, where the stamp is identical to that of 18. The three bowls on Delos illustrate the progressive degeneration of the stamp, with details clear on 18, less so on 19, and substantially effaced on 20. In composition and general aesthetic these bowls are very unlike the usual products of the workshop of Bion, but they can be attributed to it on the basis of linking stamps: the characteristic goats of 18 (only the feet are preserved) and the medallion of 19, as well as stamps on the single example at Athens.22 The occurrence of the frontal Nike on 20 presents a puzzle, since the two bowls at the Athenian Agora where she appears have been attributed tentatively to Workshop A.23 A reassessment of the original attributions provides evidence that the two Agora bowls may come instead from the Workshop of Bion: one has beading around the medallion, a common treatment in the Workshop of Bion but very rarely encountered in Workshop A; the other bears an Eros sprinting to the left, attested in Bion’s shop by 6. It is also true that larger stamps, like the Nike, often appear in seemingly identical form in more than one workshop and thus cannot provide a firm basis for attribution. As Laumonier pointed out long ago, punches could be borrowed, bought, or stolen,24 and the larger and more distinctive the motif, the greater the likelihood of such events. Given the derivative nature of 20 witnessed by the form of its fern, this could be a bowl made by another atelier that “lifted” the Nike from an existing bowl. It must also be remembered that these “workshops” are modern constructs based simply on degrees of similarity and difference between groups of bowls. These groups may reflect different and competing pottery establishments (the usual hypothesis), but alternatively might be ascribed to different artisans working in the same shop with different tools or at slightly different times. It goes without saying that the actual relationships among such groups remain a matter of complete conjecture.

  • 25 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 61, no 147, pls. 27, 78.

16Some fragments come from very fresh molds, suggesting a date near the beginning of production (e.g., 9, 15, 17, 21, 2436), no later than the first quarter of the IInd c., and they were probably imported to the island before Delos came under Athenian control in 167. Motifs lacking in detail (as on 11, for example) indicate that others were made well on in the shop’s history, close to 175 or later. A comparison of the Nike stamp on 20, where most of the details have been effaced, with the fresh stamps on bowls in Athens25 attests to the derivative nature of the Delian piece, which may date after ca. 175.

Workshop A (figs. 10‑16)

  • 26 See Agora XXII, p. 28‑29 for a full account of the workshop.
  • 27 For recurring rim and medallion motifs, see Agora XXII, pl. 98.

17Workshop A was the other major maker of moldmade bowls at Athens in the earliest period of production.26 It is less liberally represented than the Workshop of Bion, with 86 pieces in the Agora inventory. At Delos, 30 fragments can be associated with this shop with certainty, another 12 with less assurance, due to the small amount preserved (41, 4552) or the blurriness of the stamps (44, 50, 67). The certain attributions rest in part on characteristic rims and medallions.27 Workshop A favored rims with a true guilloche or a well-sculpted egg and dart below and a frieze of tiny palmettes flanked by dolphins above; sometimes the two registers are divided by a row of jeweling. The classic scheme appears on 56, 59, and 60, but its elements can also be recognized on 46 and 53. Rosettes are a recurring choice for the medallion, including a large ten‑petal one (44) and a double rosette with four petals inside and eight outside (40, 57, 58, 66). The workshop produced a fine series of imbricate bowls with large, carefully placed leaves or palmettes, documented by a few fragments on Delos (39, 40, 42, 43, and perhaps 41); imbricate lotus or palmette is also a common calyx pattern (58 and probably 45 and 52). Among figured scenes can be recognized sleek and well‑fed rampant goats flanking a krater, accompanied by hovering Erotes (4649, and probably 50), Eros riding a goat (54), and hunters (55, 56). A single overturned kalathos identifies the narrative on the wall of 57 as the abduction of Persephone. The Delos material adds one new motif to the repertoire of the shop: two confronted Erotes, documented only by the tops of their wings on 53.

18Some of the bowls have stamps with crisp outlines and they (or the molds that produced them) should date within the first phase of the shop, before ca. 175 (e.g., 42, 43, 56, 57). Small details suggest, however, that some were made later: the unusual use of beading on 50 (assuming it is from the workshop), and the absence of the characteristic lower part of the rim pattern on 53. Although these differences could be the result of careless copying by a rival shop or an inept artisan, they more likely document a loosening of the original strict traditions of the shop in the course of time.

  • 28 S. IRotroff, “The Long‑Petal Bowl from the Pithos Settling Basin”, Hesperia 57 (1988), p. 87‑93.

19The most interesting feature within this material, however, is the recurrence on long‑petal bowls of medallions typical of Workshop A: a small, eight‑petal rosette (found in nine examples, e.g., 6165), a double four‑petal rosette (67), and a rosette with eight petals outside and four inside (two examples, e.g., 66). The instance of the single eight‑petal rosette has been recognized before, providing important evidence for the continuity of Workshop A over the transition from the earlier types to the long‑petal bowl, which was introduced gradually in the course of the first half of the IInd c.28 The two other medallions strengthen the case for Workshop A as a continuing producer of long‑petal bowls in the second half of the IInd c. Furthermore, the eight‑petal rosette documents wear and retooling of the stamp; compare the crisp image of 61 and 64 with the blurred outlines of 65, bearing witness to the long history of the motif. Workshop A must have continued to make long‑petal bowls for some time.

Hausmann’s Workshop (figs. 17‑20)

  • 29 Hausmann 1959, p. 26‑27, n. 107, pls. 2‑7.
  • 30 Hausmann 1959, p. 108‑109, n. 106 and 107. Twenty‑two of these belong in the core series discussed (...)
  • 31 Among the additions are four published in Agora XXII, p. 65‑67, 73, nos 181, 192, 233, 234, pls. 33 (...)

20A small group of bowls, named for Ulrich Hausmann, who first drew attention to their integrity as a workshop group,29 stands out from the mass of Attic production on the basis of the fine design of the figures and ornament that decorate them. In total, Hausmann attributed 32 bowls to this group, and, although some of these can now be excised from his list,30 others have been recognized or discovered since he wrote, more than doubling the numbers.31

  • 32 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 73, no 233, pls. 45, 84.
  • 33 An eleven‑frond palmette with the tips of the fronds turned upwards, and a seven‑frond palmette wit (...)
  • 34 This medallion occurs on at least eight bowls in the workshop; e.g., Athens NM 2099 (Hausmann 1959, (...)
  • 35 The others are Athens NM 2347 (Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 60:3c) and E1091 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 7:2), F (...)
  • 36 Most easily observed on Hausmann 1959, pls. 2, 4‑9.

21Several features make these bowls easy to recognize. The rim patterns are very finely crafted and limited to a small number of designs. The lower element is almost always a simplified guilloche made up of heart‑shaped spirals, uniquely distinguished by a tiny bead inside the point of the heart (68). A few examples substitute an egg and dart bordered at the top by a line of beading (70, 72).32 The upper register almost always consists of pairs of double spirals from which two alternating forms of palmette spring.33 The distinctive guilloche and palmettes are unique to this workshop and provide an infallible clue to attribution. Medallions are more variable, but some bear a profile head of a young Herakles wearing a lion helmet, probably taken from a coin or a gem.34 This or any other profile is unparalleled as a medallion motif in the Attic corpus and again makes this group stand out from the body of Athenian moldmade bowls. Another highly unusual medallion is the frontal face of a bearded man, known to me on four of Hausmann’s bowls, including one on Delos (73).35 Other medallions, however, are conventional: various rosettes and a gorgoneion (e.g., 77). Calyxes usually consist of one to three rows of acanthus leaves (e.g., 7476) or pointed leaves with fine veins.36

22Many of these bowls also stand out for the monumentality of the figures, both large in scale and boldly conceived. While figures on the general run of Athenian bowls rarely exceed a height of 4.0 cm, those on bowls of Hausmann’s Workshop are often larger, sometimes as much as 5.5 cm in height (e.g., the warrior on the left of 68). Many are arranged in complex and unusual poses and executed in considerable detail. Moreover, while a few of the motifs that occur on these bowls are standard throughout the Attic repertoire, others are unique to this small corpus: e.g., Apollo and Artemis seated on a lion‑footed bench, an elaborate tripod, a commanding Pan holding a lagobolon, a warrior riding a bull, and a series of stamps showing vignettes of single combat between a Greek and an amazon. Even when the motifs themselves are common ones, like rampant goats flanking kraters, they are generally larger and more carefully worked on these bowls than on others.

  • 37 Courby 1922, p. 346, fig. 71:28a, 28b, 28g, 28h, 28n. For comparanda, see the individual entries in (...)
  • 38 NM 2345 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 7:1). See also drawings in Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 61:1 and, less attra (...)
  • 39 Hausmann 1959, p. 108, n. 107, under no 27.
  • 40 As has also been recognized by O. Deubner (Hellenistische Apollogestalten [1934], p. 65, no 35) and (...)
  • 41 G. Kawerau, A. Rehm, Das Delphinion in Milet, Milet: Ergebnisse der Ausgrabungen und Untersuchungen (...)
  • 42 B. V. Head, Historia Numorum (1911), p. 333, fig. 188; SNG Danish National Museum, Epirus-Acarnania(...)
  • 43 J. Marcadé, Au musée de Délos: Étude sur la sculpture hellénistique en ronde bosse découverte dans (...)
  • 44 The position of Artemis, though reversed, is also found on a Delian seal (F.‑M. Boussac, Les sceaux (...)
  • 45 See, for instance, the Delphic tripod on coins of Croton, C. M. Kraay, M. Hirmer, Greek Coins (1966 (...)
  • 46 Agora XXII, p. 72‑73, no 231, pl. 45 (view A), and P 31700 (unpublished). The bow and quiver are ab (...)

23With 12 examples, the Delos excavations have produced the largest excavated collection of bowls of this class. Three show amazonomachies (6870). Most of their stamps are known elsewhere on more complete bowls and are illustrated in Courby’s stamp compendium,37 but the nude warrior on the right side of 68 and the warrior with an oval shield on the left side of 70 are new members of the repertoire. The rampant goat and krater that appear on 71 are very common in the workshop, and traces of another hallmark motif are visible at the left edge of the fragment: the tail of a tritoness swimming left and the wingtip of the pipe‑playing Eros who rides on her coils. Enough is preserved of 74 to recognize it as a mold brother of a bowl in the National Museum at Athens,38 with a nude male figure lounging on a lion‑footed bench, a frontal figure to his left, and traces of a maenad mounted on a goat yet further to the left. Among these, the reclining nude is of special interest. The complete bowl in the National Museum shows a languid figure who drapes his right arm over his head in the classic gesture of weariness or lassitude; he leans on a short rod or staff as if it were a crutch, and gasps a curved object in his left hand. Hausmann identified him as Dionysos,39 and the gesture of the right arm is one that Dionysos often makes. Here, however, there is no doubt that we have to do with Apollo.40 A closely similar figure, accompanied by a tripod, laurel tree, serpent, and an omphalos, is pictured on a late Roman relief from the theater at Miletos. There it is clear that the short staff‑like object propped under the god’s left armpit is a quiver, and the curved object in his left hand is a bow. A similar figure appears again on Roman coins, all images probably representing a late Hellenistic statue of Apollo that stood in the Delphinion at Miletos.41 The Apollo of the bowls deviates in details from the Milesian figures: the position of his legs is reversed and he sits on a lion‑footed throne rather than a rocky outcrop. These details are documented, however, in other Hellenistic images. Apollo sits on a lion‑footed throne with his left leg extended on the reverse of coins of the Akarnanian confederacy, dated before 167, though his upper body is differently positioned.42 A marble statue from the Stibadeion on Delos, convincingly identified by Marcadé as Apollo, though incomplete, appears to combine all the features of the stamp on the bowl.43 The identity of the god is further confirmed by his appearance on another bowl in the series (73), where he is paired with Artemis.44 The divinities sit enthroned in mirrored positions on either side of an elaborate tripod, no doubt the Delphic tripod itself, for it shares the fillets and lion feet that appear on other depictions of this sacred object.45 The Delphian connection is reiterated on a tiny stamp on two bowls in Athens, where Apollo sits beside the tripod in a similar pose.46

  • 47 Athens NM 2099 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 6:1; Benndorf 1869-1883, pl. 59:3).

24The Apollo and Artemis bowl at Delos bears multiple subsidiary stamps that confirm its association with Hausmann’s workshop: the bearded man of the medallion, the small acanthus leaves of the calyx, and the birds flying left in the field. Its fabric and workmanship, however, are not typically Attic. Instead of thick, lustrous gloss, the coating of this bowl is dull dark brown and slightly grainy to the touch, something that is not frequently encountered in the Attic corpus. The bowl also lacks the scraped groove around the medallion, a feature that is virtually never omitted from Attic bowls dating before the middle of the IInd c. The tripod is identical in size and details to that on 72, a fragment on which the characteristic rim patterns of Hausmann’s Workshop survive, and it is also found on a complete bowl in the National Archaeological Museum at Athens that is undoubtedly a product of the workshop.47 The Apollo figure is slightly smaller than the one on the National Museum bowl and its mold brother (74) on Delos (the distance from the right knee to the right heel is 1.63 cm, in comparison to 1.85 cm on 74), but the difference is not so great as to suggest it was impressed by a punch that had been reproduced mechanically from the original. More likely the discrepancy results from the use of a different clay, more prone to shrinkage than standard Attic fabric.

  • 48 Athens NM 2123 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 2:1), 2125. See also Mainz 3070 (T. Kraus, Megarische Becher im (...)
  • 49 Most closely similar to London BM 1878, 1019.363 (S. Weston, [n. 31], p. 113‑114, pl. 10), but the (...)
  • 50 Although poorly impressed, they resemble the leaves in the calyx of Athens NM 2099 (Hausmann 1959, (...)

25Similar anomalies may be noted on some of the other bowls assigned to Hausmann’s Workshop on the basis of their stamps. For example, a bowl in the Athens National Museum also lacks scraped grooves and is covered with a dull and mottled gloss of poor quality; others, also lacking the scraped groove, have a widely outturned rim of a form alien to the Attic repertoire.48 Similar deviation from Attic norms is represented by a Delian fragment that at first sight hardly seems Attic, much less a product of Hausmann’s Workshop (77). Its fabric is coarse compared to Attic bowls, with many small white inclusions, its gloss is dull and brown, and it lacks a scraped groove around the medallion. That medallion, however, bears a round‑faced gorgoneion with shaggy hair parted in the middle, apparently retooled but similar in form and size to the medallions of several bowls of Hausmann’s Workshop,49 and the leaves of the calyx conform to a rather tentative small acanthus frequently found in the class.50 Only the lower parts of the figures above the calyx are preserved, but they are consistent with typical motifs of the workshop: Athena striding to the right, and goats flanking a krater. Thus, despite the unusual fabric and the poor quality of the bowl, it is apparently a product of Hausmann’s Workshop.

  • 51 G. R. Edwards, Corinthian Hellenistic Pottery, Corinth VII.iii (1975), p. 168, no 800, pl. 67.

26The most likely explanation for this variation in quality and fabric is that the bowls in question were manufactured elsewhere, using Athenian molds but local materials. In this context, it is interesting to note that the Artemis, the characteristic dotted guilloche, and an equally distinctive bird with a wreath–all familiar from the Hausmann corpus–occur on a bowl found at Corinth and to all appearances made of Corinthian clay.51 It may be that the export of molds for the manufacture of bowls elsewhere was a repeated occurrence, at least within this class.

  • 52 Kassel private collection, Athens NM 2348, 2349, and 2119 (Hausmann 1959, nos 1, 21‑23, pls. 8, 9; (...)
  • 53 The only certain instances of shared stamps that I have encountered are on Athens NM 2582 (Benndorf(...)
  • 54 Athens NM 2348, 2349, 2119 (Hausmann 1959, pls. 8:2, 9:1, 2).
  • 55 Karlsruhe Landesmuseum B 2686 (CVA Karlsruhe 1 [Germany 7], pl. 31 [329]:10; Hausmann 1959, pl. 3).
  • 56 Schwabacher 1941, p. 186, pl. II A 1.
  • 57 Schwabacher 1941, p. 191‑193; G. Siebert, Recherches sur les ateliers de bols à reliefs du Péloponn (...)

27Some of the bowls in Hausmann’s workshop, while retaining the distinctive dotted guilloche for the lower rim pattern, replace the palmettes of the upper pattern with a variety of alternating motifs: boukranion and phiale or rosette, or rosette and flying Eros or bird.52 The stamps on their walls are often smaller, of the more usual scale of figures on Athenian moldmade bowls, and there is only limited overlap with the repertoire of the bowls with the palmette rim pattern.53 Three bowls of this series (two from a single mold) show Eros and human huntsmen attacking a boar,54 a scene that is represented, with the same stamps, on a large fragment from Delos (78, where unfortunately most of the rim pattern is missing). The boukranion and phiale motif known from a complete bowl in Karlsruhe55 occurs on a small rim fragment from Delos (79). The wall preserves the highly conventional scene of a woman decorating a trophy, precisely paralleled on another complete bowl, now lost but once in a private collection in Kassel.56 Although the motif occurs in many industries and even on other sorts of objects,57 both the Kassel and the Delos stamp preserve the fillets that fall from the woman’s wreath–absent from most iterations on Athenian bowls–and in both the motif is flanked by larger wreaths. There is no doubt the two come from the same shop.

  • 58 Agora XXII, p. 28.
  • 59 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 56, nos 103‑105, pls. 18, 75.
  • 60 Agora XXII, p. 47, no 20, pls. 4, 98; the same boukranion forms the basis of the attribution of fra (...)
  • 61 Very few of these rim stamps are well preserved; the best published images are Hausmann 1959, pls.  (...)
  • 62 For good photographs of the motif within the core series of Hausmann’s Workshop, see Hausmann 1959, (...)

28In my publication of the moldmade bowls from the Athenian Agora, I explored the possibility of a link between Hausmann’s bowls and the much larger but more conventional body of material produced in the workshop of Bion.58 There are a number of intriguing similarities, including a guilloche with the same neatly rounded design as that of Hausmann’s Workshop (though, lacking the characteristic dot, it cannot have been made with the same tool).59 After having examined the details both of the fragments on Delos and of the large collection of bowls of Hausmann’s Workshop in the National Museum at Athens, however, I have serious doubts about this connection. This larger body of evidence makes it clear that the acanthus leaf that I once thought linked the two groups comes from two different punches. Bion’s acanthus is delicate and frilly, and always in low relief, while Hausmann’s is bolder, in higher relief, and differs in details. A boukranion alternates with rosettes on bowls of Bion’s workshop,60 but, as far as one can tell from the poor impressions that survive, it is long and thin, with prominent eye‑sockets (see fragment 2), in contrast to the broader skull and simpler outline of Hausmann’s stamp (79).61 A beautiful gorgon decorates the medallion in both productions, but a close look reveals that the stamps are different; Bion’s gorgoneion has fuller hair, the proportions and architecture of her face are slightly different, and knotted snakes appear below her chin (compare 77, of Hausmann’s core group, with 28, from Bion’s Workshop). A small, eight‑petal rosette occurs as a filling motif in both groups, but I have not been able to convince myself that it must come from the same punch.62 The relationship between the two groups thus remains, so far, impossible to define.

  • 63 Courby 1922, p. 338; Hausmann 1959, p. 27.
  • 64 For the chronology of the introduction of figured bowls (which occur as early as any in archaeologi (...)
  • 65 The date was based on a fragment found at the Athenian Agora and attributed by Hausmann to the grou (...)
  • 66 Agora XXII, p. 65‑66, n181, pl. 33 from deposit C 20:2.
  • 67 Agora XXII, p. 66, no 182, pl. 33, from the Middle Stoa building fill; for the revised date of the (...)
  • 68 On a bowl in Athens (NM 2099), antithetical figures of an archaistic Athena Promachos flank and gua (...)

29Both Courby and Hausmann concluded that these were the very first figured bowls to be made.63 Neither offered any arguments in support of this assertion, but it was presumably based on the high quality and large size of the figures and the coherent compositions in which they were arranged, combined with the principle that a type should decline from an original high point. A full study of the workshop would be necessary in order to pronounce on the likelihood of this hypothesis, but there are some reasons for doubt. If it is correct, the shop must have begun producing these bowls well before the end of the IIIrd c., by which time figured decoration was well established at Athens.64 Hausmann proposed a date in the last quarter of the IIIrd and the early IInd c., on the basis of arguments that must now be discounted.65 As far as I am aware, the earliest context for one of its products is an Athenian deposit that was closed around 150.66 A deposit of some 20 years earlier, however, contained a bowl bearing a tritoness closely related to a stamp of the workshop and presumably modeled on it,67 suggesting that the bowls were in production by about 170. I have suggested elsewhere, on the basis of the prominent position of the Delphic tripod on some bowls of this workshop (at Delos, 72 and 73), along with other iconographic features, that the bowls may demonstrate an interest in the close relationship between Athens and Delphi, possibly reflecting Athens’ involvement in the reorganization of the Delphic Amphictyony in the mid‑180s.68 In that case, their unique qualities would be the result of a personal commission by one of the prominent Athenians involved in that reorganization. Further study would be required to determine whether or not this conjecture has any value.

  • 69 Schwabacher 1941, p. 197, pl. I B 9 (Kerameikos); Courby 1922, p. 357 refers to a bowl that he saw (...)
  • 70 H. B. Walters, Catalogue of the Greek and Etruscan Vases in the British Museum IV, Vases of the Lat (...)
  • 71 The only published example among these is Megara Archaeological Museum A 221 (LIMC VIII.1, p. 105; (...)
  • 72 Benndorf (1869‑1883, p. 117) gave Megara as the purported provenience of all of the Hausmann bowls (...)
  • 73 A. Furtwängler 1883‑1887 (n. 69), p. 799‑801, nos 2887‑2890; CVA Musée Scheurleer 1 [Netherlands 1] (...)

30It remains to consider why so many bowls of Hausmann’s Workshop are present on Delos. The 12 examples account for 14% of the figured bowls in the sample, while the three excavated at the Athenian Agora make up less than 1% of the inventoried figured bowls there, in the land where they were supposedly manufactured. Although we can add one more from the Kerameikos, and reportedly one from Eleusis,69 the showing of the group on its native soil is unimpressive. Among those in museum collections, only three are said to have come from Athens or Attica.70 At least four have been excavated in graves at Megara, and fragments of several were found at Corinth and on Aigina.71 Reported proveniences are remarkably far‑flung: many are said to have come from Megara,72 but two from Crete, and one each from Thebes, Kythnos, and Egypt.73 Taken together with the fragments on Delos, this suggests that these bowls participated to an unusual degree in the pottery export market.

Attributed bowls of the second quarter of the IInd c. (figs. 21, 22)

  • 74 Agora XXII, p. 30.
  • 75 Agora XXII, p. 29.

31Although at any one time in the history of moldmade bowls there is substantial variation in quality, bowls of the second quarter of the IInd c. are generally distinguished by thicker walls, higher relief, and smaller stamps with less detail or with traces of retooling. Reduced detail makes it difficult to attribute fragments of this sort, but Laumonier’s sample preserves examples of two groups of bowls from this period: a fragment of a bowl of Class 1 (80), probably the later output of the Workshop of Bion;74 and seven or eight of the M Monogram Class, probably products of Workshop A (8186).75 The latter group can be recognized from a distinctive goat stamp, retooled so that the animal’s body presents a chevron pattern (81, 82), accompanied by flying Erotes with masks very similar to those on bowls of Workshop A. Also characteristic is a large acanthus leaf (8384) and a double six‑petal rosette (84, 85). The Delos collection includes a rare example of this medallion on a long‑petal bowl (86). If the M Monogram Class does indeed represent later output of Workshop A, this further strengthens the evidence that the shop produced long‑petal bowls and continued to produce pottery until the middle of the IInd c. and probably beyond.

The Workshop of Apollodoros (figs. 23‑26)

  • 76 Agora XXII, p. 37.
  • 77 Agora XXII, p. 84‑85, nos 338 and 341, pls. 61, 87 lack the scraped groove, but it occurs on nos 33 (...)
  • 78 Schwabacher 1941, p. 218, no 1, pl. VII A 11; Edwards 1956, p. 106, no 109, pl. 49.

32Two long‑petal bowls (87, 88) bear the signature Ἀπολλοδώρου in relief (showing that it had been inscribed in the mold) and retrograde, running up a petal from bottom to top. On 87 the letters are large enough to be read easily, but the signature on 88 is barely visible; the letters must have been inscribed with a fine point, and it is difficult to imagine their intended audience. This signature also occurs on four bowls at the Athenian Agora, where three more vessels can be associated with the shop on the basis of the repeated medallion, a double six‑petal rosette.76 Long petals were the preferred decoration, usually alternating with columns of jeweling topped by a small bud growing from a calyx. Clay and gloss point to Attic manufacture, even though 87 lacks the scraped groove below the rim that is always present on earlier Athenian bowls. Several bowls from this workshop found at Athens also lack this feature, but it does occur on one signed bowl, which allays doubts about local manufacture.77 Molds from the Pnyx and from the Kerameikos with columns of dotted jeweling topped by a bud also support Athenian manufacture.78

  • 79 I know of only one example of this detail in another industry (C. Domăneanţu, Les bols hellénistiqu (...)

33Clues to attribution are sparse in this simply decorated material, but the presence of details documented on signed bowls, both on Delos and at Athens, allows the tentative assignment of 25 additional fragments to this workshop. Often the jewels have a tiny relief dot at their centers (87, 89, 90, 96101), a rare feature that may be characteristic of this shop.79 The signed fragment 88 shows, however, that plain jeweling was also used. The lotus bud that tops the columns of jeweling (8792) may also be limited to the shop, replaced by other manufacturers with different motifs (148, 149, 151154, 156, 167169).

