Navegación – Mapa del sitio

InicioVida científicaEditorialesOpen science and translation

Open science and translation

Christine Kosmopoulos
Traducción de Alvin Harberts
Este artículo es una traducción de:
Science ouverte et traduction
Otras traducciones del artículo
Ciencia abierta y traducción
开放科学与翻译
Open Science και μετάφραση

Texto completo

1Cybergeo has been mobilized since its creation in 1996 in the worldwide Open Science movement, which did not yet bear its name. The journal has worked continuously for internationalization, through its expert committees, the publication in all European languages and the choice of an interoperable technology that facilitates dissemination in the world's scientific search engines. It also uses open-access applications that it has developed in partnership with OpenEdition, with Lodel for the publication part and with the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) in Canada, with OJS for the submission part.

  • 1 Kosmopoulos C., "L'accès ouvert, un espoir qui donne le vertige…" Cybergeo Conversation, 15/04/2019 (...)

2The Geopenmod (2014) and Data Papers (2017) sections are part of this anchoring of the journal in this humanistic project, while meeting the requirements of reproducibility of scientific advances. The recent orientations issued by the European Union (Horizon 2020) and France in the National Plan for Open Science in 2018 are based on the pioneering achievements in open access, of which Cybergeo is a part. Indeed, Cybergeo proves that Open Science is possible and viable, despite the attempts of opportunistic and highly lucrative activities that are taking hold of this new model1. The authentic open access that we defend must be without cost to the reader, without cost to the author.

  • 2 Cybergeo participants : Natacha Aveline, Colette Cauvin, Alvin Harberts, Denise Pumain, Liubing Xie
  • 3 "Ministère de l'enseignement supérieur, de la recherche et de l'innovation" in France.

3For more than twenty years Cybergeo has been able to meet the challenges of anticipation through conviction in its editorial model and through the involvement of the members of the journal's committees to defend it. It is on the strength of this collective dynamic that we wanted to deepen the space of scientific translations in 2020. The CybergeoNet project was launched to develop and share with other open access journals, with small budgets, a low-cost, innovative and efficient translation method. Several members and translators of Cybergeo, as well as two journals (Via Tourism and Brussels Studies), an encyclopedia (Hypergeo) and institutional partners2 have joined forces to respond to the call for projects launched by the Monitoring Committee on Scientific Publishing in the Social Sciences and Humanities (MESRI3).

4This collaboration has made it possible to share the difficulties of translations between French, English, Spanish and Chinese. Machine translation tools were tested. We have developed a guide of best practices for writing and translation for the editorial teams and authors of all journals who wish to use them. Several multilingual indexes have been built to accompany the editorial protocol. Translation costs, which are too expensive for journals like ours, can be reduced thanks to these shared skills.

5The success of Open Science will depend on our ability to write, publish and distribute in multiple languages. More than ever, therefore, we need to innovate and share. We can be pleased that last month the National Committee for Open Science in France took up this issue by creating a working group whose objectives are in total agreement with those of CybergeoNet!

Inicio de página

Notas

1 Kosmopoulos C., "L'accès ouvert, un espoir qui donne le vertige…" Cybergeo Conversation, 15/04/2019 : https://cybergeo.hypotheses.org/462

2 Cybergeo participants : Natacha Aveline, Colette Cauvin, Alvin Harberts, Denise Pumain, Liubing Xie.

Institutional partners: University of Paris 1 Sorbonne (Maria Gravari-Barbas), University of Santiago (Francisco Maturana), University of Rouen (Bernard Elissalde), University of Mendoza (Gloria Zamorano), Université libre de Bruxelles (Benjamin Wayens), Université Saint-Louis - Bruxelles (Margaux Hardy), International Geographic Union (Nathalie Lemarchand).

Participating journals : Brussels Studies, Via.Tourism Review, Hypergeo.

3 "Ministère de l'enseignement supérieur, de la recherche et de l'innovation" in France.

Inicio de página

Para citar este artículo

Referencia electrónica

Christine Kosmopoulos, « Open science and translation », Cybergeo : European Journal of Geography [En línea], Editoriales, Publicado el 24 noviembre 2020, consultado el 24 febrero 2021. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/cybergeo/35772

Inicio de página

Autor

Christine Kosmopoulos

Research Engineer
CNRS-UMR 8504 Géographie-cités, Paris, France
cybergeo@parisgeo.cnrs.fr

Artículos del mismo autor

Inicio de página

Derechos de autor

Licence Creative Commons
La revue Cybergeo est mise à disposition selon les termes de la Licence Creative Commons Attribution - Pas d'Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 3.0 non transposé.

Inicio de página
Buscar en OpenEdition Search

Se le redirigirá a OpenEdition Search