Skip to navigation – Site map
Special feature

Relocating the Functions of Chineseness in Chinese Popular Music after the China Wind

Chen-yu Lin
p. 7-14

Abstract

While the popularity of China Wind (zhongguofeng 中國風) music during the 2000s has waned somewhat since its peak, the notion of Chineseness in popular music requires reconfiguration. In the world of popular music, transnational flows of culture, migration, and capital have created various forms of Chineseness with different functions. This article examines two ways in which the perception of Chineseness functions in the music industry, namely as a re-centred Chineseness in the creative industries, and Chineseness as a globalising project, by examining the internationally franchised televised music contest The Voice of China and the recent work of two artists known for their China Wind songs, Jay Chou and Wang Leehom. Through textual analysis of media content and songs, as well interviews with industry practitioners, this article argues that Chineseness in today’s Chinese popular music is often shaped by markets, industrial practices, media censorship, state policy, and cross-industry convergence, and musicians’ artistry increasingly plays a part in forming and authorising the representation of Chineseness in contemporary Chinese popular music.

Top of page

Excerpt

Full text document will be published online on June 2021.

Top of page

References

Bibliographical reference

Chen-yu Lin, « Relocating the Functions of Chineseness in Chinese Popular Music after the China Wind », China Perspectives, 2020-2 | 2020, 7-14.

Electronic reference

Chen-yu Lin, « Relocating the Functions of Chineseness in Chinese Popular Music after the China Wind », China Perspectives [Online], 2020-2 | 2020, Online since 01 June 2021, connection on 10 August 2020. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/chinaperspectives/10068 ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/chinaperspectives.10068

Top of page

About the author

Chen-yu Lin

Dr. Chen-Yu Lin is Research Fellow at the Institute of Popular Music (IPM), Department of Music, University of Liverpool, and Assistant Professor at Department of International Business, National Taiwan University. Her research interests include Mandarin popular music and music censorship. She is also a documentary producer who actively incorporates filmmaking and screening as research methods. Her films have been shortlisted for AHRC Research in Film Awards twice. No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei City 106, Taiwan (R.O.C.).cylin@liv.ac.uk

Top of page

Copyright

© All rights reserved

Top of page
  • Logo CEFC – Centre d’études français sur la Chine contemporaine
  • OpenEdition Journals