  • 80 Agora XXII, p. 48, 85, nos 35, 341, pls. 6, 61, 87.
  • 81 P 37034 (unpublished).
  • 82 For pale Attic fabric, see Agora XXIX, p. 10; for a moldmade bowl in this fabric, see Agora XXII, p (...)
  • 83 Thompson 1934, p. 383, nD 41, fig. 72.

34Products of Apollodoros at the Agora are distinguished by an unusual double six‑petal rosette.80 The ends of the outer petals are straight, rather than curved, and thickened to indicate upturned tips, and a longitudinal line divides each petal in half. The petals of the inner rosette are rounded and spring from a button center. The outer rosette measures about 2.4 cm in diameter. A stamp with the same characteristics occurs on several fragments on Delos. On 93 and 94 it is slightly smaller (diam. 2.2 cm). In terms of fabric, the appearance of the two is quite different, one soft and red‑glazed, the other harder and bearing a more durable brown gloss, but this is not beyond the variation that can be attributed to firing and burial conditions. A fragment bearing a medallion identical in details, size, and fabric to 94 has also come to light in Athens,81 so that we can at least say that this degree of variation is also present in the Athenian corpus. The same complex rosette also appears in a larger size (diam. 2.75‑2.85 cm) on three fragments (e.g., 95, 96), one of them (96) with dotted jeweling. Again there is variation in the fabric; 96 falls within normal Attic limits, while the fabric of 95 is pale, though not unparalleled in Attic products.82 This larger rosette is also found on a bowl at Athens, where it is combined with swirling long petals and dotted jeweling.83

  • 84 Thompson 1934, p. 406, no E 78, fig. 95b.

35This same jeweling, if it can be taken as a reliable mark of the shop, forges a link to several more fragments and to another medallion, a double rosette with the unusual combination of seven petals outside and six inside. Four examples have come to light on long‑petal bowls on Delos (e.g., 97, 98), all of which also share a detail of firing, a red stacking circle on the floor. In the best impressions the stamps preserve considerable detail, including fine striations on the outer petals. The shapes of the petals are similar to those of the six‑petal double rosette of Apollodoros, but here in negative: the tips of the petals, instead of protruding in relief, are deeply indented. This and the remarkable crispness of the image suggest that the motif was stamped directly onto the bowl. The edge of the same stamp can be also recognized on a bowl with semicircle and imbricate decoration (102), perhaps adding another decorative scheme to the shop’s repertoire. Three final pieces can be associated with the group on the basis of the dotted jewel: 99, where the column of jeweling is inventively topped by a tiny sphinx, perched on two jewels set side by side; and two small fragments where the petals swirl around the wall (e.g., 101). The sphinx motif is unique, as far as I am aware, though the double dotted jewel appears on a concentric-semicircle bowl at Athens.84 The combination of swirling petals with dotted jeweling is documented in Athens on the bowl with the large double-rosette medallion discussed above.

  • 85 Agora XXII, p. 84‑85, nos 335, 338 pls. 60, 61 (signed fragments found in Sullan destruction debris (...)
  • 86 For a current assessment of the date Thompson’s Group D, see Agora XXXIII, p. 361, under H 16:4.

36The combined evidence of bowls from Athens and Delos indicates, thus, that the production of this shop was dominated by long‑petal bowls, especially those with jeweling, along with occasional examples of imbricate or concentric-semicircle bowls. The contexts of signed and firmly attributed bowls in Athens show that the shop was active in the late IInd and early Ist centuries,85 but it may also be possible to trace its activity earlier in the IInd c. The bowl from Thompson’s Group D mentioned above can be tentatively associated with the workshop on the basis of the design of its double-rosette medallion and its dotted jeweling. Although the medallion is larger than that on securely attributed bowls, its closely similar design suggests a connection with the shop. If so, the larger size may identify this piece (as well as 95 and 96), as a representative of an earlier phase of the workshop, and the context of the bowl at Athens, a pithos filled around 130, is earlier than the contexts of the bowls with smaller medallions.86 The worn resting surface of that bowl attests that it had been in use for a few years, so the shop was already in operation some years before the deposit date. How long it continued in operation is impossible to say, but the fact that examples in Sullan debris are fragmentary suggest that it may have ceased production somewhat before 86.

Unattributed bowls

37More than half of the collection remains unattributed: over 60 pieces of earlier types, about 200 long‑petal bowls, and a scattering of other, rare types. The present catalogue includes about two thirds of the unattributed pine‑cone scale, imbricate, floral, and figured bowls, omitting only small scraps that repeat motifs on catalogued fragments. I have been more selective with the long‑petal fragments, many of which preserve only small sections of the wall; the percentage represented in the catalogue is less than one third. I include all of the examples of concentric-semicircle and network bowls that may be of Attic manufacture.

Earlier Types: Pine‑Cone, Imbricate, Floral, and Figured Bowls (figs. 27‑35)

38Bowls with surfaces covered in knobs, in imitation of a pine cone, are rare both in the overall corpus and on Delos. There are two small fragments in Laumonier’s sample, one of which (103) closely shares the form of decoration and the simply offset rim with an Athenian example. A second fragment (104) is also probably Attic, but too little is preserved for certainty.

  • 87 Agora XXII, p. 52, no 67, pl. 12; Metzger 1971, p. 70, no 129, pl. 17; I. R. Metzger, “Dioskurenbec (...)
  • 88 For the type, see U. Sinn, Die homerischen Becher: hellenistischen Reliefkeramik aus Makedonien (19 (...)

39Most of the imbricate fragments do not preserve the rim or medallion, so Athenian manufacture cannot be guaranteed by the usual scraped groove, but a combination of fabric and familiar compositions suggests they are Attic. Small imbricate leaves like those on 109115 are very common as calyx patterns on figured bowls, and fragments where only the lower wall is preserved may come from such bowls. Large lotus petals like those of 105‑107 are not common in Athens, but general parallels may be cited among Athenian collections. Two lower bodies (108, 122) decorated with lotus petals, or petals and leaves, could be either floral or figured; the lack of detail suggests they are relatively late products. The most intriguing item among the imbricate bowls is 117, which shares a large rosette medallion with overlapping petals with two other, highly unusual bowls: a floral bowl at the Agora decorated with thick volutes, and a bowl from the Piraeus with completely unprecedented figured decoration.87 It thus adds a third example to a workshop or class that is poorly represented in the known corpus. The floral bowl comes from a deposit that was discarded around 180. The complex stamps of the figured bowl, with many overlapping figures, reflect the so‑called Homeric bowls of Thessaly and Macedonia.88 The high relief of 117 is consistent with a date in the second quarter of the IInd c.

  • 89 For the earliest floral bowls, mechanical copies of metal bowls, see S. IRotroff, “Silver, Glass, (...)

40Three of the floral bowls (118120) present the most classic of the Athenian floral patterns, where tendrils alternate with tall, thin lotus petals. This scheme is among the earliest known on moldmade bowls and closely related to the metal prototypes.89 Fragment 121, which may have been similarly decorated, is remarkable for its medallion, probably a Medusa; it is not documented in Athens, but the scraped groove around the medallion suggests Attic manufacture.

41The figured bowls (123‑137) are dominated by idyllic scenes: goats and kraters (123125), kneeling silenoi supporting kraters (128, 129), a silenos standing under a tree (132). The few isolated mythological characters represented are the Danaid Amymone carrying her situla (130), Apollo resting after the defeat of Pytho (131), and Zeus’s abduction of Ganymede (134). The Ganymede scene–a striding male figure holding his victim diagonally across his body–is identified by the large eagle behind the figures. In a closely similar composition, the bird is absent and the victim may be female (133). There is a single hunting scene (135).

42Fragment 138 presents a particularly fine and unusual medallion. It was probably constructed from various leaf elements rather than impressed by a single punch, and it has no precise parallels. Two bowls at the Agora, however, have similarly complex medallions, one with a dotted background like that of 138, and both are surrounded by a very thin scraped groove. The care with which they were composed tempts one to place them near the beginning of the tradition. Among the rims there are some unusual stamps – an ivy leaf (141), a linear rosette (146), and dolphins swimming above a running spiral (142) – but otherwise the patterns are all familiar ones. The lotus bud of 144 finds analogies with rim patterns on early floral bowls, so it (or the mold in which it was made) may date in the late IIIrd or early IInd c.

Long‑petal Bowls (figs. 36‑47)

  • 90 S. IRotroff (n. 28), p. 87‑93; ead., “The Date of the Long‑petal Bowl: A Review of the Contextual (...)
  • 91 Agora XXII, p. 93, no 409, pls. 69, 91.

43Over half of the Attic bowls in Laumonier’s sample are of the long‑petal variety, their walls decorated with simple tall, rounded petals, sometimes divided by columns of jeweling. A few fragments of bowls of this type have been found in Athens in deposits laid down around the end of the first quarter of the IInd c., showing that local potters were experimenting with the long‑petal scheme that early, but the type did not become common there until after the middle of the century.90 Thereafter it dominated production, perhaps completely supplanting figured and floral decoration. It is likely that the Sullan sack of 86 B.C. put an end to production, though a single piece from the Agora, of Attic type but covered with the green lead glaze of the second half of the Ist c., shows that some molds survived.91

  • 92 This can also be observed in material from the Athenian Agora. For example, among fragments of long (...)

44Over half (about 140) of the Attic long‑petal bowls in the sample are single wall fragments, often without a trace of either medallion or rim pattern, and identified as Attic on the basis of fabric alone; most of these have been excluded from the catalogue. The better-preserved pieces, however, present a wide variety of design, fabric, and quality, despite the simplicity of the scheme. Some find close parallels with material excavated in Athens, but others do not, and the chief challenge lies in distinguishing between Attic products and those that may come from other sources. Changes in Athenian production techniques add to the difficulty. Attic gloss of the period is extremely variable and often of poor quality; the presence of the distinctive Athenian scraped groove below the rim or around the medallion often indicates that items one would not otherwise identify as Attic must be so. As time went on, however, Attic potters were less consistent in the addition of that telltale groove, so even fragments that lack it cannot be excluded out of hand as candidates for Attic manufacture.92 Decisions about what is Attic and what is not were made on a case by case basis, and often without complete assurance. For example, two fragments with the high-quality black gloss associated with Attic products show an unusual form of beading–large and well-spaced beads in the rim pattern (181) and around the medallion (194)–that finds no parallel in long‑petal bowls from Athenian deposits, and it must be kept in mind that other centers were capable of producing a fine black gloss. The same is true of a jeweled bowl with a rosette medallion different from anything known in the Attic corpus (165) and a plain bowl with a complex medallion pattern (203). The Rhodian rose that crowns the column of jeweling on 151 is also a detail undocumented in the Athenian corpus, although the fabric of the piece is visually indistinguishable from Attic.

45In the main, this collection closely parallels that at the Athenian Agora. As there, plain bowls are much more common than jeweled ones (they account for about 70% of the examples), and, with one exception (166), the petals are flat or concave. Rim patterns are usually restricted to one to three ridges, but some fragments preserve more elaborate designs (148, 167, 176183). The bead-and-reel rim pattern of 183 and the medallion motifs of 170, 171, and 198 are new additions to the known repertoire, as is the pattern of widely spaced, free-floating petals of 204. Rosettes appear with greater regularity on the medallions than they do in Athens (159165, 191197, 204), where various radiating star‑like patterns dominate. The collection also documents the variety of Athenian glazing: five bowls with a thin, light brown gloss of such consistency as to suggest they came from the same kiln batch (e.g., 199); one where the gloss has almost completely disappeared (170); and several with bright red gloss (160, 169, 195). Several fragments illustrate the low standard of some Athenian production in the later Hellenistic period, with irregular and crudely drawn petals or irregular lines of jeweling (e.g., 158, 164, 188, 190) and lack of care in the execution of the scraped groove around the medallion (e.g., 164, 192, 202). There is evidence of poor planning of the design on 154 and 155, where not enough space was left for jeweling between some of the petals and, on 154, two different stamps were used atop the columns of jeweling. One fragment (189) is signed, but the name is incomplete and illegible.

46A group of four pieces provides evidence for an unusual shape, with a straight, vertical rim instead of the usual concave rim and outturned lip (e.g., 167169). Here again the scraped groove argues for Attic manufacture, and excavations in Athens have produced a few local vessels of comparable shape, though no close parallels for these particular bowls.

  • 93 Courby 1922, p. 327, pl. IX:d; P. Hatzidakis, “Κτίριο νότια του ‘Ιερού του Προµαχώνος’: Μία taberna (...)
  • 94 S. I. Rotroff, “Date of the Long‑petal Bowl” (n. 90), p. 640‑641.

47Both of the molds for moldmade bowls found on Delos are of the long‑petal type and possibly of Athenian manufacture. The one in Laumonier’s sample (147) is a tiny fragment, but the curved top of a long petal is preserved, and the space beside it indicates it was for a jeweled bowl. The jeweling of the rim pattern is paralleled on pieces on Delos (148, 182), as well as in Athens. Its fabric is similar to that of Attic molds. The other mold fragment, well published and illustrated,93 is also for a jeweled long‑petal bowl that would not look out of place in Athens; it has an ovolo rim pattern, indicating a date early in the production of the type.94 The existence of these two molds, whether they originated in Athens or not, alerts us to the possibility that moldmade bowls of Attic type were manufactured on the island.

  • 95 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 83, nos 321, 328, pls. 58, 59.
  • 96 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 85, no 347, pl. 63.
  • 97 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 86, no 349, pl. 63; Edwards 1956, p.105, no 104, pls. 49, 51.

48Scrutiny of the fragments in Laumonier’s sample provides evidence for a previously unremarked variability in the ways the long‑petal design was applied to the mold. The decoration of most Athenian long‑petal bowls seems to have been largely executed by hand in the mold. Sometimes the artisan drew a series of long lines beginning at or just above the groove around the medallion, looping them over to one side at the top to end at the edge of the previously drawn petal (e.g., 176, 177, 180, 183).95 In a slightly different procedure, he drew a series of closely spaced lines, again radiating from the medallion ridge (their terminations at the top are sometimes visible as “ears,” vertical strokes continuing above the top of the petal, e.g., on 178 and 184), then added the curved top either by hand96 or with a crescent-shaped tool (178, 179, 184, 185, 187).97 Some such procedure is necessary for the contiguous petals of the plain bowls, which could not be produced by punches, but Athenian artisans may have applied it to jeweled bowls as well; at least, on some examples, the petals terminate evenly at the medallion ridge, as one would expect if they were drawn freehand (e.g., 61, 160). The Delos collection shows, however, that the potters also used punches for the petals of jeweled bowls, sometimes with the petals floating free of the medallion ground line. This is clearest on 204, identified as Attic by its scraped grooves, but seems also to be true of 161 (with a scraped groove) and (the not certainly Attic) 163 and 165.

  • 98 Agora XXII, p. 69, no 207, pls. 40, 81.

49Two pieces provide evidence of continuity from earlier traditions. The rosette on the medallion of 195 may derive from a design found on a figured bowl of the second quarter of the IInd c.,98 that of 196 resembles the double-rosette medallion of the M Monogram Class, though it is larger, and those of 159 and 191 may represent retooling of the eight‑petal rosette medallion of Workshop A.

  • 99 Courby 1922, p. 364‑366, pl. IX:e, f; c. Watzinger, “Vasenfunde aus Athen”, MDAI(A) 26 (1901), p. 6 (...)
  • 100 R. H. Howland, Greek Lamps and Their Survivals, The Athenian Agora IV (1958), p. 176‑177, lamps of (...)
  • 101 E. g., Agora XXII, p. 87, 92, 93, nos 359, 360, 362, 403, 410, pls. 64, 65, 69, 96, 97, all probabl (...)
  • 102 G. Siebert (n. 57), p. 295, no A.121, pl. 10 (Argos), p. 381, no Go.3, pl. 49 (Gortys).

50An unusual and attractive variant in which the petals swirl around the wall of the bowl is relatively well represented (170175). It is only the scraped groove around the medallion of 170 that confirms that it and the closely similar 171 are of Attic manufacture. The design of 173, with its stiff, diagonal petals, is without parallel, but again a scraped groove argues for Attic provenience. Three fragments, from one or two bowls, replace the usual jeweling with beading (174, 175). Another fragment (172) bears a signature, of which only two letters are preserved: alpha and rho. It could be any number of names, though it is tempting to restore it as Ἀρ[ίστωνος], and to associate it with the well‑known maker of pottery and lamps of the late IInd and early Ist c. The signature occurs at Delos and Athens on filter jugs decorated with a calyx of lotus leaves combined with imbrication and sometimes semicircles.99 One of the examples at Athens is made of gray ware and probably imported from Asia Minor, and none of the others need have anything to do with Athens. An Ariston did sign Attic lamps, however,100 and the swirling petal design seems to have been an Athenian specialty, so an Attic provenience is possible. This form of signing, with individual letters placed within decorative elements of the bowl, is found on network and lotus‑calyx bowls,101 and, more rarely, on long‑petal bowls,102 but I have not encountered it on any object of certain Attic manufacture.

Bowls with Geometric Decoration (figs. 48‑50)

  • 103 Agora XXII, p. 38‑39.

51Bowls with decorative schemes based on geometric patterns are found in small numbers, as is the case in collections elsewhere. Best represented are the concentric-semicircle bowls. The eponymous semicircles depend from the rim pattern, while the lower part of the bowl may be decorated with a large calyx of lotus petals, with imbricate leaves, petals, or knobs filling the area in between.103 The type may have been introduced shortly before the middle of the IInd c. and enjoyed limited popularity in late Hellenistic times. It is not common at Athens, but, while most of the examples at the Agora appear to be imports, at least some of those on Delos are probably Attic. The large fragment 205 has a scraped groove below its rim, the infilling motif of 206 is paralleled at Athens, and the fabric of 207 and 208, while not decisive, is consistent with Attic manufacture.

  • 104 E.g., Thompson 1934, p. 381‑383, no D 38, figs. 69a, 69b.
  • 105 Agora XXIX, p. 108‑109.
  • 106 Agora XXII, p. 39.

52The decoration of another small collection of pieces consists of networks of various forms. The fragment 209 probably comes from a network-pattern bowl sensu stricto, where the wall is divided by ridges into pentagonal and hexagonal segments.104 This type of decoration, incised into the walls of wheelmade bowls, is known at least as early as the third quarter of the IIIrd c.105 When it was first applied to moldmade bowls is unknown, but the calyx of small leaves at the base of the wall, frequently found on floral bowls such as 118 and 119, suggests that 209 is an early example of the net‑pattern type, probably dating before the middle of the IInd c. The scraped groove around its medallion attests that it is Attic. The wall of the better-preserved 210 is covered by a different sort of network, consisting of diamond-shaped panels, each containing a free-floating motif. Laumonier’s original numbering shows that he did not regard it as Attic, and with good reason; its red gloss is unusual. and the composition is not paralleled in Attica. The scraped groove below the lip, however, argues for its possible Athenian identity. Yet a third form of network appears on 211, where linked petals create a surface covered with large daisy‑like flowers.106 The type is rare and there is little evidence for its date, but as far as I am aware, it is not attested in contexts earlier than the late Hellenistic period.

Athens and Delos

Peculiarities of the Collection

53The bowls on Delos display most of the same characteristics that are exhibited by collections in Athens itself, but there are some differences. The most remarkable of these is the state of the gloss; while bowls at Athens have usually retained their gloss well, on Delos it is often poorly preserved, sometimes even completely missing. Although this is easily explained by the differing soil chemistry at the two sites, it draws attention to an interesting feature: gloss is consistently much better preserved on the inside than on the outside, and sometimes dramatically so. This anomaly occurs so frequently that it cannot be the result of the accidents of burial, e.g., with a less corrosive environment on one side of a fragment than on the other. It is also unlikely to be the effect of the wine that was served in the vessels. They were in contact with it for only limited periods; furthermore, consistent good preservation of the interior gloss continues all the way to the lip, which would have had less intense contact with the contents. The difference in preservation is most likely the result of the production process; the wheel‑turned surface of the interior fostered gloss retention in a way that the moldmade surface of the exterior did not.

  • 107 From the published photograph, it appears that string marks also occur on a bowl of Hausmann’s Work (...)
  • 108 At the Agora I have found traces on bowls of the Workshop of Bion (Agora XXII, p. 56, no 101, pl. 7 (...)

54Five bowls show a slight but puzzling spiral pattern on their undersides or lower bodies (fig. 51, left). It is clearest on 75, a bowl of Hausmann’s Workshop with a plain medallion slightly recessed from the plane of the surrounding ridge. It can also be observed on the lower calyx of another bowl of the group (74),107 and lighter but similar patterns of curved, parallel grooves appear on an imbricate bowl (108), on a figured bowl probably from the Workshop of Bion (31), and on two or three long‑petal bowls (192, Laumonier 7203 [omitted from the catalogue], and 199). What these marks most resemble is the pattern left by cutting a pot off the wheel with a string, but since these vessels were made in molds, that explanation seems impossible. The marks might be the result of a heavy‑handed wiping of the lower surface of the unglazed bowl while it spun, upside‑down, on the wheel. The potter had to position the bowl this way in order to cut the scraped groove around the medallion. That, however, was done after glazing, while the thick gloss on two of the bowls (75 and 108) indicates that the action that caused the spirals took place before glazing. Another possibility is that, instead of throwing these bowls from a lump of clay within the mold, as we assume was the usual process, the potter threw a “blank,” a bowl of the appropriate size, on the wheel, removed it with a string (thus leaving a string‑cut mark on its underside), and then inserted it into the mold, pressing it into the mold walls as the wheel turned. If the blank was not pressed firmly enough into the bottom of the mold, the string marks could have survived, to be detected today on the finished product. Whatever the procedure, a review of the material at the Athenian Agora reveals more examples (fig. 51, right).108 They are not limited to a single workshop or period of time, but clearly represent a procedure that was followed throughout the industry but has only occasionally left any traces.

  • 109 Four examples in the National Museum at Athens have clear dipping marks inside and outside: Athens (...)

55Another peculiar feature that crops up on some of the bowls on Delos is a wedge‑shaped area of darker gloss on the interior surface (102, 126, 154, 184, 187, 195, 206). At first sight this looks like evidence of double dipping, a process in which the potter glazed the bowl by dipping it once into the slip, then turning it 180 degrees and dipping it again, leaving a darker strip where a small segment of the vessel received a double coat of gloss. Except for a few apparent examples in Hausmann’s Workshop, it is a practice that is all but absent from Attic pottery.109 Double-dipping marks, however, usually appear on both the inside and the outside of a vessel, while the discoloration on the Delos bowls can usually be discerned only on the inner surface. It may therefore have a different origin, such as lopsided stacking in the kiln. This in itself is not unusual, but it is of some interest that it is found much more commonly on bowls on Delos than on those found in Athens itself, where it is extremely rare. On 20, a small crescent of the wall escaped glazing altogether, another production detail unparalleled on bowls found in Athens.

56Also unusual is the occasional omission of the scraped groove below the rim or around the medallion. Although the groove is sometimes absent on long‑petal bowls found at Athens, its omission is almost unknown among the hundreds of fragments of earlier bowls there. In Laumonier’s sample, however, at least five bowls with the characteristic stamps of the Workshop of Bion (16, 19, 35), Hausmann’s Workshop (73), and Workshop A (51) lack this feature. Among these, 73 illustrates a final unusual feature. As discussed above, its stamps (tripod, Apollo) clearly associate it with Hausmann’s Workshop, but its dull, grainy gloss deviates significantly from the Attic norm. Similar deviations can be seen within some of the material associated with the Workshop of Apollodoros, where bowls with motifs that are identical in detail and size are made of visually very different fabrics. Compare 93 and 94, the former in a hard clay and a dull brown gloss that is unexceptional for late Attic pottery, the latter made of a soft red clay with small white inclusions and covered by a red gloss. Similar discrepancies occur between 96 (of standard fabric), 95 (of a remarkably pale clay), and a third piece (Laumonier 766, not catalogued) made of a soft, red fabric similar to that of 94.

  • 110 Courby 1922, p. 392‑393.
  • 111 BCH 81 (1957), p. 710‑711.
  • 112 EAD XXXI, p. 1‑4, 314.
  • 113 P. Hatzidakis (n. 93), p. 302. For archaeological evidence for workshops on Delos, see M. Brunet, “ (...)
  • 114 R. Etienne, J.‑P. Braun, Ténos I, Le sanctuaire de Poseidon et d’Amphitrite (1986), p. 224, no An.  (...)
  • 115 Rotroff 2013, p. 8‑10.

57These small differences between the Agora and Delos corpora may be meaningless, but if not, two explanations might be offered: that bowls of lesser quality were routinely shipped to Delos, or that the anomalous bowls were made elsewhere in Attic molds. Whether or not moldmade bowls were produced on Delos itself has been a matter of debate. Courby, in light of the huge numbers of matt‑gloss (“Delian”) bowls on the island, reasonably concluded that they were manufactured there.110 Laumonier at first concurred,111 but once he had identified the “Delian” bowls as Ionian products, he abandoned that model, though retaining the possibility that bowls of his derivative Plagiaire workshop might have been made locally.112 While no one would deny that the majority of the bowls on the island are imports, Panaiotis Hatzidakis has recently revived the thesis of some degree of local production, taking support from the fact that other objects, including terracotta figurines, were produced on the island.113 The fragments of two long‑petal molds found in the excavations of the early 20th c. (see 147) support his position, and a modest local production using imported molds could explain some of the anomalies described above. An Attic mold probably from the Workshop of Bion made its way to Tinos, documenting the movement of Athenian molds along a sea route that leads to Delos.114 That workshop is known to have expanded its activities outside of Attica. It has close links to one of the workshops of Argos, and a potter from that shop almost certainly set up a workshop on Lemnos, most likely soon after Athens regained control of the island in the wake of the Third Macedonian War,115 at precisely the same time that the city was granted control of Delos.

