Skip to navigation – Site map
Special feature

The Housing Boom and the Rise of Localism in Hong Kong: Evidence from the Legislative Council Election in 2016

Stan Hok-Wui Wong and Kin Man Wan
p. 31-40

Abstract

Localist parties have become an emerging force in Hong Kong’s political landscape. What has caused the rise of localism in the city? Extant studies focus on cultural and social factors. In this article, we propose a political economy explanation: global and regional economic factors have caused a housing boom in Hong Kong since the mid-2000s and produced impactful redistributive consequences. While homeowners benefit tremendously from the hike in asset prices, non-homeowners stand to lose. Their divergent economic interests then translate into political preferences; homeowners support political parties that favour the status quo, while non-homeowners tend to support those that challenge it. Using a newly available public opinion survey, we find preliminary evidence in support of our argument. In particular, homeowners are less likely to identify with localist parties and tend to vote for pro-establishment ones. High-income earners, however, are more likely to vote for localist parties.

Top of page

Excerpt

Full text document will be published online on September 2019.

Top of page

References

Bibliographical reference

Stan Hok-Wui Wong and Kin Man Wan, « The Housing Boom and the Rise of Localism in Hong Kong: Evidence from the Legislative Council Election in 2016 », China Perspectives, 2018/3 | 2018, 31-40.

Electronic reference

Stan Hok-Wui Wong and Kin Man Wan, « The Housing Boom and the Rise of Localism in Hong Kong: Evidence from the Legislative Council Election in 2016 », China Perspectives [Online], 2018/3 | 2018, Online since 01 September 2019, connection on 23 January 2019. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/chinaperspectives/8070

Top of page

About the authors

Stan Hok-Wui Wong

Stan Hok-Wui Wong is Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Social Sciences of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University.HJ402, Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (shw.wong@polyu.edu.hk).

Kin Man Wan

Kin Man Wan is a PhD student in the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.Third Floor, T.C. Cheng Building, United College, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (kmwan@link.cuhk.edu.hk).

Top of page

Copyright

© All rights reserved

Top of page
  • Logo CEFC – Centre d’études français sur la Chine contemporaine
  • OpenEdition Journals