58One thing we can say with some assurance is that the Athenian bowls did not (all) arrive on the island as the private possessions of Athenian individuals who moved there for political, economic, or personal reasons. Rather they were part of commercial enterprises that brought a variety of Athenian products to Delos, including lamps and other types of pottery. Two groups of long‑petal bowls show such close firing similarities as to suggest that each comes from a single kiln batch: four bowls perhaps from the Workshop of Apollodoros, all with a red stacking circle inside (see 97, 98); and five bowls with a thin, pale brown slip (see 199). There is also a considerable incidence of closely similar pairs of bowls (compare 149 and 150; 25, 34, 66, and 67 similarly have near twins in the collection). This suggests that Athenian shops were shipping kiln batches of bowls to the island.

Athenian Production and the Delian Market

59Even though most of the fragments in Laumonier’s sample lack contextual information, stylistic analysis makes it possible to sort them into the three chronological phases described at the beginning of this article, and so to construct a chronological outline of the material as a whole. The closer ties between Athens and Delos that began in 167 would lead one to expect an increase in the export of Attic pottery to the island after that date. Although that expectation is met in Laumonier’s sample, the increase is not as dramatic as one might have anticipated. About 60% of the fragments belong to long‑petal and concentric-semicircle bowls manufactured after 167, but early types are surprisingly common. Fragments of at least 117 bowls and an additional 36 fragments of medallions, calyxes, and rims that must also belong to bowls of those earlier types give a total of over 150 items (nearly 40%) that date before 150 (Table 1). The sample may inflate the representation of early types–excavators were probably more likely to retain unusual figured wall fragments than drab long‑petal sherds–but there is no doubt that bowls were being imported to Delos from Athens before the middle of the IInd c.

60Bowls from Athenian contexts discarded in the second quarter of the IInd c. and later provide guidance in recognizing the later phase of imbricate, floral, and figured bowls: thick‑walled vessels with distinctly smaller motifs in higher relief (phase 2). A few bowls with these characteristics in the Delos collection can be associated with workshop groups (Class 1 and the M Monogram Class, 8086), others can be placed in this span on the more general basis of the features mentioned above (e.g., 111, 117, 123125, 127129, 131, 143). In total, 22 fragments of imbricate, floral, and figured bowls can be placed in this phase and most likely came to the island after the beginning of Athenian domination.

  • 116 S. I. Rotroff (n. 64), p. 363‑367.
  • 117 Agora XXII, p. 49, 78, nos 40, 275, pls. 7, 54 from deposit M 21:1 (p. 103).
  • 118 Especially the building fill of the Middle Stoa (H‑K 12‑14), the fill over the Square Peristyle (Q  (...)

61Most of the remaining fragments can be dated only within the wide and approximate range of ca. 225‑175, though it is important to stress that production was at a low level before ca. 200,116 and that 175 is simply a convenient round lower date. Because they were made in molds, bowls of the same form could be reproduced for many years. Repeated use must have produced wear on the molds, but there is no way to estimate how long it would have taken before the effects were appreciable. Perfectly fresh molds have been found in Athens in debris associated with the Workshop of Bion and discarded no earlier than ca. 170,117 so a bowl with crisp designs need not date any earlier than that. Bowls on which the details of the stamps are not sharp were produced later than those where the details are crisp, but this cannot be translated into anything but relative dates. The Delos bowls do show varying degrees of freshness, from the crisp images on 42, 56, and 57 to the soft outlines of 39, 51, and 55, but all, on the standard chronology, would fall between 225 and 175. There are now, however, indications that the terminal date of 175 may be a little early. Recent revision of the Rhodian amphora chronology has had an impact on the dating of Athenian deposits that are significant for the chronology of moldmade bowls, moving their terminal dates downward.118 Consequently, a slightly later date might be in order for the transition from the standard products of Workshop A and the Workshop of Bion to the less careful products that succeeded them.

  • 119 As Gros (2013, p. 149) has also pointed out. It would be interesting to widen the inquiry to other (...)

62With that possible shift, we find ourselves close to the time when Athens gained control of Delos, and it is worth considering how, if at all, Athenian production might have been affected by the availability of a new market on Delos. It is true that Attic bowls constitute only a small proportion of the moldmade bowls found there (see Table 2). As the separate tally of fragments from a single area (Oikos 5) of the Aphrodision shows, numbers vary considerably from place to place, even within a single complex, but it appears that, overall, Athenian bowls do not account for more than 10% of the moldmade bowls found on the island. At the same time, however, they far outnumber bowls from regions other than Ionia. Athenian imports are a distant second to Ionian, but a second nonetheless.119 It is worth pointing out, as well, that Delos preserves the largest collection of Athenian bowls outside of Athens itself. From the perspective of the Athenian potter, whose operations were very small compared to the Ionian industry, Delos must have represented a significant market.

Table 2 — Moldmade bowls on Delos.

Source

Ionian bowls

Attic bowls

Other

Total

% Attic

Laumonier’s sample1

ca. 6500

405

unknown

6900+

< 6 %

– Skardhana2

1337

146

140

1623

 9 %

– Serapeion C3

38

5

1

44

11 %

– Archegesion4

60

5

5

70

 7 %

Maison des sceaux5

45

2

47

 4 %

Aphrodision6

800

50

850

 6 %

– Aphrodision, Oikos 57

66

26

10

102

25 %

1 Number of Ionian bowls estimated from concordance to EAD XXXI; number of Attic bowls is the number now present in Laumonier’s trays.
2 EAD XXXI, p. 10. Numbers are included in the figures in row 1.
3 EAD XXXI, p. 9, with note 1, where Laumonier cites five Attic pieces from this context, although only two fragments identifiable as coming from the Serapeion were found in Laumonier’s trays. Numbers are included in the figures in row 1.
4 EAD XXXI, p. 8, with the Attic bowls currently identified in Laumonier’s trays. Numbers are included in the figures in row 1.
5 A. Peignard, loc. cit. (supra, n. 5), p. 313.
6 Gros 2013, p. 148.
7 Gros 2013, p. 149. These numbers are included in the total count for the Aphrodision on the previous line. I quote the number of fragments, but Gros gives also the minimum number of items.

  • 120 S. I. Rotroff, “The Pottery from the Agora Bone Well”, in ΗΕπιστηµονική συνάντηση για την ελληνισ (...)

63As described above, after about 50 years of production of generally high quality, Athenian moldmade bowls of the second phase show a marked and unmistakable decline. The original stock of punches and molds must eventually have been exhausted through breakage, loss, and wear. The new molds made to replace them repeat the old iconography but are stylistically very different. The figures are smaller and less detailed, perhaps as a result of shrinkage in the mechanical copying of motifs, and details may be coarsened through retouching. Punches were often pressed deeply into the mold, creating motifs in higher relief, possibly in compensation for loss of detail or in an attempt to create a more long‑lasting mold. Figures are fewer and compositions less varied. The bowls are often thick‑walled and heavy. It may simply be the case that the latter‑day potters had little interest in the project; they were not familiar with the fine silverware that had prompted their ancestors to invent the moldmade bowl and expended little creative thought on making these new molds. It is also possible, however, that economic forces lay behind this loss of quality, and we may speculate about a sequence of events that could have brought it about.120

64The reduced quality observed in bowls of the second quarter of the IInd c. suggests that potters were spending less time on the production of each mold and each bowl that they turned out. One possible reason for this might be that they were striving to produce more bowls in response to greater demand. The new market opened up by Athenian control of Delos could have created such a demand, as Athenian potters supplied bowls for the increased population on the island or shipped them there en route to markets further afield. As demand grew after the initiation of Athenian control in 167, potters would soon have exhausted their existing supplies of high‑quality bowls (of phase 1, currently dated to the range 225‑175). As the stocks of such bowls diminished and as old molds broke or became worn in the course of accelerated production, new molds would have been made in a streamlined process, resulting in the bowls of lesser quality conventionally dated 175‑150 (phase 2). It is further possible that buyers were not enthusiastic about these lackluster products, which did not compare well with the Ionian bowls being imported to the island in large numbers (though Ionian bowls are virtually absent from Athens). If the Athenian potter was to continue to profit from the manufacture of moldmade bowls, he was going to have to produce something with greater appeal to the consumer. Possibly it was flagging sales in the face of this competition that encouraged Athenian potters to concentrate their efforts on the long‑petal bowls that came to dominate production after the middle of the IInd c. The earliest of those bowls are fully the equal of the earliest floral and figured production: the molds are finely crafted, the bowls thin‑walled and coated with lustrous black glaze.

  • 121 For a summary of the shift in the amphora chronology in this period, see G. Finkielsztejn, Chronolo (...)

65The scenario sketched above is admittedly highly speculative; furthermore, it is impossible according to the chronology advanced in Agora XXII, which puts the beginning of production of bowls of lesser quality in ca. 175. But the recent revision of the Rhodian amphora chronology alluded to above has shifted dates in the first half of the IInd c. down by more than a decade.121 It is the amphora chronology that provides the backbone of the dating of the moldmade bowls. If the bowl chronology were to be shifted by the same amount, the floruit of the finer imbricate, floral, and figured bowls (phase 1) would be extended beyond the end of the first quarter of the IInd c. Coarser products like the M Monogram Class and Classes 1‑3 (phase 2) would be placed after 165, a date that would allow the impact of the Delian market as a factor contributing to their hasty production. This hypothesis, however, must remain untested until contexts very precisely dated in the necessary range come to light.

Conclusion

66Even though they are highly fragmentary and were excavated long ago, often in circumstances that leave them without contextual information, the Athenian moldmade bowls of Delos have the capacity to expand our knowledge in many ways. They enrich the corpus with a number of new stamps and shapes and augment our picture of workshops, particularly Hausmann’s Workshop and the Workshop of Apollodoros. They throw new light on the production process, and they may even be able to contribute to chronological refinement. They also raise questions, particularly about the trade in molds and the possibility that “Athenian” moldmade bowls might sometimes have been made in other places, even on Delos. These battered fragments have richly rewarded study, and it is satisfying, at last, to bring some closure to the work begun by Fernand Courby a century ago.

Catalogue

67The order of presentation of information in the catalogue entries is as follows.

Numbers.

Excavation numbers. Bowls found in 1959 and thereafter are designated by a two‑digit number for the year–usually preceded by the letter A (Archegesion), C (Îlot des comédiens), or D (Îlot des bijoux), or succeeded by the letter E (Îlot des bronzes) or S (Maison aux stucs)– and a find number, usually preceded by C. The proveniences of these items are recorded in the French excavation fieldbooks.
Laumonier numbers. Fragments from excavations prior to 1959 were labeled in black ink by Laumonier, the number usually isolated within an inked rectangle. As far as I am aware, any concordance between these numbers and additional information about the fragments has not survived. Although some of Laumonier’s papers exist in the archives of the École française d’Athènes, no material relevant to the Athenian bowls is included. Nonetheless, the numbers are useful as identifiers, since, except for a few inadvertent duplications, each is unique to a single fragment. The numbers of most of the fragments published here fall in the 7000s, the range Laumonier reserved for fragments he believed to be Attic. See EAD XXXI, p. 487 for his numbering system.
B numbers. Some fragments labeled in ink by Laumonier bear a second number, incised into the surface with a sharp point or, more rarely, inked. Sometimes these letters are preceded by the letter B; or, if not, they may be listed with the B prefix on the labels in or on the trays. I include the B in all instances in the catalogue, on the assumption that the incised numbers are all part of this sequence. According to Laumonier (EAD XXXI, p. 16), these refer to a numeration initiated in the 1920s by the ephor, Demosthenes Pippas, and then continued by Laumonier up until the latter 1950s. Sherds with the same provenience are grouped under a single number, and some of these localities can be identified through the records of the Delos Museum.
Courby numbers. Courby numbered hundreds of fragments in the course of his initial study of this material, using paper labels glued to the sherds. Only a few survive in a legible state, but traces of many attest that the fragments were found in the excavations of 1904‑1914 that produced the corpus that Courby studied. I include the surviving numbers, preceded by “Courby”.

In a few cases the numbers have been partially effaced or are lacking altogether.

Provenience, if known.
Reference to publication if the bowl/fragment has been previously published.
State of preservation.
Dimensions. All dimensions are in centimeters.
H. = height, in the rare cases where the full height of a bowl is preserved.
diam. / est. diam. = diameter or estimated diameter of the rim, where a sufficient arc is preserved.
max. dim. = maximum preserved dimension.
th. = thickness of the wall, given to provide a sense of the robustness or delicacy of the vessel when there is no profile drawing. Th. at edge or th. at top refers to the thickness of the wall at the uppermost or outermost part of the wall that is preserved.
Comments on shape, if any.
Description. Description of decoration, from bottom to top: medallion, calyx, wall, rim pattern. Motifs on the wall are described from left to right unless otherwise indicated. Description of the profile of the rim, if preserved.
Fabric (clay) and gloss.
The color and texture of the fabric is not described unless it deviates from the norm. Normal color has been established by the evaluation of a sample of 202 fragments confirmed as Attic by their iconography and production details. Most of the Munsell readings are concentrated in the upper right quadrant of pages 2.5YR, 5YR, and 7.5YR. More specifically:
139 (69%) in the block of the four chips 5YR 6/4, 6/6, 7/4, 7/6;
18 (9%) in the block of the two chips 2.5YR 6/4, 6;
20 (10%) 7.5YR 7/4.
The remaining 25 samples are spread among chips contiguous with these blocks: 2.5YR 6/8, 7/6; 5YR 5/4, 6/3 and 7.5YR 6/4, 7/3, 7/6. Specific designations are given only for bowls with these outlying readings. General verbal descriptions (not Munsell readings) are given for gloss.
Reference to similar bowls in the Delos collection.
Comparanda and discussion.
Date: sometimes a date is suggested.

Workshop of Bion

Imbricate
1 (Laumonier 7503) fig. 1
Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.1, th. 0.3. Wall: lotus petals springing from calyx alternate with pointed ribbed leaves on stems. Rim: guilloche between ridges, pairs of double spirals above with trace of crowning leaf. Slightly shiny black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 70, no 211, pl. 81 (lotus with jeweled calyx), probably from Workshop of Bion (for the attribution, see Rotroff 2013, p. 22). Petals of similar design, but smaller, occur on a mold probably from the Workshop of Bion (Agora XXII, p. 49, no 41, pl. 7; cf. also Smetana-Scherrer 1982, p. 80, no 607, pl. 46). Attribution tentative.
(C63 C860+C880, C746) fig. 1
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Three wall frr., two of them joining. Max. dim. (a) 5.5, (b) 3.9, th. 0.2. Wall: widely spaced small acanthus leaves with boukrania between tips; pointed lotus petal and frond below (fr. b). Rosettes in field. Rim: pairs of double spirals with small pendant palmettes, ridges above. Shiny to metallic black glaze. Cf. Schwabacher 1941, p. 217, pl. VII B 16 (acanthus); Agora XXII, p. 47, no 20, pls. 4, 98 (boukranion from same punch but fresher, with Athena Parthenos medallion of Workshop of Bion), p. 48, no 32, pls. 6, 94, 98 (acanthus).

Fig. 1 — Workshop of  Bion, imbricate bowls (1, 2) and figured bowl (3).

Fig. 1 — Workshop of  Bion, imbricate bowls (1, 2) and figured bowl (3).

Scale 2/3. 

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

Figured
3 (Laumonier 7520) fig. 1
Rim fr. Est. diam. 14.5, max. dim. 7.0, th. 0.27. Wall: large rampant goat facing L; small frontal Eros moving R. Rim: alternating bull’s head and slave mask above narrow ridge. Scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Slightly shiny dark brown gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 58, no 117, pls. 21, 98 and two unpublished frr. (P 9399, P 11435) (identical goat and bull’s head); p. 70, no 214, pl. 42 (identical Eros, Workshop of Bion). The bull’s head also appears on another unpublished fr. (P 36828). The goat appears at a slightly larger size on a bowl probably from the Workshop of Bion (ibid., p. 58, no 121, pls. 22, 76).
4 (Laumonier 7501, Delos Museum B 2030) fig. 2
Four joining and one nonjoining frr. of upper wall and rim. Est. diam. 13.0, max. dim. 8.8. Single tendril of calyx preserved at bottom. Wall: lower row, bird flying R, pair of Erotes flanking wreath, with wing of another Eros at L break; upper row, old man masks alternate with kore masks with tiny rosette above. Rim: volutes between beading, two ridges, pairs of double spirals crowned by leaf. Reddened scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Dull greenish black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 56, nos 102 (old‑man mask, rosette), 104 (bird flying R), 105 (old‑man mask), pls. 17, 18, 75, all from Workshop of Bion. Lower rim pattern is unparalleled.
5 (C63 C885) fig. 2
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 4.2, th. 0.28. Trace of calyx at bottom. Pairs of stippled diamonds set at angle; tiny rosette where their tips meet, kore masks between them. Above, Eros flying R alternates with old‑man mask. Thin ridge at top. Shiny black gloss, metallic inside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 56, no 101 (diamonds, old‑man masks), no 102 (rosette), pls. 17, 75, both from Workshop of Bion.
6 (Laumonier 7532, Delos Museum B 1409 6876) fig. 2
Wall fr. from calyx to rim pattern. Max. dim. 8.8, th. at top 0.25. Calyx: fronds of different sizes, and small lotus petal at R, with swan, old‑man mask, and bull’s head between them. Wall: foot of Eros running L, facing pair of Erotes, hands joined, with upper part of column and capital between them; Eros running L; nude seated Apollo facing R, probably playing kithara. Rim: guilloche between ridges, traces of double spirals above. Fabric 7.5YR 6/4; shiny to metallic black gloss outside, mottled brown inside. Cf. Schwabacher 1941, p. 205, pl. IV A 9 (pair of Erotes, Apollo); Agora XXII, p. 56, no 105, pls. 18, 75 (old‑man mask, Workshop of Bion), p. 62, 70, nos 149, 209, pls. 28, 41 (Eros flying L, but much coarser). Unpublished fr. from the Athenian Agora probably comes from the same mold (P 36828).

Fig. 2 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (4–6).

Fig. 2 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (4–6).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

(Laumonier 7531a+7539, 7531b+c) fig. 3
Two non‑joining sections: four joining frr. preserving part of medallion and lower wall (a), and two joining wall frr. (b). Max. dim. (a) 9.1, (b) 7.5. Medallion: rosette within narrow ridge, surrounded by row of rounded, ribbed leaves, poorly impressed at R, all within ridge, scraped groove, and beading. Calyx: tall lanceolate ferns with swans between their tips, alternately facing L and R. Wall: two dancing figures facing one another, flanking krater. Bird flying L in field. Slightly shiny black gloss, greenish inside. Medallion similar to that of 19; small fr. of closely similar bowl found in Îlot des comédiens (C63 C1159). Cf. Agora XXII, p. 60, no 139, pl. 77 (dancing figure facing L, ferns), p. 70, 74, nos 212, 243, pls. 48, 82, 85 (medallion), all from Workshop of Bion.
8 (Laumonier 7558) fig. 3
Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 5.7, th. at top 0.4. Calyx: two rows of small pointed ribbed leaves. Wall: antithetical kneeling silenoi flank krater. Only lower leg of satyr at R and lower part of krater preserved. Traces of motif at L edge. Shiny brown gloss. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 356, no C 22, fig. 40, from Workshop of Bion.
9 (C63 C861) fig. 3
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 5.8, th. at top 0.25. Calyx: two rows of overlapping pointed ribbed leaves. Wall: high‑stemmed ribbed kantharos with high‑swung handles, small eight‑petal rosettes below. Dull black gloss. Similar: Laumonier 7549. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 60, 65, nos 132, 178, pls. 25, 33, 77 (kantharos), both from Workshop of Bion, less fresh than Delos fr.
10 (Laumonier 7515 bis) fig. 3
Wall fr. Max. dim. 4.0, th. 0.22. Rampant goat facing R toward ribbed krater. To L, Eros flying R, with trace of another motif at L edge. Dull black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 56, no 104, pl. 18 (Eros, goat), from Workshop of Bion. Goat stamp retooled and smaller on Delos fr., hence probably derivative or later in history of shop.

Fig. 3 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (7–10).

Fig. 3 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (7–10).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

11 (68E 3615) fig. 4
Îlot des bronzes, 1968. Wall fr. Max. dim. 4.2, th. 0.35. Nike flies L with arms outstretched, perhaps holding wreath. Wing(?) below. Soft fabric; dull black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 60, no 139, pls. 26, 77, where more detail is preserved, from Workshop of Bion.
12 (Laumonier 7559, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 4
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Lower wall fr. with part of medallion. Max. dim. 5.7, th. at top 0.28. Medallion: probably rosette, within scraped groove and beading. Calyx: row of small pointed ribbed leaves. Wall: Eros rides dolphin to L. Dull black gloss, mottled to brown inside with stacking circle. Perhaps from Workshop of Bion. Beading around medallion found almost exclusively in Bion’s workshop, and Eros rides a dolphin L on several bowls from that shop (Edwards 1956, p. 93, nos 9, 10, pl. 36; Agora XXII, p. 65, nos 177, 178, pls. 32, 33), but the stamps, though similar to this one, differ in detail. The closest likeness is its mirror image, on Agora XXII, p. 61, no 147, pls. 27, 78 (also with beading around the medallion), possibly from Workshop of Bion, though formerly tentatively associated with Workshop A.
13 (Laumonier 7542, Delos Museum B 5699) fig. 4
South of Ag. Kyrikos, garden, 1915. Fr. from lower part of wall. Max. dim. 4.3, th. at top 0.22. Tritoness swims L, arms bent at the elbow, perhaps holding tress of hair in raised R hand; leafy skirt, scaly tail. Traces of other motifs at L. Shiny black gloss. Cf. Braun 1970, p. 147, no 132, pl. 61:3, 5; Agora XXII, p. 67, no 190, pls. 35, 80, from Workshop of Bion.
14 (Laumonier 7536, Delos Museum B 7485) fig. 4
West of Lake, 1910. Fr. of wall and calyx. Max. dim. 5.5, th. at top 0.32. Calyx: tall ferns with eight‑petal rosette between tips. Tail of triton or tritoness swimming R. Metallic dark gray gloss, much missing outside. Cf. Schwabacher 1941, p. 204, pl. IV B 26, possibly from the same mold; Agora XXII, p. 65, 67, nos 173, 190, pls. 32, 35, 80 (triton), p. 59, no 125, pl. 24 (fern, rosette), all from Workshop of Bion.
15 (Laumonier 7569, Delos Museum B 4701) fig. 4
Wall fr. Max. dim. 8.0. Calyx: four to five rows of small pointed ribbed leaves. Wall: rampant goats flank ribbed krater, trace of motif above; bird flying L; Apollo sits facing R playing kithara; triton swims L holding dotted object in R hand, perhaps rudder in lowered L hand. Rim: tiny six‑petal rosettes between beading and ridges, double spirals above. Fabric paler than standard (7.5YR 7/3); dull black gloss, much missing outside. Cf. Schwabacher 1941, p. 190, pl. IV A 9 (Apollo); Agora XXII, p. 55‑56, nos 99, 102‑105, pls. 17, 18, 75 (goats, calyx, tiny rosette), all from Workshop of Bion.

Fig. 4 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (11–15).

Fig. 4 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (11–15).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [15], S. Rotroff [13].

16 (Laumonier 7570, Delos Museum B 4441) fig. 5
Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 9.0. Medallion: perhaps gorgoneion, within two ridges. Calyx: six rows of small pointed ribbed leaves. Wall: Eros rides L on spotted, tailless animal; Odysseus stands frontally, hands behind back; booted warrior strides R; ribbed krater. Shiny black gloss, dark brown on medallion and inside, with stacking circle. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 55‑56, no 99, pls. 17, 75 (krater), p. 67, no 190, pls. 35, 80 (Odysseus, calyx), p. 74, no 243, pls. 48, 85 (warrior), all from Workshop of Bion. A similar Eros, reversed and reworked, occurs on a bowl of the later Class 1 (ibid., p. 68, no 200, pl. 38).
17 (unnumbered) fig. 5
Lower wall fr. with part of medallion. Max. dim. 5.6, th. 0.3‑0.4. Medallion: radiating pointed ribbed leaves within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and beading. Calyx: two rows of pointed ribbed leaves. Wall: lower part of ship of Odysseus, decorated with small triangles and beading. Shiny black gloss. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 94‑96, nos 14, 23, pls. 37, 39 (medallion and calyx). The subject can be identified from the pattern on the ship’s hull (Agora XXII, p. 67, no 190, pls. 35, 80, Workshop of Bion).

Fig. 5 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (16, 17).

Fig. 5 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (16, 17).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. S. Rotroff; dr. A. Hooton.

18 (Laumonier 7540, Delos Museum B 7473) fig. 6
Terrace of Heraion, 1953. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 6.7, th. at top 0.27. Medallion within ridge. Calyx: four to five rows of pointed lotus petals at R, tall, jeweled fern with volutes at L. Wall: rampant goats flank fern (only legs preserved), swan facing R below. At R, frontal booted nude Dionysos supported by Ariadne at L, satyr at R (only arm and leg preserved). Slightly shiny black gloss outside, dark brown inside. Same fern on 19. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 56, no 104, pl. 18 (goats), p. 70, nos 210, 212, pls. 41, 82 (Dionysos group), all from Workshop of Bion. Elaborate fern identical in all details occurs on unpublished fr. from the same workshop at the Athenian Agora (P 36828).
19 (Laumonier 7541, Delos Museum B 7484) fig. 6
Single fr. preserving half of medallion and one‑fourth of lower wall. Max. dim. 8.3. Medallion: rosette within thin ridge and radiating rounded ribbed leaves, then groove and ridge. Calyx: originally four elaborate ferns (parts of two preserved) with smaller floral motifs between them (imbricate lotus petals to L, small lotus petals, pointed ribbed leaves, and a large leaf to R). Small dolphins swim L in field. Traces of figured decoration above: illegible at L, rear leg and tail of animal(?) at center, leg of small figure running R at R. Thick, shiny black gloss, browner inside. Medallion similar to that of 7; fern as on 18, but retooled. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 55‑56, 65, nos 99, 177, pls. 32, 75 (medallion), from Workshop of Bion.
20 (Laumonier 7537, 7537 bis, Delos Museum B 5745) fig. 6
Two nonjoining wall frr. Max. dim. (a) 6.7, (b) 6.7, th. (a) 0.5, (b) 0.32. Calyx: single row of large, ribbed leaves. Wall: divided by large, elaborate fern into segments, each occupied by single figure: frontal Nike with wings spread, arms held slightly out from sides; frontal silenos with head turned to L, L hand holding a bunch of drapery at his hip and R hand resting on tree. Rim: convex band. Dull black gloss outside, much missing, with accidentally unglazed area on fr. b, brown inside. For the elaborate fern, see 18 and 19. For the silenos, with clearer detail, cf. Agora XXII, p. 71, no 222, pl. 43, mechanically copied from a finer, larger version of the motif that appears on ibid., p. 69, nos 203, 204, pls. 39, 40, an early bowl from Workshop A. For the Nike, cf. ibid., p. 61, 70, nos 147, 209, pl. 27, 41, 78, both from fresher molds or punches. The latter two pieces were tentatively attributed to Workshop A in Agora XXII, but on the basis of links provided by the material on Delos, they are probably from the Workshop of Bion. May date after ca. 175.

Fig. 6 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (18–20).

Fig. 6 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (18–20).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

21 (Laumonier 7502) fig. 7
Fr. of rim and upper wall. Max. dim. 7.0, th. 0.2. Wall: Eros flying L alternating with bird flying L. Lagobolon and hand holding it visible below. Rim: ovolo with ridge below, beading above; pairs of double spirals; alternating leaf and rosette. Low rim with reddened scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Shiny black gloss, metallic patches inside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 64, 67, nos 170, 191, pls. 31, 35 (Eros, bird, rim pattern), p. 76, no 260, pls. 52, 86 (figure with lagobolon), all from Workshop of Bion.
22 (Laumonier 7552, Delos Museum B 4290) fig. 7
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 4.0, th. 0.32. Nude figure strides L holding spear horizontal in raised R hand and stretches L arm in front of him. Another motif to R. Ridge at bottom of rim pattern preserved. Fabric 7.5YR 6/4; shiny black gloss. Cf. Schwabacher 1941, p. 211, no 5:b, pl. VI A 2. The figure also occurs on unpublished frr. from the Workshop of Bion at the Athenian Agora (P 20264, P 20265).
23 (C62 C35) fig. 7
Îlot des comédiens, 1962. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 3.4, th. 0.18. Calyx: diamond-shaped frond tip with trace of stamp (wing?) at L. Wall: legs of nude figure moving R, probably a dancing satyr. Thin, dull brown gloss outside, greenish ochre inside. Another fr. with a diamond-tipped frond: Laumonier 7535. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 62, 64, nos 152, 154, 171, pls. 28, 31, 78, 79 (frond), from Workshop of Bion.
24 (Laumonier 797, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 7
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Wall fr. Max. dim. 2.4, th. 0.28. Eight‑petal rosette on dotted background, within circle. Fabric paler than standard (7.5YR 7/3); dull black gloss. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 98, no 50, pl. 41 (as medallion, same size); Agora XXII, p. 55‑56, 65, nos 99, 177, pls. 32, 75 (as medallion, slightly smaller); Agora XXVII, p. 202, no 263, pl. 53 (as wall motif, slightly smaller), all from Workshop of Bion.

Fig. 7 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (21–27).

Fig. 7 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (21–27).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

Medallions
25 (Laumonier 7320) fig. 7
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 6.1. Medallion: Athena Parthenos on raised disk surrounded by row of small ribbed pointed leaves, within two ridges. Calyx: overlapping small pointed ribbed leaves. Fabric 7.5YR 7/6; dull black gloss, mostly missing outside. Closely similar: C63 C739 from Îlot des comédiens. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 80, no 296, pl. 56 (mold), Workshop of Bion.
26 (Laumonier 7309+7321, Delos Museum B 7489) fig. 7
Dioskourion at Phournoi, 1933. Two joining frr. of bottom. Max. dim. 7.5, th. 0.5‑0.6. Medallion: Athena Parthenos within ridge, reddened scraped groove and ridge. Calyx: four rows of pointed ribbed leaves. Very worn punches or mold. Metallic black gloss, mostly missing outside. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 103, no 88, p. 47; Agora XXII, p. 56, 74, nos 104, 240, pls. 18, 46, 98, all from Workshop of Bion.
27 (unnumbered) fig. 7
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 5.5, th. 0.5. Large head of Athena Parthenos sits directly on radiating pointed, ribbed leaves, all on raised disk, within ridge, reddened scraped groove(?), and ridge. Slightly shiny brown to black gloss, stacking circle inside. Related though perhaps not from the workshop itself. The Athena stamp is larger than most instances in the Workshop of Bion, and it is unusual in not being placed within a fine circle.
28 (Laumonier 7329, Delos Museum B 7538) fig. 8
Oikos of the Aphrodision, 1958. Fr. of medallion and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.5. Medallion: gorgoneion surrounded by overlapping, slightly rounded ribbed leaves, within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: five rows of small pointed ribbed leaves. Wall: bird flying L, object with tripod foot (possibly a thymiaterion), and illegible motifs. Metallic black gloss, stacking circle inside. Another fr. with a partially preserved gorgoneion medallion of the same type and a calyx of small pointed leaves: Laumonier 7334. A gorgoneion of this size and design is very common in the Workshop of Bion (e.g., Agora XXII, p. 64, no 171, pls. 79, 98), though the radiating leaves are unusual. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 102, no 84, pl. 47 (gorgoneion surrounded by other radiating elements); Agora XXII, p. 74, no 242, pl. 47. Cf. also rim of ibid., p. 74, no 242, pls. 47, 98 (bird flying left), p. 70, no 215, pl. 42 (thymiaterion).
29 (Laumonier 7365) fig. 8
Fr. of medallion and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.6, th. at edge 0.26. Medallion: indistinct image of gorgoneion within wide ridge and cabled ridge. Calyx: tall fronds with rosettes between tips (part of one rosette preserved). Slightly shiny red gloss on wall, brown on medallion and inside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 64, 69, 80, nos 171, 205, 295, pls. 31, 40, 56, 79 (medallion and fronds), all from Workshop of Bion.
30 (C63 C890) fig. 8
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Fr. of medallion and lower wall. Max. dim. 4.9, th. at edge 0.27. Medallion: gorgoneion within beading, thin ridge, wide reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: fronds alternate with eight‑petal rosette. Slightly shiny brown gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 67, no 191, pl. 35, from Workshop of Bion.
31 (Laumonier 7571) fig. 8
Single fr., medallion, calyx and part of lower wall. Max. dim. 8.6. Medallion: gorgoneion with protruding tongue within light ridge and delicate beading, surrounded by ridge, reddened scraped groove, ridge. Calyx: four rows of imbricate small ribbed leaves in high relief. Wall: legs of nude figure striding L, hem of cloak visible between legs, probably repeated four times (probably Zeus abducting Ganymede). Slight traces of string marks on outer ridge around medallion. Dull black gloss, much missing outside, metallic black inside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 47, 70, nos 24, 214, pls. 4, 42 from Workshop of Bion (medallion, Delos image slightly smaller); Agora XXVII, p. 190, no 174, pl. 45 (striding figure, Workshop A?). Attribution to Workshop of Bion tentative.

Fig. 8 — Workshop of  Bion, bowls with gorgoneion medallion (28–31).

Fig. 8 — Workshop of  Bion, bowls with gorgoneion medallion (28–31).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton.

32 (Laumonier 7335) fig. 9
Fr. of medallion and lower wall. Max. dim. 5.8. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette with hatched petals, within ridge, scraped groove, and beading. Calyx: three rows of pointed motifs with hatched ornament. Dull black gloss. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 99, no 59, pl. 43 and Agora XXII, p. 47, 49, 65, nos 22, 40 (mold), 174, pls. 4, 7, 98, all from Workshop of Bion.
33 (C63 C750) fig. 9
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 4.1, th. at edge 0.42. Medallion: nine‑petal rosette with small circle center, on raised disk, within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and cabled(?) ridge. Metallic black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 59, no 125, pl. 24, crisper.
34 (Laumonier 7534, Delos Museum B 7484) fig. 9
Fr. of medallion and lower wall. Max. dim. 5.1, th. 0.38. Medallion: double rosette, probably 12 petals outside and 11 inside, within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and beading. Calyx: tall ferns. Metallic black gloss. Closely similar: Laumonier 7533. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 99, no 56, pl. 42 from Workshop of Bion, and an unpublished fr. from the Athenian Agora (P 27316).
Rims
35 (C62 C301) fig. 9
Îlot des comédiens, 1962. Rim fr. Max. dim. 6.1, th. 0.3. Wall: trace of motif. Rim: guilloche between ridges, pairs of double spirals crowned by palmette. Sharply outturned lip with no scraped groove. Dull black gloss, partly missing outside, brown inside. Similar but with scraped groove: C63 C923 from Îlot des comédiens. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 54, 55, nos 82 (mold), 96, pls. 14, 16, probably both from Workshop of Bion.
36 (C63 C745+C866) fig. 9
Îlot des comédiens. Two joining rim frr. Est. diam. 17.0, max. dim. 5.8, th. 0.27. Crosshatching, beading, thin ridge, pairs of double spirals crowned by small palmettes. Low rim, reddened scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Shiny to metallic black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 74, no 242, pl. 47, 98 from Workshop of Bion.
37 (C63 C872) fig. 9
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Rim fr. Est. diam. 13.0, max. dim. 5.1, th. 0.3. Beading, pairs of double spirals crowned alternately with leaf and rosette. Low rim with scraped groove below outturned lip. Dull black gloss, much missing outside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 67, no 191, pl. 35 from Workshop of Bion.
38 (C63 C748) fig. 9
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 4.4. Wall: outspread wing (Eros?) at L, illegible motif at R. Rim: beading, dotted triangles, ridge. Very metallic black gloss. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 102, no 81, pl. 46 (similarly dotted diamond). A dotted triangle appears as a rim pattern on an uninventoried fr. from the Workshop of Bion at the Athenian Agora (lot ΔΔ 25, deposit M 21:1, deposited ca. 170). For Eros, see 78 and references cited there.

Fig. 9 — Workshop of Bion, rosette medallions (32–34) and rim fragments (35–38).

Fig. 9 — Workshop of Bion, rosette medallions (32–34) and rim fragments (35–38).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [38], S. Rotroff [32].

Workshop A

Imbricate
39 (Laumonier 7302) fig. 10
Single fr. preserving section from lower wall to just below lip. Max. dim. 8.2, th. 0.25‑0.3. Wall: seven rows of overlapping fern. Rim: ovolo between low ridges. Dull black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 47, no 26, pls. 5, 73, 94, from Workshop A, with fern possibly from the same punch.
40 (Laumonier 7324, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 10
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Fr. preserving half of medallion, about one‑fourth of wall. Max. dim. 10.8. Medallion: rosette, probably with eight petals outside, four inside, within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: Two rows of tiny pointed leaves at bottom, seven rows of small fern, with larger stamps used progressively up the wall; small leaf between tips of top row (omitted from drawing). Dull dark brown gloss, mottled greenish inside. Small wall frr. of imbricate bowls with closely similar ferns: Laumonier 7327, Laumonier 7328. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 379, no D 35, figs. 66a, 66b (medallion), from Workshop A. Stylistically similar to Agora XXII, p. 47, 48, nos 26, 31, pls. 5, 6, 73.

Fig. 10 — Workshop A, imbricate bowls (39, 40).

Fig. 10 — Workshop A, imbricate bowls (39, 40).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

41 (Laumonier 7326, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 11
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Wall fr. Max. dim. 4.2, th. 0.3. Five rows of small palmettes. Shiny black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 48, no 30, pl. 5 (Workshop A), where the uppermost palmettes are similar but smaller. Attribution tentative.
42 (Laumonier 7325, Delos Museum B 7485) fig. 11
West of Lake, 1910. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 8.3, th. 0.25‑0.45. Eight rows of overlapping palmettes. Dull black gloss. Same palmettes as on 48 and probably 43.
43 (C62 C1415, C1587, C 1442) fig. 11
Îlot des comédiens, 1962. Three nonjoining wall frr., two from top of wall (a, b), one from lower wall (c). Max. dim. (a) 2.65, (b) 3.4, (c) 2.7, th. 0.25‑0.3. Wall: overlapping palmettes with smaller ones between tips of upper row. Smaller palmettes on lower wall fr. Rim: two thin ridges. Slightly shiny black gloss. Probably same palmettes as on 42.
44 (Laumonier 7304) fig. 11
Fr. of medallion and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.4, th. at edge 0.3. Medallion: ten‑petal rosette on concave surface creating bordering ridge, within groove and ridge. Outer ridge scraped or worn. Calyx: six to seven rows of small pointed ribbed leaves. Wall: trace of a figure. Thin, dull brown gloss, stacking circle inside. Similar rosette but with more detail preserved appears on bowls probably from Workshop A (Agora XXII, p. 66, 79, nos 187, 287, pls. 34, 55, 98). Attribution tentative.
45 (Laumonier 5104 bis) fig. 11
Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 4.4, th. 0.3‑0.4. Six rows of small, slightly pointed lotus petals with concave surfaces. Dull black gloss, mostly missing outside. Other small frr. with similar imbricate lotus: C63 C869, C63 C1539 from Îlot des comédiens. Probably from Workshop A, where imbricate lotus petals (though not certainly from the same punch) are a common calyx motif; cf. Edwards 1956, p. 99, no 54, pl. 42; Agora XXII, p. 75‑76, nos 248, 251, 252, pl. 50.

Fig. 11 — Workshop A, imbricate bowls (4145).

Fig. 11 — Workshop A, imbricate bowls (41–45).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.

Figured
46 (Laumonier 7515, unnumbered fr.) fig. 12
Three joining frr. of upper wall (a) and single wall fr. (b). Max. dim. (a) 5.7, (b) 4.3, th. 0.25. Wall: antithetical flying Erotes carrying old man masks. Part of another Eros and rampant goat facing L preserved on fr. b. Rim: scraped groove between thin ridges, egg and dart, low ridge, pairs of double spirals crowned by palmettes flanked by dolphins. Dull black gloss. Another unnumbered fr. preserving a single Eros and mask may also belong. Characteristic rim pattern of Workshop A (Agora XXII, pl. 98). For Eros and masks, cf. ibid., p. 57, nos 108, pl. 19; Agora XXVII, p. 190, no 169, pl. 44; for goat cf. Thompson 1934, p. 379, no D 35, figs. 66a, 66b; Agora XXII, p. 57, no 108, pl. 19, all from Workshop A. The same unusual positioning of the scraped groove below the rim pattern occurs on an unpublished fr. with similar decoration at the Athenian Agora (P 21045).
47 (Laumonier 7515 ter) fig. 12
Wall fr. Max. dim. 3.9, th. 0.2. Rampant goat facing L, head missing; lower part of krater at L, leg of Eros flying R above, and perhaps a wreath at R. Slightly metallic black gloss. See 46 for comparanda.
48 (68E 1968) fig. 12
Îlot des bronzes, 1968. Wall fr. Max. dim. 4.3, th. 0.25. Calyx: three rows of small palmettes. Wall: legs of goat facing L with foot of krater to L. At R, bird facing R with wreath. Shiny black gloss, greenish inside. Same palmette as on 42. See 46 for comparanda.
49 (Laumonier 7516) fig. 12
Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.2, th. 0.32. Wall: Rampant goat facing R toward krater. At L, Eros flying L with kore mask. Rim: two thin ridges preserved. Slightly shiny black gloss, mottled to green inside. See 46 for comparanda.
50 (Laumonier 7518, Delos Museum B 7485) fig. 12
West of Lake, 1910. Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.9, th. 0.25. Wall: rampant goat facing R toward krater; Eros flying L at L. Rim: fine ridge, egg and dart, beading, probably double spirals crowned by palmette. Slightly shiny black gloss with metallic patches. Possibly from Workshop A: goat and Eros stamps are typical of the workshop, but beading in the rim is otherwise unknown in the shop (Agora XXII, p. 28).
51 (Laumonier 7579) fig. 12
Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 7.4, th. 0.3‑0.5. Medallion: central motif surrounded by widely spaced radiating leaves, within two ridges. Calyx: three rows of palmettes. Wall: sitting birds facing R holding wreaths. Feet above, perhaps satyr striding L. Dull black gloss, red on medallion, red and brown inside. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 379, no D 35, figs. 66a, 66b (bird and wreath); satyr perhaps as Agora XXII, p. 59, no 123, pls. 23, 77, palmette as ibid., p. 57, no 108, pls. 19, 94, all from Workshop A.
52 (C63 C45A) fig. 12
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 2.6, th. 0.22. Calyx: row of lotus petals below row of veined leaves. Wall: wreath; traces of another motif at L edge. Shiny black gloss, mostly missing outside. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 99, no 54, pl. 42, from Workshop A, though too little is preserved for secure attribution.
53 (Laumonier 7514) fig. 12
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 3.6, th. 0.2. Wall: tops of wings of two confronted Erotes. Rim: pairs of double spirals crowned by palmettes flanked by dolphins, thin ridge above and below. Slightly metallic black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 70‑71, no 216, pls. 43, 82 (upper part of rim pattern). The figures are not attested at Athens but appear on an atticizing bowl in Frankfurt (inv. 557, CVA Frankfurt 4 [Germany 66], p. 106‑107, fig. 17, pl. 59 [3304]:5). Cf. also U. Heimberg, Die Keramik des Kabirions, Das Kabirenheiligtum bei Theben III (1982), p. 104, no 824, pl. 57.

Fig. 12 — Workshop A, figured bowls (4653).

Fig. 12 — Workshop A, figured bowls (46–53).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.

54 (Laumonier 6089) fig. 13
Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.5, th. 0.62. Thick‑walled vessel, perhaps a krater. Eros rides goat to R, his L arm extended, R arm reaching back and holding a torch (now missing). Highly metallic black gloss with much spalling. Cf. Braun 1970, p. 146, no 128, fig. 17, pls. 62:2, 82:1; Agora XXII, p. 63, no 158, pl. 29, from Workshop A.
55 (Laumonier 7556) fig. 13
Wall fr. Max. dim. 8.3, th. 0.32. Wall: nude male seen from behind, cloak over R shoulder; bull charging R, with hound running L below; nude male wearing cloak moving L, sword in R hand, poised to strike. Rim: two alternating ridges and reddened scraped grooves, egg and dart. Shiny black gloss. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 95, no 18, pl. 37 (bull); Agora XXII, p. 75, nos 247, 248, pls. 49, 50 (hunters, hound, slightly larger), all from Workshop A.
56 (Laumonier 7553) fig. 13
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 6.0, th. 0.32. Wall: warrior wearing cuirasse, chitoniskos, cloak, helmet, and boots strides R, spear cocked in R hand. L arm extended and wrapped in cloak. Traces of other motifs at L and R. Rim: ridge, egg and dart, jeweling. Shiny black gloss. Attribution is based on the characteristic rim pattern of Workshop A (Agora XXII, pl. 98). The same warrior occurs at slightly smaller size on bowls of Bion’s Workshop (ibid., p. 74, no 243, pls. 48, 84; Braun 1970, p. 146, no 129, fig. 20), probably copied from the motif in Workshop A.
57 (Laumonier 7360) fig. 13
Large fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 10.3, th. at edge 0.27. Medallion: double rosette, eight petals outside, four inside, surrounded by row of overlapping leaves within two ridges, perhaps a partially scraped and reddened groove between them. Calyx: overlapping large, rounded ribbed leaves, with widely spaced small pointed ribbed leaves at base. Wall: overturned kalathos and base of hand‑drawn plant, possibly drapery to L of kalathos. Slightly shiny black gloss with metallic patches. Same stamps as Agora XXII, p. 67, no 193, pls. 36, 80 (abduction of Persephone), arranged slightly differently; for overturned kalathos, see ibid., p. 23. For medallion, cf. Edwards 1956, p. 99, no 54, pl. 42; Agora XXII, p. 47, 54, 80‑81, nos 26, 87, 298 (mold), pls. 15, 56, 73, 98, all from Workshop A.

Fig. 13 — Workshop A, figured bowls (5458).

Fig. 13 — Workshop A, figured bowls (54–58).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.

Medallion, calyx
58 (Laumonier 7572, Delos Museum B 2745) fig. 13
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 9.7. Medallion: double rosette, eight petals outside, four inside, within ridge, reddened scraped groove, ridge. Calyx: nine rows of overlapping pointed, ribbed leaves bordered at top by ridge. Traces of stamps on wall. Metallic black gloss outside, duller with tan patches and stacking circle inside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 63, no 160, pl. 30, from Workshop A.
Rims
59 (Laumonier 7506) fig. 14
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 3.9, th. 0.3. Guilloche between ridges, jeweling, pairs of double spirals crowned by palmettes flanked by dolphins. Dull black gloss. Typical rim pattern of Workshop A; see Agora XXII, pl. 98.
60 (C63 C405) fig. 14
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Rim fr. Max. dim. 3.8, th. 0.32. Jeweling, pairs of double spirals crowned by palmette flanked by dolphins. Scraped groove below sharply outturned lip. Dull black gloss, spalling and peeling. Similar frr. from Îlot des comédiens and Îlot des bijoux: C62 C1583, D66 C4383. Typical rim pattern of Workshop A; see Agora XXII, pl. 98.

Fig. 14Workshop A, rims (59, 60) and long-petal bowl (61).

Fig. 14 — Workshop A, rims (59, 60) and long-petal bowl (61).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

Long‑petal
Long petal, jeweled
61 (Laumonier 7122 bis) fig. 14
Îlot des bijoux. Four joining frr. preserve whole profile, medallion and ca. one fourth of bowl; restored in plaster. H. 6.4, diam. 11.3. Light, delicate bowl. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Concave petals, jeweling topped by tiny leaves. Rim: three ridges. Scraped groove below outturned lip. Shiny brown gloss, black on rim, stacking circle inside. More jeweled long‑petal bowls with the same medallion: 6264, Laumonier 7177, Laumonier 7177 bis. Probable attribution based on medallion; cf. Agora XXII, p. 51, no 62, pl. 10 (floral bowl), p. 86, no 352, pl. 64 (long‑petal mold); Rotroff 1983, p. 274, pl. 62.
62 (Laumonier 7178) fig. 15
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 6.3, th. at edge 0.15. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette within narrow ridge, reddened scraped groove, and narrow ridge. Wall: concave petals, jeweling. Dull brown gloss, shiny with brown stacking circle inside. For comparanda see 61. Possibly made in a mold found at the Athenian Agora (Agora XXII, p. 86, no 352, pl. 64).
63 (Laumonier 7001, Delos Museum B 3466) fig. 15
North of Temple of Aphrodite, 1910. Small section of rim and about half of body; partly restored in plaster. H. 7.5, est. diam. 13.5. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: contiguous concave petals with ears at top. Rim: light ridge. Offset to wheelmade rim; scraped groove below sharply outturned lip. Dull black gloss above, brownish below. For comparanda, see 61. Attribution tentative.
64 (Laumonier 7063, Delos Museum B 7471) fig. 15
Upper valley of Inopos, 1935. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.2, th. at edge 0.43. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: contiguous petals. Dull greenish black gloss, much missing outside, small stacking circle inside. Similar: Laumonier 7062. For comparanda, see 61. Attribution tentative.
65 (C63 C607) fig. 15
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 5.3, th. at edge 0.22. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: contiguous petals. Dull dark brown gloss outside, black with stacking circle inside. Similar: Laumonier 7065. Medallion as 64 but with less detail. Attribution tentative.

Fig. 15 — Workshop A, long-petal bowls (6265).

Fig. 15 — Workshop A, long-petal bowls (62–65).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

66 (C63 C1570) fig. 16
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 10.2. Medallion: double rosette with eight petals outside, four(?) inside, with buds or small leaves between outer petals, within low ridge and irregular scraped groove. Wall: contiguous petals. Fabric 7.5YR 6/4; slightly shiny black gloss. Closely similar: D66 C3418 from Îlot des bijoux. Medallion characteristic of Workshop A; cf. Thompson 1934, p. 364, no C 41, fig. 48; Agora XXII, p. 57, no 108, pl. 19.
67 (59 S 105) fig. 16
Maison aux stucs, 1959. Two joining frr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 6.6, th. at top 0.35. Medallion: double four‑petal rosette, poorly impressed, within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: flat petals. Dull dark brown gloss, stacking circle inside. Closely similar: Laumonier 7038. Medallion similar to one that occurs in Workshop A (cf. Agora XXII, p. 76, 81, nos 253, 299 [mold], pls. 51, 56, 98), but poorly impressed stamp precludes certain attribution.

Fig. 16 — Workshop A, long-petal bowls (66, 67).

Fig. 16 — Workshop A, long-petal bowls (66, 67).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff; dr. A. Hooton.

Hausmann’s Workshop

68 (Laumonier 7550, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 17
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Wall fr. Max. dim. 7.8, th. at top 0.36. Wall: fallen amazon facing L, bow in L hand, attacked by bearded warrior armed with sword, cuirasse, and shield and wearing long cloak; nude warrior wearing pointed helmet, cloak clasped below his chin, strides L, extending L arm to R; trousered leg and foot of his opponent visible at R edge. Bird flying L above. Rim: dotted guilloche, pairs of double spirals with trace of crowning palmette. Thick, shiny dark red to brown gloss. For Greek and amazon on L, cf. Courby 1922, p. 347, fig. 71:28h; Agora XXII, p. 73, no 234, pls. 45, 84; Rogl 2004‑2005, fig. 4b. For rim, cf. Hausmann 1959, pls. 4‑6.
69 (Laumonier 7554) fig. 17
Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 9.4. Trace of medallion, within groove. Calyx: four rows of small acanthus leaves with narrow ridge above. Wall: leg and hanging cloak of booted amazon moving R; fallen cuirassed amazon with crescent shield in raised L hand looks up and back at cuirassed warrior who attacks her with sword, holding sheath in L hand; nude, helmeted warrior with shield strides R, sword held horizontally, cloak over L shoulder and hooked in R elbow; at far R, heel of figure facing R (omitted from drawing). Slightly light fabric (5YR 6/3); slightly shiny black gloss, partly missing outside, dull tan to brown inside with stacking circle. Cf. Courby 1922, p. 347, fig. 71:28a (amazon at L), 28g (central amazon and assailant), 28n (warrior at L); Agora XXII, p. 73, no 233, pls. 45, 84 (warrior at R); Rogl 2004‑2005, fig. 2c (central amazon and assailant). For ridge at top of palmette calyx, cf. Agora XXII, p. 63, no 160, pl. 30.

Fig. 17 — Hausmann’s Workshop (68, 69).

Fig. 17 — Hausmann’s Workshop (68, 69).

Scale 2/3.

Dr. A. Hooton.

70 (Laumonier 7551, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 18
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Wall fr. Max. dim. 7.5, th. at top 0.32. Tip of leaf of calyx preserved; figures stand on thin horizontal ridge. Nude warrior with oval shield moves L, grasping spear of lost assailant in R hand to fend it off; helmeted nude warrior with shield strides R toward mounted amazon, sword held horizontally in R hand; amazon rides R, looking back, with arm over head to deliver sword blow. Rim: egg and dart below beading. Shiny black gloss with metallic patches inside. Cf. Courby 1922, p. 347, fig. 71:28b, 28n and Agora XXII, p. 73, no 233, pls. 45, 84 (amazon and warrior striding R); CVA Musée Scheurleer 1 (Netherlands 1), III N, p. 4, pl. 2 [40]:1 and Hausmann 1959, pl. 2:1 (mounted amazon).
71 (Laumonier 7525) fig. 18
Wall fr. Max. dim. 4.6; th. 0.23. Rampant goat faces R toward ribbed krater. At L, tail of tritoness moving L and wing of Eros who rides on her coils. Ridge and trace of rim pattern above. Pale clay (10YR 7/3), perhaps burnt or overfired; slightly shiny green to black gloss. Cf. Benndorf 18691883, pl. 61:2 (goat and tritoness); Courby 1922, p. 342, 345, figs. 69:9a (goat), 70:24a (tritoness); Hausmann 1959, pls. 4 (tritoness), 5:2 (goat and krater); Agora XXII, p. 65‑66, no 181, pl. 33 (tritoness).
72 (Laumonier 7548, Delos Museum B 7489) fig. 18
Dioskourion at Phournoi, 1933. Wall fr. Max. dim. 6.2, th. at top 0.4. Wall: bowl of tripod and upper part of two broad legs. Dotted fillet descends diagonally from leg to L. Three circles above represent handles; above these, three ears and an arc. Rim: egg and dart with beading above; pairs of double spirals with traces of crowning palmettes. Dull dark brown gloss. Cf. Benndorf 18691883, pl. 59:3 = Hausmann 1959, pl. 6:1; Courby 1922, p. 349, fig. 72:43.

Fig. 18 — Hausmann’s Workshop (7072).

Fig. 18 — Hausmann’s Workshop (70–72).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.

73 (Laumonier 7547, Delos Museum B 468 K68 7734) fig. 19
Two joining frr. partly restored, preserving medallion and two‑thirds of lower wall. P.H. 4.0, est. minimum diam. 11.0. Medallion: bearded face within two ridges. Calyx: two rows of pointed leaves. Wall: seated Artemis and Apollo flank tripod. Artemis, wearing boots, short garment with high‑belted overfold, sits to R on lion‑footed bench, her R leg extended, L leg bent; holds bow with L hand and rests R hand on bench. Quiver visible over R shoulder. Nude Apollo sits L on lion‑footed bench, L leg extended, R leg bent. Between them, elaborate tripod with hanging fillets, round handles, and ears. Between each large stamp a flying bird with wreath, probably alternately flying L and R. Each antithetical group appears twice, and additional tripods space them. Fabric of standard color, but quality of gloss unusual: dull, slightly grainy black to brown, greenish inside. Figures illustrated by Courby (1922, p. 345, 349, 353, fig. 70:15b, fig. 72:32, 43, fig. 74:g). Cf. Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 60:3c (medallion); Hausmann, pl. 7:1 (Apollo, but figure on Delos bowl is slightly smaller); G. R. Edwards, (n. 51), p. 268, no 800, pl. 67 (Artemis, bird with wreath). For tripod, see references under 72.
74 (Laumonier 7577) fig. 19, 51
Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 8.4. Edge of medallion, perhaps a gorgoneion, within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: five rows of small acanthus leaves in high relief. Wall: at L edge, just above calyx, R forefoot of panther moving R; legs of goat moving L with maenad on his back (only her toe preserved); lower legs of frontal figure; Apollo seated L, with R leg bent and L leg extended, lion‑foot support of bench on which he sits visible at R break. Thick, shiny red gloss, browner and duller inside. Spiral string marks on edge of medallion, ridges, and lower part of calyx. From same mold as Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 61:1 = Hausmann 1959, pl. 7.1, with a more accurate drawing in Dumont and Chaplain [n. 38], pl. 40:3).

Fig. 19 — Hausmann’s Workshop (73, 74).

Fig. 19 — Hausmann’s Workshop (73, 74).

Scale 2/3.

Dr. A. Hooton.

75 (Laumonier 7566, Delos Museum B 4698) fig. 20, 51
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 6.7, th. at top 0.42. Medallion: plain with string marks, within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: three overlapping rows of small acanthus leaves in high relief. Metallic black gloss. Cf. Rogl 2004‑2005, fig. 2.
76 (Laumonier 7567) fig. 20
Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 6.4, th. at top 0.3. Medallion within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: five rows of small acanthus leaves, with traces of figured motifs above. Shiny brownish black gloss. The form of the acanthus is close to stamps within the workshop, but smaller.
77 (Laumonier 7562, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 20
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.7, th. at edge 0.42. Medallion: round‑faced gorgoneion with shaggy hair, within two ridges. Calyx: four rows of small acanthus leaves in high relief. Wall (lower parts of figures only): at L, rampant goats flanking krater; to R, archaistic Athena striding R. Clay of standard color (7.5YR 7/4) but with many small white inclusions; dull dark brown gloss. Stamps are retooled or poorly impressed, but comparanda suggest a connection to Hausmann’s Workshop; cf. S. Weston, (n. 31) (gorgoneion); Hausmann 1959, pl. 6:1 (Athena, leaves of calyx).
78 (Laumonier 7555, Delos Museum B 7489) fig. 20
Dioskourion at Phournoi, 1933. Single fr. preserves half of medallion, small segment of calyx and wall, trace of rim pattern. P.H. 4.2, est. minimum diam. 11.5, max. dim. 8.1. Medallion: ten‑ or twelve‑petal rosette within one narrow and one wide ridge. Calyx: ca. ten rows of small rounded leaves. Wall: animal running L (perhaps boar); hunter with cloak over shoulders, with back to viewer, his legs intertwined with hound running L; Eros striding R, spear held horizontally across body; boar running L. Rim: two rounded elements with bead below. Dull red gloss with brown patch outside. Cf. Courby 1922, p. 347, fig. 71:29d (Eros), 29e (boar), 29h (hunter seen from behind), all from Athens NM 2349 (Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 60:5 = Hausmann 1959, pl. 9:1). A number of bowls from the Athenian Agora have similar figures, but not from the same punch: e.g., Agora XXII, p. 76, no 256, pl. 52 (Eros smaller and reworked); p. 76, 78, nos 257, 271, pls. 52, 54 (same boar but larger); P 6316, unpublished (also glazed red, with position of Eros’s arm different).
79 (Laumonier 7504) fig. 20
Rim fr. Max. dim. 6.2, th. at top 0.35. Wall: woman approaches trophy, wreath with hanging fillets in raised R hand. Large wreaths to L and R. Rim: ridge; egg and dart; beading; alternating boukranion and phiale. Offset to wheelmade rim; scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Shiny black gloss with ochre patch outside. Cf. Courby 1922, p. 349, fig. 72:30; Agora XXII, p. 68, 70‑71, nos 200, 216, pls. 38, 43, 82 (woman with trophy), p. 47, no 20, pls. 4, 98 (boukranion). Same upper rim pattern appears above dotted guilloche on Karlsruhe Landesmuseum B 2686 (CVA Karlsruhe 1 [Germany 7], p. 39, pl. 31 [329]:10), illustrated in detail by Hausmann (1959, pl. 3) on a bowl he did not include in his list of bowls from the workshop.

Fig. 20 — Hausmann’s Workshop (7579).

Fig. 20 — Hausmann’s Workshop (75–79).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.

Class 1

80 (D66 C4167) fig. 21
Îlot des bijoux, 1966. Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.3, th. 0.3. Dancing or kneeling silenos faces L toward large kantharos, bird flying L above. Reddish fabric (2.5YR 7/6); shiny black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 59, no 127, pl. 24.

M Monogram Class

81 (Laumonier 7523, Delos Museum B 3766) fig. 21
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 4.5, th. 0.22. Wall: rampant goats flanking ribbed krater. Rim: egg and dart between ridges. Shiny black glaze. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 359, no C 26, fig. 44; Agora XXII, p. 57, no 110, pl. 19.
82 (Laumonier 7527) fig. 21
Wall fr. Max. dim. 6.2, th. at top 0.3. Calyx: overlapping small pointed ribbed leaves in high relief. Wall: rampant goat facing L, Eros with old man mask flying R. Rim: egg and dart between ridges. Shiny red gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 57, no 109, pl. 19.
83 (Laumonier 7333) fig. 21
Wall fr. Max. dim. 4.4, th. 0.4. Acanthus leaf at L. Frontal draped figure at R, possibly wearing mask. Fabric 7.5YR 6/4; slightly shiny black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 57, no 113, pl. 20 (acanthus).

Fig. 21 — Class 1 (80) and M Monogram Class (8183).

Fig. 21 — Class 1 (80) and M Monogram Class (81–83).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.

84 (Laumonier 767) fig. 22
Fr. of medallion and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.7. Medallion: double six‑petal rosette within two ridges. Calyx: acanthus leaves. Dull brown to black gloss, much missing outside, reddish inside. Same medallion as 85 and Laumonier 7307. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 57, 81, nos 112, 113, 301 (mold), pls. 20, 57, 94.
85 (Laumonier 7563, Delos Museum B 7473) fig. 22
Terrace of Heraion, 1953. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.0, th. at top 0.5. Medallion: double six‑petal rosette within scraped groove. Calyx: four rows of small pointed ribbed leaves. Black gloss, very metallic outside. See 84 for comparanda.
86 (Laumonier 7172) fig. 22
Fr. of lower wall and medallion. Max. dim. 7.4. Medallion: double six‑petal rosette within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: concave petals, jeweling. Shiny black to brown gloss, mostly missing outside. Closely similar: Laumonier 7169. For comparanda for medallion, see 84.

Fig. 22 — M Monogram Class (8486).

Fig. 22 — M Monogram Class (84–86).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton.

Workshop of Apollodoros

87 (Laumonier 7115, Delos Museum B 2730, Courby 569) fig. 23
Courby 1922, p. 331 (inscription only). Three joining frr. preserving one‑third of upper wall and small part of rim. P.H. 7.5, est. diam. 14.5. Wall: concave petals, dotted jeweling topped by lotus bud. Inscription [Ἀ]πολλοδώρου, retrograde, running from bottom to top of one petal. Rim: ridge. Outturned lip with no scraped groove. Slightly dark fabric (5YR 5/4); metallic black gloss. Small wall frr. with dotted jewels topped by bud, probably from same workshop: D66 C3477 from Îlot des bijoux, Laumonier 7120. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 85, no 341, pls. 61. 87.
88 (Laumonier 7119, Delos Museum B 7489) fig. 23
Dioskourion at Phournoi, 1933. Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 3.9, th. at top 0.18. Wall: concave petals, jeweling topped by lotus bud. Signature [Ἀπολλ]οδώρου in tiny letters runs retrograde from bottom to top in one petal. Rim: one ridge preserved. Slightly shiny greenish black gloss, dark brown inside. Other wall frr. with plain jeweling topped by bud, perhaps from this shop: C63 214 b (from a filter jug) and C63 C992, both from Îlot des comédiens, Laumonier 7209.
89 (Laumonier 7121) fig. 23
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 2.7, th. at top 0.23. Wall: concave petals, dotted jeweling topped by lotus bud with asymmetrical calyx. Shiny black to dark brown gloss, red inside. Same bud as 90 and perhaps 91. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 85, no 341, pls. 61, 87.
90 (Laumonier 7118) fig. 23
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 4.4, th. at top 0.29. Concave petals, dotted jeweling topped by lotus bud. Rim: single ridge. Dull brown gloss, black inside. Same bud as 89 and perhaps 91.
91 (Laumonier 7116) fig. 23
Wall fr. Max. dim. 6.1, th. at top 0.2. Concave petals, jeweling topped by lotus bud. Rim: single ridge preserved. Dull black gloss. Perhaps same bud as 89 and 90.
92 (Laumonier 7117, Delos Museum B 7489) fig. 23
Dioskourion at Phournoi, 1933. Rim fr. Est. diam. 14.0, max. dim. 6.7, th. at top of moldmade section 0.29. Concave petals, jeweling topped by bud. Rim: low ridge with scraped groove above. Straight rim, lip thickened, flat and unglazed on top with narrow groove, perhaps prepared for attachment of something that has now broken away. Dull light brown gloss. Probable attribution suggested by bud.

Fig. 23 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (8792).

Fig. 23 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (87–92).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [87], S. Rotroff [89].

93 (Laumonier 7184+7187, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 24
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Two joining frr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.0. Medallion: double six‑petal rosette within one narrow and one wider ridge. Wall: concave petals, jeweling. Thin, dull brown glaze outside, shiny black inside. For form of rosette, cf. Thompson 1934, p. 383, no D 41, fig. 72; Agora XXII, p. 48, 85, nos 35, 341, pls. 6, 61, 87.
94 (Laumonier 7185) fig. 24
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 4.9, th. at edge 0.23. Medallion: double six‑petal rosette within one to two ridges. Wall: long petals, jeweling. Fabric soft and very red (5YR 6/8) with many small white inclusions; shiny red gloss, mostly missing. For medallion, see comparanda to 93. An identical medallion in the same fabric comes from Sullan debris at Athens (P 37034, unpublished, from upper fill of cistern E 6:2; for context, see Rotroff 1983, p. 281‑282).
95 (Laumonier 7188, Delos Museum B 4390, Courby 778) fig. 24
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 7.1, th. at edge 0.4. Medallion: large double six‑petal rosette within two ridges, the inner one with a thin groove in its surface. Wall: concave petals applied by punch, alternating with jeweling. Fabric pale on outside surface (7.5YR 8/2), closer to normal Attic range inside (7.5YR 7/4); a few specks of black gloss preserved outside, dark brown with red stacking circle inside. Others with the same medallion: Laumonier 766 and probably 96. Medallion and surrounding ridges identical in size and details to Thompson 1934, p. 383, no D 41, fig. 72.

Fig. 24 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (9395).

Fig. 24 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (93–95).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

96 (Laumonier 7168) fig. 25
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 11.6, th. at top 0.38. Medallion: large double six‑petal rosette within two non-concentric ridges. Wall: convex petals applied by punch, dotted jeweling. Thin, dull brown gloss, black with stacking circle inside. Probably the same medallion as 95, but less fresh.
97 (Laumonier 7205) fig. 25
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 5.5, th. at edge 0.32. Medallion: double rosette with seven petals outside, six inside, perhaps stamped directly onto bowl, within two ridges. Wall: long petals, dotted jeweling. Shiny black gloss, red stacking circle inside. Closely similar: 98, Laumonier 7203, Laumonier 7206. Same medallion on 102. For the medallion, cf. Agora XXII, p. 85, no 346, pl. 62, also directly stamped with the same punch.
98 (Laumonier 7204) fig. 25
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 6.6, th. at edge 0.3. Medallion: rosette with seven petals outside, six inside, perhaps stamped directly onto bowl, within two ridges. Wall: long petals, dotted jeweling. Metallic brownish black gloss, darker with red stacking circle inside. See 97 for comparanda.
99 (Laumonier 7137) fig. 25
Upper wall fr. Est. diam. at top of wall 22.0, max. dim. 7.5, th. at top of moldmade wall 0.3. Large but thin‑walled bowl. Wall: concave petals, dotted jeweling. Jeweling columns topped by two jewels side by side, upon which a sphinx sits facing R. Rim: ridge. Shiny black gloss, partly missing outside. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 406, no E 78, fig. 95b, with two dotted jewels at the top of a column of jeweling on an Attic concentric-semicircle bowl.

Fig. 25 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (9699).

Fig. 25 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (96–99).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton.

100 (Laumonier 7146a‑d) fig. 26
Four wall frr. Max. dim. (a) 6.1, (b) 6.4, (c) 4.2, (d) 2.5, th. 0.2. Remarkably large bowl. Wide, concave petals, dotted jeweling. Shiny brown gloss, dull black inside. Two more wall frr. with dotted jeweling: Laumonier 7144 (from a large, closed vessel, unglazed inside), D66 C3184 from Îlot des bijoux.
101 (C63 C1723) fig. 26
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Wall fr. Max. dim. 3.9, th. 0.2. Parts of three petals, swirling to R, wide spaces with dotted jeweling between them. Dull reddish brown gloss. Another fr. from Îlot des comédiens: C63 C2267. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 383, no D 41, fig. 72.
102 (D64 C1431, C1430, C1441) fig. 26
Îlot des bijoux, 1964. Three nonjoining frr. of bottom (a) and wall (b, c). Max. dim. (a) 4.8, (b) 3.9, (c) 4.2, th. at top (c) 0.2. Medallion: parts of four petals of rosette possibly stamped directly onto bowl, within two ridges. Wall: pendent concentric semicircles at top of wall, with imbricate lotus petals in spaces between and below them. Rim: jeweling or beading between ridges. Slightly shiny brown gloss, darker, straight-edged area on inside of fr. b, stacking or dipping mark. Medallion as 97 and 98. An identical fr., supplied with a vertical handle, was found at the Athenian Agora (P 4200, unpublished).

Fig. 26 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (100, 101) and concentric-semicircle bowl (102).

Fig. 26 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (100, 101) and concentric-semicircle bowl (102).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton.

Unattributed bowls

Pine‑cone scales
103 (C63 C616) fig. 27
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Max. dim. 2.6, th. 0.31. Upper wall fr. Two rows of knobs, with lower edge of plain rim pattern above. Metallic black gloss. For rim cf. Agora XXII, p. 45, no 1, pl. 1.
104 (Laumonier 7348, Delos Museum B 2434) fig. 27
Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.5, th. 0.48. Large vessel, perhaps a krater. Parts of three to four rows of knobs. Fabric slightly different from standard (7.5YR 7/3 on surface, 7.5YR 7/6 in break); slightly shiny black gloss. Cf. Agora XXIX, p. 305, no 601, fig. 44, pl. 57.
Imbricate
105 (Laumonier 7341, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 27
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 5.3, th. at top 0.25. Wall: three rows of widely spaced lotus petals. Rim: low ridge with groove in surface. Slightly shiny black gloss, dull brown inside. Cf. Smetana-Scherrer 1982, p. 79, no 596, pl. 46.
106 (Laumonier 7344) fig. 27
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 4.4, th. 0.4. Wall: pointed lotus petals, possibly hand‑drawn. Rim: low ridge. Marked offset to wheelmade rim. Metallic gray gloss. Unusual motif, possibly not Attic.
107 (Laumonier 7339, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 27
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.7, th. at top 0.4. Five rows of imbricate lotus petals, either as calyx or wall decoration. Shiny black gloss, partly dark brown inside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 81, no 300, pl. 56, similar lotus petals combined with other stamps in a calyx.
108 (Laumonier 7079) fig. 27
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.5, th. at top. 0.4. Large, heavy bowl. Medallion: small eight‑petal rosette, within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: row of small, pointed, ribbed leaves. Wall: tall thin lotus petals with central rib and convex surfaces. Metallic black gloss, brown stacking circle inside. Traces of spiral string pattern on ridges around medallion and on lower parts of wall. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 47, no 23, pl. 5 and perhaps Edwards 1956, p. 101, no 76, pls. 46, 51.
109 (Laumonier 7338, Delos Museum B 7485) fig. 27
West of Lake, 1910. Wall fr. Max. dim. 6.1, th. 0.6. Wall: ca. eight rows of pointed petals, skewed to R. Rim: beading, double spiral. Dull gloss, mottled black to brown. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 360, no C 28, fig. 46 and Metzger 1971, p. 63‑64, no 102, pl. 13 (skewed imbricate pattern); Agora XXII, p. 48, no 34, pls. 6, 73 (imbricate petals).
110 (Laumonier 7312) fig. 27
Wall fr. Max. dim. 8.0, th. at top 0.18. Wall: ca. ten rows of small pointed ribbed leaves. Dull brown gloss outside, salmon red inside. Fabric unusual, possibly not Attic.

Fig. 27 — Pine-cone (103, 104) and imbricate bowls (105110).

Fig. 27 — Pine-cone (103, 104) and imbricate bowls (105–110).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff.

111 (Laumonier 7319) fig. 28
Fr. of bottom and wall, with small segment of rim pattern; surface very worn. Max. dim. 10.4, th. at top 0.3. Heavy, thick‑walled bowl. Medallion: indistinct, possibly Athena Parthenos, within two ridges. Wall: ca. 14 rows of overlapping small ribbed pointed leaves. Rim: guilloche between ridges, pairs of large double spirals. Dull brown gloss, black inside, mostly missing. For rim pattern, cf. Thompson 1934, p. 352‑353, no C 19, fig. 37. Probably second quarter of IInd c.
112 (A62 821) fig. 28
Archegesion 1962. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 4.9, th. 0.6. Medallion with two tiny dots, possibly Athena Parthenos, within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: parts of six rows of small pointed ribbed leaves, either of imbricate bowl or calyx of figured bowl. Fabric 7.5YR 6/6; dull black gloss. Other small frr. with small, ribbed, pointed imbricate leaves: D66 C3272 and D66 C4675 from Îlot des bijoux, Laumonier 7314, Laumonier 7315. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 56, no 104, pls. 18, 98 (Parthenos medallion with dots, Workshop of Bion).
113 (C61 C385+409) fig. 28
Îlot des comédiens. Two joining wall frr. Max. dim. 5.5, th. at top 0.2. Medallion missing, surrounded by ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: 14 rows of tiny overlapping pointed leaves. Dull black gloss.
114 (Laumonier 7303, Delos Museum B 7473) fig. 28
Terrace of Heraion, 1953. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 5.1, th. 0.25‑0.5. Medallion within ridge, scraped(?) groove, and ridge. Seven rows of very tiny pointed leaves, overlapping. Shiny black gloss, mostly missing outside.
115 (C62 C1766) fig. 28
Îlot des comédiens, 1962. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 2.6, th. 0.2. Six rows of tiny pointed leaves. Slightly shiny black gloss.
116 (Laumonier 7331, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 28
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Fr. of rim and upper wall. Est. diam. 15.5, max. dim. 10.2, th. 0.3. Wall: four to five rows of pointed ribbed leaves, irregularly placed with little overlap. Rim: three ridges, small double spirals above. Low rim, thin reddened scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Shiny chestnut brown gloss. Probably second quarter of IInd c. or later.

Fig. 28 — Imbricate bowls (111116).

Fig. 28 — Imbricate bowls (111–116).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.

117 (Laumonier 7301, Delos Museum B 3462) fig. 29
Two joining frr. with most of medallion and one‑fourth of circumference. H. 7.6, est. diam. 12.0. Medallion: 16‑petal rosette (plain rounded petals alternating with ribbed leaves) with eight‑petal rosette at center, perhaps stamped directly onto bowl, all within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: nine rows of small rounded ribbed leaves. Rim: two ridges. High rim with scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Slightly shiny brown gloss, dark red on underside and part of rim. Cf. Metzger 1971, p. 70, no 129, pl. 17:6; Agora XXII, p. 52, no 67, pl. 12 (medallion). Probably second quarter of IInd c. or later.

Fig. 29 — Imbricate bowl (117).

Fig. 29 — Imbricate bowl (117).

Scale 2/3.

(Drawing A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

Floral
118 (Laumonier 7364, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 30
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Fr. of bottom and half of lower wall. Max. dim. 9.5. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette with bead between each pair of petals, within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: row of small ribbed pointed leaves. Wall: alternating tall lotus petals and tendrils. Slightly shiny red to brown gloss outside, red inside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 51, no 62, pl. 10 and unpublished fr. P 37036 (deposit B 20:7, discarded ca. 200, for date see Agora XXXIII, p. 346). Before ca. 175.
119 (Laumonier 7355, Delos Museum B 7500) fig. 30
Aphrodision, 1957. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.5. Medallion: six‑petal rosette within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: two rows of small ribbed leaves. Wall: alternating grapevines and tall thin lotus petals. Shiny black gloss outside, brown stacking circle inside. Similar fr. from the Aphrodision: Gros 2013, fig. 4. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 328‑329, no A 74, figs. 11a, 11b. A bowl from the same mold, but made when that mold was fresher, was found at the Athenian Agora (P 34499, unpublished, from deposit N 21:9, discarded ca. 200).

Fig. 30 — Floral bowls (118, 119).

Fig. 30 — Floral bowls (118, 119).

Scale 2/3.

Dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [119].

120 (Laumonier 7363a, b, Delos Museum B 7472) fig. 31
Dioskourion at Phournoi, 1933. Two nonjoining frr. from middle (a) and upper (b) part of wall. Max. dim. (a) 4.4, (b) 3.1, th. 0.3‑0.4. Wall: tall, thin lotus petal flanked by grapevine. Rim: ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Metallic black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 52, no 65, pl. 11 (same leaf stamp).
121 (68E 3196) fig. 31
Îlot des bronzes, 1968. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 5.4, th. at edge 0.42. Medallion: frontal face, probably gorgon with two sets of wings, hair on either side of face, within three thin ridges, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: thin lotus petals alternating with wavy stems. Dull black gloss. For similar medallion (not Attic), see U. Hausmann, Hellenistische Keramik: Eine Brunnenfüllung nördlich von Bau C und Reliefkeramik verschiedener Fundplätze in Olympia, Olympische Forschungen 27 (1996), p. 95, no 217, pl. 41.
122 (Laumonier 7354) fig. 31
Wall fr. with edge of medallion Max. dim. 4.5. Medallion within two ridges, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: alternating tall lotus petals and thin frilly leaf. Dull black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 50, no 54, pl. 9.
Figured
123 (Laumonier 7522, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 31
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Wall fr. Max. dim. 7.7, th. 0.35. At L, flying Erotes face one another, that on the L holding kore mask, the other holding slave mask. Bird sitting R with wreath below. At R, antithetical rampant goats flank krater. Rim: ovolo between ridges, boukranion alternating with another motif above. Dull brown gloss. Another fr. of a hovering Eros: C63 C831 from Îlot des comédiens. Composition similar to bowls of Workshop A and the M Monogram Group (e.g., Agora XXII, p. 57, nos 108, 110, pl. 19), but no clearly matching stamps. Second quarter of IInd c.?
124 (Laumonier 7517, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 31
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 5.6, th. 0.3. Head of rampant goat facing L; Eros flying R and old man mask above. Shiny greenish black gloss. Similar to bowls of M Monogram Class, but no exact stamp match, and position of motifs on lower wall is unusual. Second quarter of IInd c.
125 (D66 C4032) fig. 31
Îlot des bijoux, 1966. Fr. of wall and medallion. Max. dim. 7.9. Medallion: ten(?)‑petal rosette within scraped groove and ridge. Calyx: three rows of widely spaced pointed ribbed leaves in high relief. Wall: pair of rampant goats flank ribbed krater, part of one goat of a second pair to R, Eros flying L between them. Dull black gloss, metallic inside. Similar: D66 C4696 from Îlot des bijoux. Generally similar to stamps of M Monogram Class (e.g., Agora XXII, p. 57, nos 109, 111, pls. 19, 20). Second quarter of IInd c.

Fig. 31 — Floral (120122) and figured bowls (123125).

Fig. 31 — Floral (120–122) and figured bowls (123–125).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [125], S. Rotroff [122].

126 (Laumonier 7565, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 32
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Three joining (a) and one nonjoining fr. (b) preserving medallion, much of calyx, small part of wall. Max. dim. (a) 10.6. Medallion: double four‑petal rosette within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: alternating small and large lotus petals, with small and medium sized petals between the tips. Swan sits L atop each large petal. Wall: legs of Erotes, probably flying alternately to L and R. Shiny black gloss outside, dark brown with wedge‑shaped stacking line inside. An unpublished fr. from the Athenian Agora may come from the same mold (P 22940); another has the same medallion and small lotus petal (P 36827, M 21:1). The medallion, Eros, and swan stamps occur in both the Workshop of Bion and Workshop A.

Fig. 32 — Figured bowl (126).

Fig. 32 — Figured bowl (126).

Scale 2/3.

Drawing A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

127 (C62 C3036) fig. 33
Îlot des comédiens, 1962. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 4.7, th. 0.38. Legs and wing of Eros flying R. Slightly shiny black gloss, much spalling. Two wide scraped grooves at top may be post burial damage. Motif derives from hovering Eros playing a musical instrument, known from bowls of the Workshop of Bion (Agora XXII, p. 70, no 212, pl. 82; M. L. Lawall et al. [n. 19], p. 428‑430, fig. 9). Second quarter of IInd c.?
128 (Laumonier 7529, Delos Museum B 3710) fig. 33
Fr. preserving about one‑fourth of bowl, from edge of medallion to rim. H. 10.7, est. diam. 12.0. Medallion within scraped groove and ridge. Calyx: two rows of small ribbed leaves. Wall: kneeling silenoi flanking krater alternate with frontal female figure turned slightly toward R. Rim: guilloche on slightly raised band. Scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Shiny black gloss, partly missing inside. Silenoi derivative from stamp in Workshop of Bion; cf. Thompson 1934, p. 356, no C 22, fig. 40, and 8. Woman moving R derivative from stamp in Workshop A; cf. Agora XXII, p. 72, no 225, pl. 83 at far right; see also Courby 1922, p. 349, fig. 72:34b. Second quarter of IInd c.
129 (Laumonier 7530, Delos Museum B 3586) fig. 33
Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.5, th. 0.4. Tip of petal of calyx below; kneeling silenoi flanking krater, frontal Nike at R; trace of stamp at R edge. Metallic black gloss. Silenoi similar but smaller than those on 128. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 77, no 265, pl. 53 (Nike). Second quarter of IInd c.
130 (68E 487 [number uncertain]) fig. 33
Îlot des bronzes, 1968. Wall fr. Max. dim. 3.4, th. 0.28. Frontal woman with situla in R hand (Amymone), lower part of another figure to L. Shiny black gloss. The Amymone stamp occurs in identical form in both the Workshop of Bion and Workshop A (e.g., Agora XXII, p. 70‑71, nos 214 and 216, pls. 42, 82). Before ca. 175.
131 (Laumonier 7524) fig. 33
Fr. probably from lower wall. Max. dim. 4.0, th. 0.32. Nude Apollo sits frontally with R hand resting on head; snake (or drapery folds?) at R. Frontal goat mask further R. Thin ridge above, possibly dividing scene from another above. Shiny black gloss, mottled to green inside. Possibly not Attic; confinement of figures to a register on the lower wall below a dividing ridge is not paralleled in Attica. Similar Apollo, but with tripod, Agora XXII, p. 72‑73, no 231, pl. 45 (view A). Similar but not identical goat masks occur on bowls of Workshop A and the M Monogram Class (e.g., ibid., p. 57, 71‑72, nos 110, 224, pls. 19, 83; Thompson 1934, p. 365, no C 45, fig. 49); more closely similar is Braun 1970, p. 156, no 185, fig. 26, pl. 73:2, from a level dating shortly before the middle of the IInd c. (Abschnitt IX, see Agora XXIX, p. 29 for the date). Probably second quarter of IInd c.
132 (Laumonier 7546, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 33
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.1, th. 0.25. Medallion within reddened scraped groove and thin ridge. Calyx: two rows of pointed ribbed leaves with tiny leaf tips at bottom. Wall: silenos standing under a tree, R. leg crossed over L, cloak hanging at R. To either side, draped female figures. Slightly dull black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 69, no 204, pl. 40, a similar silenos figure; for composition, cf. Smetana-Scherrer 1982, p. 77‑78, no 582, pl. 45.

Fig. 33 — Figured bowls (127132).

Fig. 33 — Figured bowls (127–132).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.

133 (Laumonier 7521) fig. 34
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 4.6, th. 0.22. Wall: bearded male strides L, looking back to R and holding small figure across his body; unidentified motif to R. Two slave masks above. Rim: two ridges. Slightly shiny black gloss. Cf. P. Perdrizet, Monuments figurés, petits bronzes, terres‑cuites, antiquités diverses, Fouilles de Delphes V (1908), p. 176, no 425, figs. 373a, 738 (probably not Attic).
134 (C64 C135) fig. 34
Îlot des comédiens, 1964. Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 5.9, th. 0.45. Wall: upper body and head of Zeus holding Ganymede across his body, looking up and R; eagle’s neck, head, and trace of wing at R. At L and R edges, bird flying L. Rim: ridge, egg and dart. Slightly light fabric (5YR 6/3); shiny black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 68, nos 199, 201, pls. 38, 81.
135 (C64 C135 bis) fig. 34
Îlot des comédiens, 1964. Lower wall fr. Max. dim. 3.7, th. 0.25. Hound running R, fronds(?) of calyx below. Shiny black gloss, stacking circle inside. For similar hounds, see Agora XXII, p. 75‑76, nos 252, 260, pls. 50, 52, 86.
136 (Laumonier 7561) fig. 34
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 10.9, th. at top 0.4. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette damaged in production, within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: row of small triangular lotus petals at base, large palmettes with triangular lotus petals between tips. Wall: legs of unidentified figures. Fabric 7.5YR 6/4; dull black gloss outside, metallic inside. For composition of calyx, cf. Agora XXII, p. 57, no 108, pl. 19.
137 (Laumonier 7575) fig. 34
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 11.0, th. at edge 0.5. Medallion: five radiating ribbed leaves within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: two to three rows of ribbed leaves. Wall: feet of large‑scale figures striding L. Thick, shiny black gloss, stacking circle inside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 81, no 306 (mold), pl. 57.

Fig. 34 — Figured bowls (133137) and medallion (138).

Fig. 34 — Figured bowls (133–137) and medallion (138).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

Medallion
138 (A62 916) fig. 34
Archegesion 1962. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 4.0, th. at edge 0.3. Medallion: Double rosette formed of radiating lotus petals, eight petals inside, 16 outside, with tiny beads in spaces between outer petals, all within thin ridge and scraped groove. Wall: tall lotus petals. Shiny black gloss. Scraped groove suggests Attic manufacture; cf. Agora XXII, p. 51, no 59, pl. 10, a rosette made of different stamps but also with a beaded background.
Rims
139 (Laumonier 7508, Delos Museum B 7485) fig. 35
West of Lake, 1910. Rim fr. Est. diam. 14.0, max. dim. 9.5, th. 0.33. Guilloche between ridges, pairs of double spirals crowned by small pointed ribbed leaf. Traces of figured or floral decoration below. Low rim, thin scraped groove below outturned lip. Shiny black gloss, patches missing outside.
140 (Laumonier 7505, Delos Museum B 2042) fig. 35
Rim fr. Est. diam. 15.5, max. dim. 8.1, th. 0.2. Guilloche between ridges, double spirals alternating with leaf. Offset to wheelmade rim; scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Metallic black gloss, spalling. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 357, no C 23, fig. 41.
141 (Laumonier 7511) fig. 35
Rim fr. Est. diam. 17.0, max. dim. 5.8, th. 0.32. Guilloche(?), ridge, pairs of double spirals crowned by palmette alternating with inverted ivy leaf. High rim with scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Dull black gloss, partly missing outside.
142 (C63 C348, C63 C865) fig. 35
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Two nonjoining rim frr. Est. diam. 13.0, max. dim. (a) 6.3, (b) 5.8, th. 0.28. Beading, guilloche, ridge, beading, running spiral, dolphins swimming L and R. Low rim with scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Shiny black gloss, much missing outside, metallic inside. Similar dolphins on an unpublished fr. from the Athenian Agora (P 37035, deposit B 20:7, discarded ca. 200, for date see Agora XXXIII, p. 346); for other motifs, see Agora XXII, p. 56, 82, nos 104, 313, pls. 18, 58, 98.
143 (D64 C1351) fig. 35
Îlot des bijoux, 1964. Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 3.6, th. 0.42. Coarse guilloche between ridges, perhaps a small rosette above. Traces of decoration on wall below. Metallic black gloss. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 69, 73, nos 207, 236, pls. 40, 45, 81, 85, 94. Second quarter of IInd c.
144 (Laumonier 7578) fig. 35
Rim fr. Max. dim. 3.5 th. 0.28. Eight(?)‑petal rosette, bud with leafy calyx and spiral tendril. Low rim, scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Shiny black gloss with metallic patches. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 54, no 87, pl. 15 and an unpublished floral bowl (P 37036, deposit B 20:7, discarded ca. 200, for date see Agora XXXIII, p. 346).
145 (C63 C780) fig. 35
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Rim fr. Max. dim. 3.9, th. 0.3. Double spirals, eight‑petal rosettes. Low rim with reddened scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Metallic black gloss. Possibly same rosette as Agora XXII, p. 48, 58, nos 32, 117, pls. 6, 21, 98.
146 (Laumonier 7507, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 35
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Rim. fr. Est. diam. 14.0, max. dim. 4.6, th. 0.25. Alternating ten(?)‑petal rosette and ribbed leaf. Low rim with scraped groove below sharply outturned lip. Shiny black gloss.

Fig. 35 — Rim and wall fragments (139146).

Fig. 35 — Rim and wall fragments (139–146).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.

Long‑petal, jeweled
Mold
147 (Laumonier 7167, Delos Museum B 7507) fig. 36
Rim fr. Max. dim. 2.8. Rim thickened to outside, with groove in top. Wall: tip of long petal. Rim: dotted jeweling between grooves. Hard fine fabric (5YR 6/4). Rim pattern as 148, 182. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 86, no 349 (mold), pl. 63; another, unpublished mold fr. also has this rim pattern (P 20051). This is probably one of the two Attic molds that Laumonier reported had been found on Delos (EAD XXXI, p. 2); the other is Courby 1922, p. 327, pl. IX:d = P. Hatzidakis 1997 (n. 93), p. 302, pl. 223:α, B.5906 (also for a long‑petal bowl).
Bowls
148 (Laumonier 7155) fig. 36
Rim fr. Est. diam. 13.0, max. dim. 6.5, th. at top of moldmade section 0.2. Wall: concave petals, jeweling topped by small, ribbed leaf. Rim: ridge and jeweling. Scraped groove below outturned lip. Shiny black gloss. Same rim pattern occurs on 182. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 105, no 107, pl. 49 (leaf atop jeweling); Agora XXII, p. 86, no 349 (mold), pl. 63 (rim pattern).
149 (Laumonier 7122) fig. 36
Courby 1922, pl. IX:b. Four joining frr. preserve about half of bowl. H. 7.0, est. diam. 13.5. Medallion: eight radiating lotus petals within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: concave petals, jeweling topped by ornament (bow? thyrsus?). Rim: two ridges. Scraped groove below outturned lip. Slightly metallic black gloss, dark red stacking circle inside. Same motif crowns jeweling on unpublished fr. from the Athenian Agora (P 19831); similar medallion on another (P 6016).

Fig. 36 — Mold for long-petal bowl (147), jeweled long-petal bowls (148, 149).

Fig. 36 — Mold for long-petal bowl (147), jeweled long-petal bowls (148, 149).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [149], S. Rotroff [147].

150 (Laumonier 7170) fig. 37
Two frr. preserving most of medallion and half of lower wall. Max. dim. 9.3. Medallion: eight radiating pointed lotus petals, within ridge, scraped groove, delicate ridge. Wall: concave petals, jeweling. Shiny black gloss, greenish inside.
151 (Laumonier 7128) fig. 37
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 5.3, th. at top of wheelmade section 0.28. Wall: flat petals, tiny jeweling topped by Rhodian rose. Rim: two narrow ridges. Offset to wheelmade rim. Slightly shiny black gloss.
152 (Laumonier 7149, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 37
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Rim fr. Est. diam. 15.0, max. dim. 8.8, th. at top of moldmade section 0.25. Wall: petals with tips dipping outward, jeweling topped by small diamond-shaped leaf. No rim pattern, but sharp offset to wheelmade rim. Scraped groove below outturned lip. Dull brown to black gloss, much missing outside, black inside. Others with small leaf: C64 C776 from Îlot des comédiens, Laumonier 7135. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 84, no 336, pl. 61.
153 (Laumonier 7131, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 37
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Wall fr. Max. dim. 5.8, th. at top 0.3. Wall: flat petals with slightly pointed tops, jeweling topped by small leaf with individual segments. Rim: one ridge. Offset to wheelmade rim. Dull black gloss. Cf. Rotroff 1983, p. 296, no 99, pl. 61, with perhaps the same leaf. Except for leaf, almost identical to 154.

Fig. 37 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (150153).

Fig. 37 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (150–153).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.

154 (Laumonier 7129+7130) fig. 38
Two joining frr. preserve part of rim and upper body. Est. diam. 14.0, max. dim. 10.4. Wall: flat petals with slightly pointed tops, five leftmost columns of jeweling topped by small seven‑petal palmette, rightmost columns topped by pointed ribbed leaves. Jeweling omitted between three petals at R, but ribbed leaf is inserted between tops of petals. Rim: one ridge. Offset to wheelmade rim. High, plain rim. Dull black gloss, possible double‑dipping mark inside and out. Almost identical to 153.
155 (Laumonier 7137 bis, Delos museum B 7483) fig. 38
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Wall fr. Max. dim. 7.3, th. at top 0.15. Flat petals alternating with jeweling, which is omitted between two petals. Shiny brown gloss, mottled greenish inside.
156 (Laumonier 7156) fig. 38
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 3.7, th. at top of moldmade section 0.28. Concave petal with bird facing R at L, probably at top of column of jeweling. Rim: one ridge. Lustrous brown gloss. Cf. Metzger 1971, p. 62, no 93, pl. 12.
157 (Laumonier 7125) fig. 38
Rim fr. Est. diam. 15.0, max. dim. 7.7, th. at top of moldmade section 0.33. Wall: flat petals, jeweling, all in low relief. Rim: light ridge, with thinner ridges above. Scraped groove below outturned lip. Slightly metallic black gloss.

Fig. 38 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (154157).

Fig. 38 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (154–157).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

158 (Laumonier 7124) fig. 39
Two joining frr. preserve segment from rim to lower body. Est. diam. 13.5, max. dim. 8.5, th. at top of moldmade section 0.29. Wall: flat petals, jeweling. Irregular offset to wheelmade rim; scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Shiny black gloss, mottled to greenish inside.
159 (Laumonier 7180) fig. 39
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 5.6, th. at edge 0.19. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette with large button center, within reddened scraped groove, two ridges, slight groove. Part of outer ridge missing, replaced by groove. Wall: concave petals, jeweling. Fabric 5YR 5/4; dull brown gloss, blacker inside. Retouched version of rosette of Workshop A, as also on 191.
160 (D61 C1468+D64 C1343) fig. 39
Îlot des bijoux, 1961, 1964. Two joining frr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.2, th. at edge 0.32. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette bordered by very thin ridge, within ridge and scraped groove. Wall: flat petals, jeweling. Dull red gloss, much missing outside.
161 (Laumonier 7176, Courby 587) fig. 39
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.8, th. at edge 0.27. Medallion: indistinct many‑petal rosette within scraped groove and low ridge. Wall: widely spaced, slightly concave petals applied with punch, crude jeweling. Shiny black gloss, partly brown inside.
162 (Laumonier 7173, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 39
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 9.0, th. at edge 0.37. Medallion: indistinct nine‑petal rosette within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: widely spaced concave petals, crude jeweling. Shiny black gloss, brown stacking circle inside. Rosette similar to that on 163.
163 (Laumonier 7181) fig. 39
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 6.2, th. at edge 0.42. Medallion: nine‑petal rosette within two ridges. Wall: widely spaced concave long petals, probably stamped, and jeweling. One large lime inclusion in fabric; dull brown gloss outside, much missing, shiny black inside. Rosette similar to that on 162.

Fig. 39 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (158163).

Fig. 39 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (158–163).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.

164 (68E 1825) fig. 40
Îlot des bronzes, 1968. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 6.2, th. at edge 0.32. Medallion: irregular eight‑petal rosette, within carelessly scraped groove and heavy ridge. Wall: flat petals, crude jeweling. Dull brown gloss, stacking circle inside.
165 (Laumonier 7174) fig. 40
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.6, th. at edge 0.33. Medallion: many‑petal rosette with alternating wide and narrow petals, within two ridges. Wall: petals, crude jeweling. Slightly shiny dark brown gloss, greenish inside with partial stacking circle. Possibly not Attic, despite fabric; form of rosette unparalleled among certainly Attic material.
166 (Laumonier 7210) fig. 40
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 4.9, th. at top 0.21. Convex petals outlined by ridges, alternating with jeweling. Slightly shiny dark brown gloss. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 106, no 109, pl. 49; Metzger 1971, p. 62, no 95, pl. 12; Agora XXII, p. 85, no 340, pl. 61.

Straight Rim

167 (Laumonier 7151, Delos Museum B 1450, Courby 602) fig. 40
Fr. preserving segment from lower wall to rim. Est. diam. 12.0, max. dim. 8.0. Wall: flat petals, jeweling topped by leaf growing from calyx. Rim: egg and dart between ridges. Straight rim with two deep grooves, possibly scraped. Shiny dark brown gloss with red patch outside. For the shape, cf. Agora XXII, p. 51, no 62, pls. 10, 92 and Smetana-Scherrer 1982, p. 79, no 602, pl. 46 (floral); Agora XXVII, p. 192, no 189, pl. 47 (long‑petal).
168 (Laumonier 7123, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 40
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Fr. preserving section from lower wall to rim. Est. diam. 11.0, max. dim. 9.6, th. at top of moldmade section 0.18. Wall: concave petals, tiny jeweling topped by small bud or leaf in calyx. Marked offset to vertical wheelmade rim with two reddened scraped grooves. Dull brown to dark red gloss.
169 (D66 C3495+C3496) fig. 40
Îlot des bijoux, 1966. Two joining frr. preserving part of rim and wall. P.H. 9.0, est. diam. 10.5, th. at top of moldmade section 0.32. Wall: concave petals, jeweling topped by indistinct motif, possibly the same as that on 168. Rim: two ridges. Marked offset to vertical wheelmade rim with two grooves, perhaps scraped. Very micaceous clay; dull red gloss, mostly missing outside, red to brown inside. Similar and also fired red: 67E 1673 from Îlot des bronzes.

Fig. 40 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (164169).

Fig. 40 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (164–169).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

Swirling petals

170 (Laumonier 7190, Delos Museum B 4335) fig. 41
Courby, p. 332, pl. IX:c. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.2, th. at edge 0.17. Medallion: radiating overlapping seven‑petal palmettes within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Long petals swirling to R, separated by jeweling. Shiny black gloss, mostly missing.
171 (C63 C294) fig. 41
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Two joining frr. preserve bottom and part of lower wall. Max. dim. 8.6, th. at edge 0.27. Medallion: two rounds of radiating small pointed lotus petals (seven inside, ten outside), surrounded by eight radiating palmettes, all within two ridges. Wall: long petals swirling to L, separated by jeweling. Black to brown gloss, mostly missing outside, spalling inside.
172 (C63 C1‑66 [number partly effaced]) fig. 41
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Wall fr. Max. dim. 3.1. Parts of two petals swirling to R, jeweling between them. Each petal contains a letter: Α and Ρ, ΑΡ[ΙΣΤΩΝΟΣ]? Dull black gloss. For signature, cf. Agora XXII, p. 93, no 410, pl. 97; Courby 1922, pl. IX:e (non-Attic[?] filter jugs); R. H. Howland, (n. 100), p. 176‑177, 216, nos 686‑689, 850, 851, pls. 24, 26 (Attic lamps).
173 (C63 C323+C562) fig. 41
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Two joining upper wall frr. Max. dim. 5.2, th. 0.35. Wall: tops of two long petals oriented to R.; between them, jeweling topped by leaf. Rim: ridge and ovolo, wide reddened scraped groove above. Dull black gloss, brown inside, much missing.
174 (59 S 104) fig. 41
Maison aux stucs 1959. Two nonjoining wall frr. Max. dim. (a) 4.7, (b) 3.6. Long petals swirling to L, bordered by beading. Dull gray gloss. Cf. Schwabacher 1941, p. 218, pl. VII A 9; a similar bowl (verified as Attic by a scraped groove) has been found at the Athenian Agora (P 25313, unpublished). Possibly from same bowl as 175, but gloss does not match.
175 (59 S 104 bis) fig. 41
Maison aux stucs. Wall fr. Max. dim. 4.4. Long petal swirling to L, bordered by beading. Rim: two ridges. Dull brown to red gloss outside, red inside. Possibly from the same bowl as 174.

Fig. 41 — Jeweled long-petal bowls with swirling petals (170175).

Fig. 41 — Jeweled long-petal bowls with swirling petals (170–175).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; ph. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.

Long‑petal, plain
176 (Laumonier 7093, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 42
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Three joining frr. preserving small segment of lip and one‑fourth of upper wall. P.H. 5.5, est. diam. 14.0, th. at top of moldmade section 0.3. Wall: concave petals. Rim: ovolo. Irregular offset to wheelmade rim; scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Dull brown gloss, gray inside. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 386, no D 48, fig. 74; Agora XXII, p. 83, no 323, pl. 58.
177 (Laumonier 7094, Delos Museum B 7483) fig. 42
East of Lake, 1926, 1929. Two nonjoining frr. of rim and upper wall. Est. diam. 15.0, max. dim. (a) 9.0, (b) 5.7, th. at top of moldmade section 0.2. Wall: flat petals. Rim: ovolo over ridge, broad groove above. Scraped groove below sharply outturned lip. Slightly shiny red to brown gloss. Cf. Rotroff 1983, p. 297, no 103, pl. 61.
178 (Laumonier 7100) fig. 42
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 3.8, th. 0.32. Wall: concave petals with slight ears. Rim: delicate egg and dart between thin ridges, reddened scraped groove above. Shiny black gloss. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 105, no 104, pls. 49, 51 (mold).
179 (Laumonier 7205) fig. 42
Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 4.0, th. at top 0.22. Wall: long petals. Rim: egg and dart between thin ridges. Shiny black to brown gloss, black inside.
180 (Laumonier 7103) fig. 42
Rim fr. Est. diam. 14.5, max. dim. 4.9, th. 0.22. Wall: flat petals. Wall: heart‑shaped elements of guilloche oriented with point down. Offset to low wheelmade rim; scraped groove below outturned lip. Dull black gloss, partly missing outside. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 83, no 322, pls. 59, 87.
181 (Laumonier 7102, Delos Museum B 7495) fig. 42
Letoon, 1947. Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 2.7, th. 0.24. Wall: slightly concave petals. Rim: heavy beading, heart‑shaped elements of guilloche oriented with point down. Offset to wheelmade rim. Shiny black gloss. Widely spaced beading very rare among Attic material, so may not be Attic despite quality of fabric. Cf. 194, also with beading and fine black gloss.
182 (Laumonier 7099) fig. 42
Rim fr. Est. diam. 15.0, max. dim. 6.2, th. at top of moldmade section 0.23. Wall: contiguous petals. Rim: jeweling between low ridges. Slight offset to wheelmade rim; scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Slightly shiny black gloss. Another with this rim pattern: C62 C2638 from Îlot des comédiens. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 86, no 349 (mold), pl. 63.
183 (Laumonier 7098, Delos Museum B 1500Γ) fig. 42
Rim fr. Est. diam. 13.0, max. dim. 7.0, th. at top of moldmade section 0.23. Wall: flat petals. Rim: bead and reel between ridges. Scraped groove below outturned lip. Dull brown gloss, shinier inside.

Fig. 42 — Plain long-petal bowls (176–183).

Fig. 42 — Plain long-petal bowls (176–183).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.

184 (Laumonier 7002) fig. 43
Four joining frr. preserving small part of rim and one third of wall. P.H. 11.0, est. diam. 19.5, th. at top of moldmade section 0.33. Remarkably large bowl. Wall: flat petals with ears and pointed tips. Rim: two broad, low ridges. High rim with scraped groove below strongly outturned lip. Dull black gloss with darker wedge inside, stacking or dipping mark.
185 (Laumonier 7052) fig. 43
Rim fr. Est. diam. 13.0, max. dim. 7.7, th. at top of moldmade section 0.27. Wall: flat petals with outturned tips. Rim: two ridges. Sharp offset to wheelmade rim; reddened scraped groove below sharply outturned lip. Slightly metallic black gloss, black and slightly metallic inside.
186 (Laumonier 7049) fig. 43
Rim fr. Est. diam. 13.0, max. dim. 7.8, th. at top of wheelmade section 0.3. Wall: flat petals. Rim: three thin ridges. Reddened scraped groove below outturned lip. Dull greenish brown gloss.
187 (Laumonier 7053, Courby 375) fig. 43
Rim and wall fr. Est. diam. 14.0, max. dim. 7.6, th. at top of moldmade section 0.2. Wall: flat petals, tips nod out slightly. Rim: two ridges. Reddened scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Slightly light fabric (5YR 6/3); thin, metallic brown gloss with darker wedge inside, stacking or dipping mark.

Fig. 43 — Plain long-petal bowls (184187).

Fig. 43 — Plain long-petal bowls (184–187).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.

188 (Laumonier 7003) fig. 44
Two joining frr. preserve one‑third of rim and upper wall. Est. diam. 13.3, th. at top of moldmade section 0.35. Wall: concave petals. Offset to wheelmade rim; scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Dull brown to red gloss.
189 (C62 C1550) fig. 44
Îlot des comédiens, 1962. Wall fr. Est. diam. at top of wall 15.0, max. dim. 5.9, th. 0.28. Wall: flat petals; six letters of illegible partial signature in one petal. Rim: single ridge preserved. Shiny black to tan gloss.
190 (Laumonier 7012, Delos Museum B 7488) fig. 44
Houses south of theater, 1930. Three joining frr. preserving segment of lip and part of upper body. Est. diam. 13.0, max. dim. 12.0, th. at top of moldmade section 0.26. Wall: coarse, irregular petals. No rim pattern. Scraped groove below slightly outturned lip. Dull brown to red gloss.
191 (Laumonier 7064) fig. 44
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 5.7, th. at edge 0.25. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette within two ridges. Wall: long petals. Dull black gloss, mottled to brown inside. Retouched version of rosette of Workshop A, as also on 159.

Fig. 44 — Plain long-petal bowls (188–191).

Fig. 44 — Plain long-petal bowls (188–191).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.

192 (Laumonier 7061) fig. 45
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 13.0, th. at top 0.25. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette perhaps stamped directly onto bowl, within irregular scraped groove and two ridges. Wall: concave petals. Dull brown gloss, black inside. Fine curved lines on part of ridge around medallion, probably string marks.
193 (Laumonier 7067) fig. 45
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.4, th. at top 0.24. Medallion: indistinct eight‑petal rosette within two ridges and scraped groove. Wall: concave petals. Dull brown gloss, much missing outside. Others with similar medallion: Laumonier 7204+7207, Laumonier 7035.
194 (Laumonier 7108) fig. 45
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 5.8, th. at top 0.23. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette within widely spaced beading and two ridges. Wall: flat petals. Thick dull black gloss, mottled to brown inside. Possibly not Attic, although similar widely spaced beads occur around the medallion of an unpublished bowl at the Athenian Agora (P 36705 from deposit O 17:5, largely Sullan destruction debris). Cf. 181, a rim frr. with similar beading.
195 (Laumonier 7113) fig. 45
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 11.4, th. at top 0.21. Medallion: double rosette with 12 petals outside, 11 inside, within scraped groove and ridge. Wall: flat petals. Dull red gloss, red wedge inside, stacking or dipping mark. Same medallion appears on an unpublished fr. of a long‑petal bowl from the Athenian Agora (P 27225); for a similar medallion, but larger, cf. Agora XXII, p. 69, no 207, pls. 40, 81, a figured bowl of the second quarter of the IInd c.

Fig. 45 — Plain long-petal bowls (192195).

Fig. 45 — Plain long-petal bowls (192–195).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton.

196 (Laumonier 7186, Delos Museum B 7487) fig. 46
Autour du musée 1928‑1931. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.1, th. at edge 0.3. Medallion: double six‑petal rosette poorly centered within ridge and groove. Wall: long petals. Dull mottled red gloss, mostly missing outside. Cf. Edwards 1956, p. 106, no 116, pl. 49. Similar to rosette of M Monogram Class (Thompson 1934, p. 359, no C 26, fig. 44; Agora XXII, p. 57, no 113, pls. 20, 94), but larger.
197 (Laumonier 7110) fig. 46
Fr. of bottom. Max. dim. 6.9, th. at edge 0.2. Medallion: double six‑petal rosette with traces of petals of a third rosette outside, largely obscured by surrounding row of small ribbed leaves, all within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: long petals. Slightly shiny black gloss, red on medallion.
198 (Laumonier 7029) fig. 46
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 10.6, th. at top 0.16. Medallion: 13‑petal rosette, some petals pointed, some round, within fine ridge, ridge, and scraped groove. Wall: flat petals. Fabric 7.5YR 7/6; slightly shiny greenish black gloss, blacker inside.
199 (C63 C1439) fig. 46, 51
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.1, th. at top 0.15. Medallion: center blank, with eight radiating small triangular petals, within ridge, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: flat petals. Thin, dull brown gloss, reddish brown stacking circle inside. Horizontal grooves on one side of lower wall, probably string marks. Closely similar gloss on other frr. of long‑petal bowls, three plain (Laumonier 7072, 7072b, 7073) and one jeweled (Laumonier 7179), probably all from one producer.
200 (Laumonier 7069, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 46
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 5.3, th. at edge 0.39. Medallion: rounded petals oriented with tops toward center, within reddened scraped groove and two ridges. Shiny black gloss, red stacking circle inside. For orientation of petals, cf. Agora XXII, p. 86, no 356, pl. 64.
201 (Laumonier 7030, Delos Museum B 1495Γ) fig. 46
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 8.8, th. at top 0.25. Medallion: plain, within scraped groove and two ridges. Wall: flat petals. Slightly shiny greenish black gloss. Others with plain medallions: C63 C2248 from Îlot des comédiens, Laumonier 7006. For plain medallions, cf. Thompson 1934, p. 385, no D 44, figs. 73a, 73b; Edwards 1956, p. 106, nos 114, 115 (molds), pl. 49; Agora XXII, p. 86, no 350, pl. 63 (mold).

Fig. 46 — Plain long-petal bowls (196–201).

Fig. 46 — Plain long-petal bowls (196–201).

Scale 2/3.

202 (Laumonier 7059, Delos Museum B 7476) fig. 47
South of Samothrakeion, 1924. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.1, th. at top 0.32. Medallion: plain or effaced, within low, narrow ridge and irregular scraped groove. Wall: flat petals, irregularly spaced. Dull black gloss, brown on medallion.
203 (Laumonier 7111, Delos Museum B 2671) fig. 47
Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 7.9, th. at edge 0.27. Medallion: four large heart‑shaped spirals oriented with points inward to make eight‑petal rosette, a dot within each segment and at center, all within two ridges and possible scraped groove. Wall: flat petals. Dull brown gloss, much missing outside. Possibly not Attic; the medallion is not paralleled in the Attic corpus, the usual scraped groove may be absent, and the round-bottomed shape is unusual.
204 (Laumonier 7044, Delos Museum B 7475) fig. 47
Serapeion C, 1953. Single fr. preserves bottom and segment of full profile. H. 5.5, est. diam. 8.5. Medallion: eight‑petal rosette within scraped groove and low ridge. Wall: widely spaced, slightly concave petals, coming to points at bottom. No rim pattern. Scraped groove below gently outturned lip. Slightly metallic light brown gloss, darker on rim. Interior irregular, with wheel ridging. Two possibly Attic wall frr. also have widely spaced petals: Laumonier 7045, Laumonier 7047.

Fig. 47 — Plain long-petal bowls (202–204).

Fig. 47 — Plain long-petal bowls (202–204).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.

Concentric-Semicircle
205 (C63 C2346) fig. 48
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. EAD XXVII, p. 240, no D 3, pl. 40. Four joining frr. preserve one‑third of rim and wall. P.H. 7.2, est. diam. 13.5. Wall: three sets of ten pendant semicircles with single vertical line at center. Below, small imbricate pointed lotus petals. Rim: ovolo between ridges. High rim with reddened scraped groove below strongly outturned lip. Thin, dull brown gloss outside, partly missing, shiny black inside. Cf. Thompson 1934, p. 406, no E 78, figs. 95a, 95b.

Fig. 48Concentric-semicircle bowl (205).

Fig. 48 — Concentric-semicircle bowl (205).

Scale 2/3.

Dr. A. Hooton.

206 (Laumonier 7336, Courby 412) fig. 49
Fr. of bottom and wall. Max. dim. 9.1. Small medallion within two ridges. Calyx: alternating short and tall pointed lotus petals, hand drawn. Short petals have double, jeweled ribs; tall petals have single ribs flanked by jeweling or wavy lines. Wall: three semicircles hang from rim, with jeweling or diagonal strokes between them and a double spiral at the center. Space between semicircles and calyx filled by small, crude crescents. Rim: single ridge preserved. Fabric slightly outside standard range (7.5YR 6/4); thin, gritty, brown gloss with dark wedge inside, stacking or dipping mark. Cf. Agora XXII, p. 91, no 402, pls. 68, 89 (not Attic). Similar crescents occur on Attic imbricate bowls from contexts of the first third of the IInd c. (Agora XXVII, p. 191, no 186, pl. 47 and unpublished frr. P 31707, P 31723); cf. also Schwabacher 1941, p. 217, pl. VIII A 10.
207 (Laumonier 7316, Delos museum B 7487) fig. 49
Autour du musée 1928‑1931. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 4.5, th. at edge 0.4. Medallion: ten(?)‑petal rosette within two ridges. Wall: concentric semicircles above with beading between ridges; area below filled with imbricate pointed ribbed leaves. Shiny brown gloss, darker inside.
208 (D66 C3474) fig. 49
Îlot des bijoux, 1966. Upper wall fr. Max. dim. 5.0, th. 0.23. Wall: at L, parts of six semicircular ridges, jeweling between the outer two. To R, a small leaf and part of another ridge. Rim: two low ridges. Dull brown gloss, partly missing outside.

Fig. 49 — Concentric-semicircle (206-208) and network bowls (209, 211).

Fig. 49 — Concentric-semicircle (206-208) and network bowls (209, 211).

Scale 2/3.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.

Network
209 (C63 C2452) fig. 49
Îlot des comédiens, 1963. Fr. of lower wall and bottom. Max. dim. 6.1, th. at top 0.27. Medallion: radiating small pointed leaves, within ridge, reddened scraped groove, and ridge. Calyx: row of small ribbed pointed leaves. Wall: lower parts of three pentagonal sections, each framing a delicate hand‑drawn tendril. Shiny black gloss.
210 (Laumonier 6103, Delos Museum B 3851) fig. 50
Medallion, one‑third of body and one‑fifth of rim, partly restored. H. 12.3, est. diam. 22.8. Medallion: six‑petal rosette from which small petals radiate, within two ridges, scraped groove, and ridge. Wall: network of diamonds, with row of triangles at top and bottom. Filling motif in compartments of each row: tear in lowest, lozenges in central ones, and stylized floral in top row. Small single jewels in central row. Rim: upside-down ovolo between low ridges. High, straight rim with scraped groove below sharply outturned lip. Dull red gloss, much missing.

Fig. 50 — Network bowl (210).

Fig. 50 — Network bowl (210).

Scale 1/2.

Dr. A. Hooton.

Fig. 51String marks on the bottoms of Athenian bowls on Delos, at left (74, 75, 199) and at the Athenian Agora, at right (inv. nos P 18670, P 22191 [Agora XXII, nos. 101, 110], P 9668).

Fig. 51 — String marks on the bottoms of Athenian bowls on Delos, at left (74, 75, 199) and at the Athenian Agora, at right (inv. nos P 18670, P 22191 [Agora XXII, nos. 101, 110], P 9668).

Scale 1/1.

Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis.

211 (C62 C1713) fig. 49
Îlot des comédiens, 1962. Fr. of bottom and lower wall. Max. dim. 5.9, th. at edge 0.18. Small bowl, probably less than 8.0. in diameter. Medallion: 12‑petal rosette, perhaps with small rosette at center directly stamped onto bowl, all within low ridge. Calyx: small widely spaced triangular petals. Wall: network of ribbed petals forming six‑petal flowers. Soft orange clay (7.5YR 7/6) with small white inclusions; dull brown gloss, mostly missing outside. Possibly Attic despite unusual fabric. Cf. Schwabacher 1941, p. 222, pl. IX A 9, 10; Agora XXII, p. 87, no 364, pl. 65; and two unpublished frr. from the Athenian Agora (P 20168, P 24238).
Haut de page

Bibliographie

Agora XXII = S. IRotroff, Hellenistic Pottery: Athenian and Imported Moldmade Bowls, The Athenian Agora XXII (1982).

Agora XXVII = R. F. Townsend, The East Side of the Agora: The Remains beneath the Stoa of Attalos, The Athenian Agora XXVII (1995).

Agora XXIX = S. I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery: Athenian and Imported Wheelmade Tableware and Related Material, The Athenian Agora XXIX (1997).

Agora XXXIII = S. I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery: The Plain Wares, The Athenian Agora XXXIII (2006)

Benndorf 1869‑1883 = O. Benndorf, Griechische und sicilische Vasenbilder (1869‑1883).

Braun 1970 = K. Braun, “Der Dipylon-Brunnen B1: die Funde”, MDAI(A) 85 (1970), p. 129‑269.

Courby 1922 = F. Courby, Les vases grecs à reliefs, BEFAR 125 (1922).

EAD XXXI = A. Laumonier, La céramique hellénistique à reliefs, 1, Ateliers “ioniens”, EAD XXXI (1977).

Edwards 1956 = G. R. Edwards, “Hellenistic Pottery”, in Small Objects from the Pnyx 2, Hesperia Suppl. 10 (1956), p. 79‑112.

Gros 2013 = J.‑S. Gros, “La céramique hellénistique à Délos: Essai de quantification des productions dans le matériel des fouilles de l’aphrodision des Stèsiléos”, in N. Fenn, C. Römer-Strehl (eds), Networks in the Hellenistic World: According to the Pottery in the Eastern Mediterranean and Beyond, BAR International Series 2539 (2013), p. 143‑152.

Hausmann 1959 = U. Hausmann, Hellenistische Reliefbecher aus attischen und böotischen Werkstätten: Untersuchungen zur Zeitstellung und Bildüberlieferung (1959).

Metzger 1971 = I. R. Metzger, “Piräus-Zisterne”, AD 26, A’ (1971), p. 41‑94.

Rogl 2004‑2005 = c. Rogl, “Ein hellenistischer Herrscher auf einem attischen Trinkbecher des Kunsthistorischen Museums in Wien”, Jahrbuch des Kunsthistorischen Museums in Wien 6‑7 (2004‑2005), p. 241‑249.

Rotroff 1983 = S. I. Rotroff, “Three Cistern Systems on the Kolonos Agoraios”, Hesperia 52 (1983), p. 257‑297.

Rotroff 2013 = S. I. Rotroff, “Bion International: Branch Pottery Workshops in the Hellenistic Age”, in N. Fenn, c. Römer-Strehl (eds), Networks in the Hellenistic World: According to the Pottery in the Eastern Mediterranean and Beyond, BAR International Series 2539 (2013), p. 15‑23.

Schwabacher 1941 = W. Schwabacher, “Hellenistische Reliefkeramik im Kerameikos”, AJA 45 (1941), p. 182‑228.

Smetana-Scherrer 1982 = R. Smetana-Scherrer, “Spätklassische und hellenistische Keramik”, in H. Walter (ed.), Alt-Ägina II.i (1982), p. 76‑83.

Thompson 1934 = H. A. Thompson, “Two Centuries of Hellenistic Pottery”, Hesperia 3 (1934), p. 311‑480.

Haut de page

Notes

1 EAD XXXI, p. 1. Courby had spent much time on the island and participated in the great excavations of 1904‑1914; he was, however, primarily an architectural historian, and it is a bit of a mystery why he took up the study of these objects. A family website provides interesting information about his life (http://sainte.memoire.free.fr).

2 “Chronique des fouilles et découvertes archéologiques en 1956: Délos”, BCH 81 (1957), p. 710‑711, the report of what was probably the first season Laumonier devoted to the project.

3 EAD XXXI.

4 P. Bruneau et al., L’îlot de la Maison des comédiens, EAD XXVII (1970), p. 240, no D 3 bis. A second Attic long‑petal bowl (p. 240, no D 2, pl. 40) is also absent, though a third bowl (no D 3) is in Laumonier’s trays, as are many unpublished fragments from the Îlot des comédiens. For Ptolemaios as an Attic lamp‑maker, see P. Bruneau, Les Lampes, EAD XXVI (1965), p. 47‑48.

5 More have come to light since Laumonier’s day: e.g., from the Aphrodision of Stesileos (Gros 2013, p. 147‑149, figs. 4‑6), from the Maison des sceaux (A. Peignard, “La vaisselle de la Maison des Sceaux, Délos”, in Δ’ Επιστηµονική συνάντηση για την ελληνιστική κεραµική: Χρονολογικά προβλήµατα, κλειστά σύνολα – εργαστήρια, Πρακτικά [1997], p. 313), and from excavations of the Greek Archaeological Service in the Agora of the Italians and the street north of the Monument of the Lions (Ph. Zapheiropoulou, P. Hatzidakis, “Agora of the Italians, Niche of Publius Satricanius”, in Hellenistic Pottery from the Aegean [1994], p. 37, fig. 10:1; eid., “Δῆλος – Κεραµικὴ ἀπὸ τὸν δρόµο βόρεια τοῦ Ἀνδήρου τῶν Λεόντων”, in Γ’ Ἐπιστηµονικὴ συνάντηση γιὰ τὴν ἐλληνιστικὴ κεραµική· Χρονολογηµένα σύνολα – ἐργαστήρια, 24‑27 Σεπτεµβρίου 1991 Θεσσαλονίκη [1994], p. 240, pl. 184:b).

6 For a fuller description of these features, see Agora XXII, p. 14‑15.

7 Neutron activation analysis of a small sample of bowls from the Agora Excavations provides chemical information on the fabric (Agora XXXIII, Appendix B, p. 393‑399).

8 The only instances known to me are on Lemnos (in a production that is closely related to Attic, possibly founded by Attic potters) and at Corinth. M. Massa, La ceramica ellenistica con decorazione a rilievo della bottega di Efestia, Monografie della Scuola archeologica di Atene e delle missioni italiane in Oriente 5 (1992), p. 121, 124, 153, nos C 12, C 27, C 229, pls. 6, 9, 38 (Lemnos); c. M. Edwards, “Corinth 1980: Molded Relief Bowls”, Hesperia 50 (1981), p. 194 (C‑64‑335, C‑69‑238).

9 Courby 1922, p. 332‑333, 360‑362.

10 Thompson 1934.

11 Thompson 1934, p. 458‑459.

12 Large numbers of fragments were published by Schwabacher (1941) and Edwards (1956). Smaller numbers appear in publications of deposits at the Kerameikos (Braun 1970) and the Piraeus (Metzger 1971).

13 Agora XXII.

14 Many fragments of Athenian moldmade bowls from Aigina (Smetana-Scherrer 1982) and from fills on the east side of the Athenian Agora (Agora XXVII). For smaller studies, each with a few new vessels and presenting some chronological support or adjustment, see Rotroff 1983, p. 257‑297; ead., “The Satyr Cistern in the Athenian Agora”, in Γ’ Ἐπιστηµονικὴ συνάντηση γιὰ τὴν ἑλληνιστικὴ κεραµική· Χρονολογηµένα σύνολα ‑‑ ἐργαστήρια, 24‑27 Σεπτεµβρίου 1991 Θεσσαλονίκη (1994), p. 17‑22; ead., “A Sullan Deposit at the Athenian Agora,” in ΕΕπιστηµονικ συνάντηση για την ελληνιστικ κεραµική: Χρονολογικά προβλήµατα, κλειστά σύνολα ‑‑ εργαστήρια, Πρακτικά (2000), p. 375‑380; Rotroff 2013; and items in n. 19, 28, 64, 68, 89, and 90.

15 More elaborate vessels, such as amphoras, kraters, or filter‑jugs, are represented by only a few fragments in the trays (e.g., 54, 92). Laumonier placed this material in a different category and thus a different storage place, which I did not discover until this study was nearing completion, and it lies outside my assignment. A brief examination of the material, however, did not reveal any pieces that I could identify with certainty as Attic. Shapes documented at the Athenian Agora include cups, kantharoi, kraters, amphoras, jugs, and perhaps filter jugs; Agora XXII, p. 39, pls. 69‑71, 89‑91; Agora XXIX, p. 123‑124, 130, 139‑141, 183, figs. 33, 44, 45, 73, pls. 45, 50, 57‑59, 87.

16 For Laumonier’s numbering system, see EAD XXXI, p. 487.

17 I found a total of 448 non-joining fragments or sections of bowls in Laumonier’s trays, 382 of which are certainly Attic and another 42 probably are. In a few cases, it is very likely that nonjoining pieces belong to the same object, reducing the estimate of bowls represented to 366 certainly and 39 probably Attic. The trays also contain fragments of 24 nonjoining pieces (from 22 objects) that are not Attic, the most intriguing of which is a complete bowl that can be attributed to the region of Sardis (Laumonier 5889).

18 For the criteria used for attribution, see Agora XXII, p. 25‑26.

19 For the shop, see Agora XXII, p. 26‑27; M. L. Lawall, A. Jawando, K. M. Lynch, J. K. Papadopoulos, S. I. Rotroff, “Notes from the Tins 2: Research in the Stoa of Attalos”, Hesperia 71 (2002), p. 428‑430; and Rotroff 2013. In addition to the Agora material, many more pieces from this shop can be recognized among material from the Pnyx (Edwards 1956), the Kerameikos (Schwabacher 1941), and elsewhere.

20 Rotroff 2013, p. 15‑17.

21 Agora XXII, p. 30‑31.

22 Agora P 36828 (unpublished). Stamps characteristic of the workshop on this piece include an old‑man mask, a sprinting Eros, and the rare dancing Erotes mentioned above.

23 Agora XXII, p. 61, 70, nos 147, 209, pls. 27, 41, 78.

24 A. Laumonier, “Bols hellénistiques à reliefs: un bâtard gréco-italien”, BCH Suppl. 1 (1973), p. 256.

25 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 61, no 147, pls. 27, 78.

26 See Agora XXII, p. 28‑29 for a full account of the workshop.

27 For recurring rim and medallion motifs, see Agora XXII, pl. 98.

28 S. IRotroff, “The Long‑Petal Bowl from the Pithos Settling Basin”, Hesperia 57 (1988), p. 87‑93.

29 Hausmann 1959, p. 26‑27, n. 107, pls. 2‑7.

30 Hausmann 1959, p. 108‑109, n. 106 and 107. Twenty‑two of these belong in the core series discussed below, distinguished by rim pattern and monumental figures (nos 2‑14, 16, 18‑20, 24‑27, 29). Five (nos 1, 15, 21‑23) differ in important details but are clearly related to the core series; four more (nos 28, 30‑32) are products of the Workshop of Bion, and one (no 17) belongs to the M Monogram Class.

31 Among the additions are four published in Agora XXII, p. 65‑67, 73, nos 181, 192, 233, 234, pls. 33, 35, 45, 84, nine from Delos (published here), and several in museum collections: Frankfurt University 135 (CVA Frankfurt am Main 4 [Germany 66], 48, pl. 23 [3268]:1, 2), Vienna KHM IV 4551 (Rogl 2004‑2005); Zurich 2543 (CVA Zurich [Switzerland 2], p. 40, Beilage 8:2, pl. 26 [68]:10, 12); Benndorf 1869‑1883, pls. 59:2, 60:3, 61:2; S. Weston, “Explanation of an Antique Bacchanalian Cup”, Archaeologia 17 (1814), p. 113‑114, pl. 10.

32 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 73, no 233, pls. 45, 84.

33 An eleven‑frond palmette with the tips of the fronds turned upwards, and a seven‑frond palmette with the tips turned downwards. The details are rarely well preserved, even on bowls that are otherwise quite fresh.

34 This medallion occurs on at least eight bowls in the workshop; e.g., Athens NM 2099 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 6:1, clearer in Benndorf’s drawing, Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 59:3b); Athens NM 2348 and 2349, from the same mold (Hausmann 1959, pls. 8:2, 9:1); Paris Louvre MNB 3012 (CVA Louvre 15 [France 23], p. 4, pl. 4 [976]:4); and Vienna KHM IV 4551 (Rogl 2004‑2005, p. 245‑247, figs. 2, 7).

35 The others are Athens NM 2347 (Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 60:3c) and E1091 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 7:2), Frankfurt University 135 (CVA Frankfurt am Main 4 [Germany 66], p. 48, pl. 23 [3268]:2).

36 Most easily observed on Hausmann 1959, pls. 2, 4‑9.

37 Courby 1922, p. 346, fig. 71:28a, 28b, 28g, 28h, 28n. For comparanda, see the individual entries in the catalogue below.

38 NM 2345 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 7:1). See also drawings in Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 61:1 and, less attractive but more accurate, A. Dumont and J. Chaplain, Les céramiques de la Grèce proper (1888), pl. 40:3.

39 Hausmann 1959, p. 108, n. 107, under no 27.

40 As has also been recognized by O. Deubner (Hellenistische Apollogestalten [1934], p. 65, no 35) and H. Temporini (“Die Milesischen Münzen der jüngeren Faustina: Zur Vorlage eines Ineditum der Tübinger Sammlung”, in Praestant Interna: Festschrift für Ulrich Hausmann zum 65. Geburtstag am 13. August 1982 [1982], p. 361‑362).

41 G. Kawerau, A. Rehm, Das Delphinion in Milet, Milet: Ergebnisse der Ausgrabungen und Untersuchungen seit dem Jahre 1899 III (1914), p. 410‑411, figs. 100 (coin), 101 (relief); H. Temporini, (n. 40), pl. 77. The statue has been identified with the one presented by Demetrios the son of Glaukos in the late IInd or early Ist c. (and thus considerably later than our moldmade bowl); see E. Thomas, “ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΣ ΓΛΑΥΚΟΥ ΜΙΛΗΣΙΟΣ: Bemerkungen zur Person und zum Werk eines späthellenistischen Bildhauers”, MDAI(I) 33 (1983) 124‑133.

42 B. V. Head, Historia Numorum (1911), p. 333, fig. 188; SNG Danish National Museum, Epirus-Acarnania, pl. 9, 419, 420.

43 J. Marcadé, Au musée de Délos: Étude sur la sculpture hellénistique en ronde bosse découverte dans l’île (1969), p. 184‑187, pl. XXX (with images of the Milesian and Akarnanian coins). Apollo sits in the same position, but on a rocky seat, on a late Hellenistic sealing from the Maison des sceaux (F.‑M. Boussac, Les sceaux de Délos I [1982], p. 45‑46, no Απ 150, pl. 10).

44 The position of Artemis, though reversed, is also found on a Delian seal (F.‑M. Boussac, Les sceaux de Délos I [1982], p. 131, no Αρ 15, pl. 46).

45 See, for instance, the Delphic tripod on coins of Croton, C. M. Kraay, M. Hirmer, Greek Coins (1966), p. 310‑311, pls. 92, 93.

46 Agora XXII, p. 72‑73, no 231, pl. 45 (view A), and P 31700 (unpublished). The bow and quiver are absent, the legs are in the same position as on the Milesian coins and relief, but the bench on which he sits appears to have an animal foot.

47 Athens NM 2099 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 6:1; Benndorf 1869-1883, pl. 59:3).

48 Athens NM 2123 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 2:1), 2125. See also Mainz 3070 (T. Kraus, Megarische Becher im römisch-germanischen Zentralmuseum zu Mainz [1951], p. 6‑7, no 4, pl. 2:1, fig. 1:4) and Musée Scheurleer 1882 (CVA Musée Scheurleer 1 [Netherlands 1], III N pl. 2 [40]:1).

49 Most closely similar to London BM 1878, 1019.363 (S. Weston, [n. 31], p. 113‑114, pl. 10), but the same medallion probably occurs on a bowl in Zurich (CVA Zurich [Switzerland 2], pl. 26 [68]:12, Beilage 8:2) and, in finer form, on two bowls in Athens (NM 17928 [Hausmann 1959, pl. 6:2]; NM 2581 [Benndorf 1869‑1893, pl. 59:2c]). The fat cheeks, staring eyes within almond-shaped orbs, and shaggy hair are characteristic.

50 Although poorly impressed, they resemble the leaves in the calyx of Athens NM 2099 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 6:1), a small acanthus with vertical veining at base and a pointed tip.

51 G. R. Edwards, Corinthian Hellenistic Pottery, Corinth VII.iii (1975), p. 168, no 800, pl. 67.

52 Kassel private collection, Athens NM 2348, 2349, and 2119 (Hausmann 1959, nos 1, 21‑23, pls. 8, 9; Schwabacher 1941, p. 186, no 12, pls. I A 1, II A 1). Karlsruhe Landesmuseum B 2686 (Hausmann 1959, pl. 3, but omitted from Hausmann’s list) also falls into this subgroup.

53 The only certain instances of shared stamps that I have encountered are on Athens NM 2582 (Benndorf 1869‑1883, pl. 60:1) and Megara Archaeological Museum A 221 (LIMC VIII.1, p. 105; VIII.2, pl. 58, Tritones 105), which combine typical figures of the core series with a boukranion/rosette as upper rim pattern.

54 Athens NM 2348, 2349, 2119 (Hausmann 1959, pls. 8:2, 9:1, 2).

55 Karlsruhe Landesmuseum B 2686 (CVA Karlsruhe 1 [Germany 7], pl. 31 [329]:10; Hausmann 1959, pl. 3).

56 Schwabacher 1941, p. 186, pl. II A 1.

57 Schwabacher 1941, p. 191‑193; G. Siebert, Recherches sur les ateliers de bols à reliefs du Péloponnèse à l’époque hellénistique, BEFAR 233 (1978), p. 243‑244.

58 Agora XXII, p. 28.

59 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 56, nos 103‑105, pls. 18, 75.

60 Agora XXII, p. 47, no 20, pls. 4, 98; the same boukranion forms the basis of the attribution of fragment 2 to Bion’s Workshop.

61 Very few of these rim stamps are well preserved; the best published images are Hausmann 1959, pls. 8:2, 9:1.

62 For good photographs of the motif within the core series of Hausmann’s Workshop, see Hausmann 1959, pl. 5:2; Rogl 2004-2005, figs. 4, 5; CVA Frankfurt am Main 4 [Germany 66], pl. 23 [3268]:1, 2. The rosettes that Rogl cites as comparanda, though very similar, are not identical, for they lack the central convex button of the Hausmann stamp (see Agora XXII, p. 62, 74, nos 154, 240, pls. 28, 46, 78, the first signed by Bion).

63 Courby 1922, p. 338; Hausmann 1959, p. 27.

64 For the chronology of the introduction of figured bowls (which occur as early as any in archaeological deposits), see S. I. Rotroff, “The Introduction of the Moldmade Bowl Revisited: Tracking a Hellenistic Innovation”, Hesperia 75 (2006), p. 357‑378.

65 The date was based on a fragment found at the Athenian Agora and attributed by Hausmann to the group (Hausmann 1959, p. 27, 108, n. 107, no 17 = Thompson 1934, p. 364‑365, no C 43, fig. 49). It comes from Thompson’s Group C, which Thompson dated to the early IInd c. (ibid., p. 347). Close examination shows, however, that the fragment does not belong to Hausmann’s Workshop (the figures are much smaller and the rim pattern different), but rather to the M Monogram Class; furthermore, Group C is now thought to have been deposited in the second quarter of the IInd c. (Agora XXII, p. 109; Agora XXXIII, p. 358).

66 Agora XXII, p. 65‑66, n181, pl. 33 from deposit C 20:2.

67 Agora XXII, p. 66, no 182, pl. 33, from the Middle Stoa building fill; for the revised date of the deposit, see Agora XXXIII, p. 362, under H‑K 12‑14.

68 On a bowl in Athens (NM 2099), antithetical figures of an archaistic Athena Promachos flank and guard the tripod (Hausmann 1959, pl. 6:1); for full argumentation, see S. I. Rotroff, “Hausmann’s Workshop and Innovation in the Production of Athenian Moldmade Bowls”, in S. Japp, P. Kögler (eds), Traditions and Innovations: Tracing the Development of Pottery from the Late Classical to the Early Imperial Periods (2016), p. 297‑305.

69 Schwabacher 1941, p. 197, pl. I B 9 (Kerameikos); Courby 1922, p. 357 refers to a bowl that he saw at Eleusis, made in the same mold as a bowl in Berlin (Berlin F 2887, A. Furtwängler, Die Sammlung Sabouroff: Kunstdenkmäler aus Griechenland [1883‑1887], pl. 73:3).

70 H. B. Walters, Catalogue of the Greek and Etruscan Vases in the British Museum IV, Vases of the Latest Period (1896), p. 252, no G98; Karlsruhe Landesmuseum B 1535 and B 2686 (CVA Karlsruhe 1 [Germany 7], p. 38‑39, pl. 31 [329]:9, 10); Copenhagen NM 3832 (CVA Copenhagen 4 [Denmark 4], p. 140, pl. 180 [183]:2).

71 The only published example among these is Megara Archaeological Museum A 221 (LIMC VIII.1, p. 105; VIII.2, pl. 58, Tritones 105), but I have seen three more from graves there, which are frequently furnished with moldmade bowls. I have also observed seven fragments from Hausmann’s Workshop in the museum storerooms at Corinth and four on Aigina.

72 Benndorf (1869‑1883, p. 117) gave Megara as the purported provenience of all of the Hausmann bowls that he published, reporting that this source was repeatedly and firmly reiterated for similar bowls that he encountered in private collections and on the market in Athens. More recent finds in graves there lend weight to that claim.

73 A. Furtwängler 1883‑1887 (n. 69), p. 799‑801, nos 2887‑2890; CVA Musée Scheurleer 1 [Netherlands 1], III N pl. 2 [40]:1.

74 Agora XXII, p. 30.

75 Agora XXII, p. 29.

76 Agora XXII, p. 37.

77 Agora XXII, p. 84‑85, nos 338 and 341, pls. 61, 87 lack the scraped groove, but it occurs on nos 339 and 340.

78 Schwabacher 1941, p. 218, no 1, pl. VII A 11; Edwards 1956, p. 106, no 109, pl. 49.

79 I know of only one example of this detail in another industry (C. Domăneanţu, Les bols hellénistiques à décor en relief, Histria XI [2000], p. 103, no 518, pl. 34).

80 Agora XXII, p. 48, 85, nos 35, 341, pls. 6, 61, 87.

81 P 37034 (unpublished).

82 For pale Attic fabric, see Agora XXIX, p. 10; for a moldmade bowl in this fabric, see Agora XXII, p. 71‑72, no 224, pl. 44.

83 Thompson 1934, p. 383, nD 41, fig. 72.

84 Thompson 1934, p. 406, no E 78, fig. 95b.

85 Agora XXII, p. 84‑85, nos 335, 338 pls. 60, 61 (signed fragments found in Sullan destruction debris), and no 341, pl. 61 (a nearly complete unsigned bowl in the footing trench of the Metroon, which was probably built in the last decades of the IInd c.). For the latter, see H. A. Thompson, “Buildings on the West Side of the Agora”, Hesperia 6 (1937), p. 194‑195, fig. 199 and S. I. Rotroff, “Material Culture”, in G. R. Bugh (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Hellenistic World (2006), p. 140, fig. 2.

86 For a current assessment of the date Thompson’s Group D, see Agora XXXIII, p. 361, under H 16:4.

87 Agora XXII, p. 52, no 67, pl. 12; Metzger 1971, p. 70, no 129, pl. 17; I. R. Metzger, “Dioskurenbecher”, AD 26, A’ (1971), p. 95‑103, pl. 20.

88 For the type, see U. Sinn, Die homerischen Becher: hellenistischen Reliefkeramik aus Makedonien (1979).

89 For the earliest floral bowls, mechanical copies of metal bowls, see S. IRotroff, “Silver, Glass, and Clay: Evidence for the Dating of Hellenistic Luxury Tableware”, Hesperia 51 (1982) p. 329‑337; ead. (n. 64), p. 368‑372, figs. 6‑8.

90 S. IRotroff (n. 28), p. 87‑93; ead., “The Date of the Long‑petal Bowl: A Review of the Contextual Evidence”, in ΖΕπιστηµονικ συνάντηση για την ελληνιστικ κεραµική, Αίγιο 4‑9 Απριλίου 2005, Πρακτικά (2011), p. 635‑644.

91 Agora XXII, p. 93, no 409, pls. 69, 91.

92 This can also be observed in material from the Athenian Agora. For example, among fragments of long‑petal bowls in the well‑dated Sullan deposit F 13:3, the scraped groove is absent from three of 16 rims and from five of 14 medallions.

93 Courby 1922, p. 327, pl. IX:d; P. Hatzidakis, “Κτίριο νότια του ‘Ιερού του Προµαχώνος’: Μία taberna vinaria στη Δήλο”, in Δ’ Επιστηµονική συνάντηση για την ελληνιστική κεραµική: Χρονολογικά προβλήµατα, κλειστά σύνολα – εργαστήρια, Πρακτικά (1997), p. 302, pl. 223:α, B.5906.

94 S. I. Rotroff, “Date of the Long‑petal Bowl” (n. 90), p. 640‑641.

95 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 83, nos 321, 328, pls. 58, 59.

96 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 85, no 347, pl. 63.

97 E.g., Agora XXII, p. 86, no 349, pl. 63; Edwards 1956, p.105, no 104, pls. 49, 51.

98 Agora XXII, p. 69, no 207, pls. 40, 81.

99 Courby 1922, p. 364‑366, pl. IX:e, f; c. Watzinger, “Vasenfunde aus Athen”, MDAI(A) 26 (1901), p. 69‑70, no 5; Agora XXII, p. 40.

100 R. H. Howland, Greek Lamps and Their Survivals, The Athenian Agora IV (1958), p. 176‑177, lamps of type 51 B. For lamps of Ariston on Delos, see Bruneau, EAD XXVI (n. 4), p. 43‑50.

101 E. g., Agora XXII, p. 87, 92, 93, nos 359, 360, 362, 403, 410, pls. 64, 65, 69, 96, 97, all probably imports to Athens.

102 G. Siebert (n. 57), p. 295, no A.121, pl. 10 (Argos), p. 381, no Go.3, pl. 49 (Gortys).

103 Agora XXII, p. 38‑39.

104 E.g., Thompson 1934, p. 381‑383, no D 38, figs. 69a, 69b.

105 Agora XXIX, p. 108‑109.

106 Agora XXII, p. 39.

107 From the published photograph, it appears that string marks also occur on a bowl of Hausmann’s Workshop in Frankfurt (CVA Frankfurt am Main 4 [Germany 66], pl. 23 [3268]:2). Personal observation of bowls at the National Museum in Athens reveals more examples, on NM 2128, 2349, and perhaps 2348.

108 At the Agora I have found traces on bowls of the Workshop of Bion (Agora XXII, p. 56, no 101, pl. 75 and P 20265 [unpublished]), the M Monogram Class (ibid., p. 57, no 110, pl. 19), an unattributed bowl (P 9668 [unpublished]), and possibly on a long‑petal bowl (ibid., p. 84, no 336, pl. 61).

109 Four examples in the National Museum at Athens have clear dipping marks inside and outside: Athens NM 2120, 2345, 2346, 2583 (Hausmann 1959, pls. 4:1, 7:1, 2:2; Benndorf pl. 60:1); another has a line only on the inside (Athens NM 2123, Hausmann, pl. 2:1). P. Hellström has also called attention to this feature (Pottery of Classical and Later Date, Terracotta Lamps and Glass, Labraunda II.i [1965], p. 20, n. 6). For possible other instances, see S. I. Rotroff, “A New Moldmade Bowl from Athens”, in Studies in Ancient Art and Civilization 17 (2013), p. 154.

110 Courby 1922, p. 392‑393.

111 BCH 81 (1957), p. 710‑711.

112 EAD XXXI, p. 1‑4, 314.

113 P. Hatzidakis (n. 93), p. 302. For archaeological evidence for workshops on Delos, see M. Brunet, “L’artisanat dans la Délos hellénistique: essai de bilan archéologique”, Topoi 8 (1998), p. 681‑691 and P. Karvonis, “Les installations commerciales dans la ville de Délos à l’époque hellénistique”, BCH 132 (2008), 173 (two coroplasts’ workshops, one with the apparent remains of a kiln).

114 R. Etienne, J.‑P. Braun, Ténos I, Le sanctuaire de Poseidon et d’Amphitrite (1986), p. 224, no An. 9, pl. 111 (not from Hausmann’s Workshop, as is asserted there).

115 Rotroff 2013, p. 8‑10.

116 S. I. Rotroff (n. 64), p. 363‑367.

117 Agora XXII, p. 49, 78, nos 40, 275, pls. 7, 54 from deposit M 21:1 (p. 103).

118 Especially the building fill of the Middle Stoa (H‑K 12‑14), the fill over the Square Peristyle (Q 8‑9), and the fillings of cisterns P 21:4, M 21:1 and N21:4, the latter two with debris from the Workshop of Bion. For the revised dating, see the deposit summaries in Agora XXXIII, p. 362, 365‑366, 369, 371‑372.

119 As Gros (2013, p. 149) has also pointed out. It would be interesting to widen the inquiry to other Athenian ceramic products, although such a project would be hampered by the difficulty of recognizing plain Attic black‑gloss macroscopically.

120 S. I. Rotroff, “The Pottery from the Agora Bone Well”, in ΗΕπιστηµονική συνάντηση για την ελληνιστική κεραµική, Ιωάννινα, 5‑9 Μαίου, 2009, Πρακτικά (2014), p. 522‑524.

121 For a summary of the shift in the amphora chronology in this period, see G. Finkielsztejn, Chronologie détaillée et révisée des éponymes amphoriques rhodiens, de 270 à 108 av. J.‑C. environ: Premier bilan, BAR International Series 990 (2001), p. 192, Table 19.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 — Workshop of  Bion, imbricate bowls (1, 2) and figured bowl (3).
Légende Scale 2/3. 
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 343k
Titre Fig. 2 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (4–6).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 284k
Titre Fig. 3 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (7–10).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 330k
Titre Fig. 4 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (11–15).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [15], S. Rotroff [13].
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 288k
Titre Fig. 5 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (16, 17).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. S. Rotroff; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 241k
Titre Fig. 6 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (18–20).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-6.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 454k
Titre Fig. 7 — Workshop of Bion, figured bowls (21–27).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-7.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 423k
Titre Fig. 8 — Workshop of  Bion, bowls with gorgoneion medallion (28–31).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-8.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 516k
Titre Fig. 9 — Workshop of Bion, rosette medallions (32–34) and rim fragments (35–38).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [38], S. Rotroff [32].
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-9.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 376k
Titre Fig. 10 — Workshop A, imbricate bowls (39, 40).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-10.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 321k
Titre Fig. 11 — Workshop A, imbricate bowls (4145).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-11.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 340k
Titre Fig. 12 — Workshop A, figured bowls (4653).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-12.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 392k
Titre Fig. 13 — Workshop A, figured bowls (5458).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-13.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 733k
Titre Fig. 14Workshop A, rims (59, 60) and long-petal bowl (61).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-14.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 224k
Titre Fig. 15 — Workshop A, long-petal bowls (6265).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-15.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 425k
Titre Fig. 16 — Workshop A, long-petal bowls (66, 67).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-16.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 427k
Titre Fig. 17 — Hausmann’s Workshop (68, 69).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-17.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 331k
Titre Fig. 18 — Hausmann’s Workshop (7072).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-18.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 313k
Titre Fig. 19 — Hausmann’s Workshop (73, 74).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-19.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 437k
Titre Fig. 20 — Hausmann’s Workshop (7579).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-20.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 529k
Titre Fig. 21 — Class 1 (80) and M Monogram Class (8183).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-21.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 183k
Titre Fig. 22 — M Monogram Class (8486).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-22.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 378k
Titre Fig. 23 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (8792).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [87], S. Rotroff [89].
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-23.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 348k
Titre Fig. 24 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (9395).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-24.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 323k
Titre Fig. 25 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (9699).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-25.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 548k
Titre Fig. 26 — Workshop of Apollodoros, long-petal bowls (100, 101) and concentric-semicircle bowl (102).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-26.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 314k
Titre Fig. 27 — Pine-cone (103, 104) and imbricate bowls (105110).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-27.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 488k
Titre Fig. 28 — Imbricate bowls (111116).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-28.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 426k
Titre Fig. 29 — Imbricate bowl (117).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits (Drawing A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-29.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 175k
Titre Fig. 30 — Floral bowls (118, 119).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [119].
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-30.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 333k
Titre Fig. 31 — Floral (120122) and figured bowls (123125).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [125], S. Rotroff [122].
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-31.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 396k
Titre Fig. 32 — Figured bowl (126).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Drawing A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-32.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 142k
Titre Fig. 33 — Figured bowls (127132).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-33.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 367k
Titre Fig. 34 — Figured bowls (133137) and medallion (138).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-34.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 556k
Titre Fig. 35 — Rim and wall fragments (139146).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-35.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 427k
Titre Fig. 36 — Mold for long-petal bowl (147), jeweled long-petal bowls (148, 149).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross [149], S. Rotroff [147].
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-36.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 482k
Titre Fig. 37 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (150153).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-37.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 462k
Titre Fig. 38 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (154157).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-38.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 394k
Titre Fig. 39 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (158163).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-39.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 720k
Titre Fig. 40 — Jeweled long-petal bowls (164169).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-40.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 708k
Titre Fig. 41 — Jeweled long-petal bowls with swirling petals (170175).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; ph. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-41.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 387k
Titre Fig. 42 — Plain long-petal bowls (176–183).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-42.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 505k
Titre Fig. 43 — Plain long-petal bowls (184187).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-43.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 617k
Titre Fig. 44 — Plain long-petal bowls (188–191).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, V. Tsiairis.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-44.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 447k
Titre Fig. 45 — Plain long-petal bowls (192195).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-45.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 751k
Titre Fig. 46 — Plain long-petal bowls (196–201).
Légende Scale 2/3.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-46.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 660k
Titre Fig. 47 — Plain long-petal bowls (202–204).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton; dr. A. Hooton, inked by T. Ross.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-47.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 362k
Titre Fig. 48Concentric-semicircle bowl (205).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-48.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 270k
Titre Fig. 49 — Concentric-semicircle (206-208) and network bowls (209, 211).
Légende Scale 2/3.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis; dr. A. Hooton, inked by S. Rotroff.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-49.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 540k
Titre Fig. 50 — Network bowl (210).
Légende Scale 1/2.
Crédits Dr. A. Hooton.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-50.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 493k
Titre Fig. 51String marks on the bottoms of Athenian bowls on Delos, at left (74, 75, 199) and at the Athenian Agora, at right (inv. nos P 18670, P 22191 [Agora XXII, nos. 101, 110], P 9668).
Légende Scale 1/1.
Crédits Ph. R. Lamberton, S. Rotroff, V. Tsiairis.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/bch/docannexe/image/648/img-51.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 798k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Susan I. Rotroff, « Athenian Moldmade Bowls on Delos: Laumonier’s Sample », Bulletin de correspondance hellénique, 142.2 | 2018, 567-692.

Référence électronique

Susan I. Rotroff, « Athenian Moldmade Bowls on Delos: Laumonier’s Sample », Bulletin de correspondance hellénique [En ligne], 142.2 | 2018, mis en ligne le 01 décembre 2019, consulté le 28 janvier 2020. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/bch/648 ; DOI : 10.4000/bch.648

Haut de page

Auteur

Susan I. Rotroff

Jarvis Thurston and Mona Van Duyn Professor emerîta, Washington University in Saint Louis.

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

Bulletin de correspondance hellénique

Haut de page
  • Logo École française d’Athènes
  • Logo Ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la recherche et de l’innovation
  • OpenEdition Journals