Navigation – Plan du site

AccueilIssues58EditorialEditorial

Editorial

Editorial

Tristan Bruslé, Stéphane Gros et Philippe Ramirez

Texte intégral

1Issue 58 of the European Bulletin of Himalayan Research marks the completion of the journal’s transition from a printed journal to an online open-access journal, now referenced on DOAJ. The OpenEdition platform, one of Europe’s largest open-access publishing initiatives will host us for the years to come. This will no doubt improve our visibility and readership, while providing an ideal publishing environment for the EBHR with improved referencing and indexing and by systematically assigning a DOI to every article.

2As we achieve this transition to online publication and renew our commitment to open-access, we also recognise the ongoing challenges it poses as an economic model. As we join OpenEdition, which has played a leading role in the development of open scholarly communication in the social sciences and humanities, we invite readers to consider the recent Action Plan for Diamond Open Access to support the development of non-commercial or community-driven forms of open-access publishing.

3We are extremely grateful to the team at PREO (Université de Bourgogne) that supported us in a smooth transition to the digital world. Their continuous encouragement and help has proven decisive in the process. In terms of readership, online access to the EBHR has already proved a success: since the launch of the website last October, the monthly average shows that there are more than five hundred visitors.

4We are particularly pleased to celebrate these achievements with the publication of this special issue edited by Erik de Maaker and Dan Smyer Yü, which broadens the geographical scope of the EBHR, taking us from the western Himalayas to Yunnan in Southwest China. The overall topic of this collection, which comprises an introduction and four articles, is ‘Storying multi-species relationships, commoning and the state in the Himalayas’. Erik de Maaker’s introduction provides a comprehensive overview of changing Himalayan contexts of multispecies relationships in daily life. Tara Bate takes us to Humla (Nepal) where a project to set up a conservation area threatens to jeopardise the relationship Limi Valley inhabitants have nurtured with their environment through pastoral practices. Zhen Ma considers that, for the Dai people from Yunnan, water is a relational being, nowadays thrown into confusion by new development-led irrigation schemes. Also set in Yunnan, Rui Sun’s article describes ‘cross-species love’ between flower growers and roses, taking the metaphor as far as comparing it with the relationships between mother and son. The last article of the special issue, by Sangay Tamang, presents a colonial history of ‘environmentalism of the hills’ that created a rift between the local population and their environment.

5In their commentary article, Radha Adhikari and Jeevan R Sharma show a keen interest in the way gender dynamics are depicted in Nepal in a context of a rapid transformation of society. We hope our readers will appreciate their stance. We take this opportunity to remind you that we are always open to comments on past publications. Alex Michaels does just that by responding to Gérard Toffin’s article in the previous issue, debating the links between classical Indology and ethnology in South Asia.

6This issue also offers our readers a translation of an article by Samten Karmay and Philippe Sagant on interrelated notions of rank, honour and power among the Sharwa of Amdo, with an introduction by Katia Buffetrille. Finally, we have put together a collection of five book reviews on migration, kinship, education, development and the environment in Nepal and the Himalayas.

7With the EBHR now providing state-of-the-art online publishing features and more opportunities for a new form of research dissemination, now is the time to send us your proposals and encourage your colleagues to do the same. We certainly continue to strive to serve the community of fellow Himalayanists and to make the EBHR a dynamic arena for academic exchange and cross-fertilisation.

8Enjoy your read!

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence électronique

Tristan Bruslé, Stéphane Gros et Philippe Ramirez, « Editorial »European Bulletin of Himalayan Research [En ligne], 58 | 2022, mis en ligne le 15 juillet 2022, consulté le 26 mai 2024. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/ebhr/580 ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/ebhr.580

Haut de page

Auteurs

Tristan Bruslé

Editor, European Bulletin of Himalayan Research

Articles du même auteur

Stéphane Gros

Editor, European Bulletin of Himalayan Research

Articles du même auteur

Philippe Ramirez

Editor, European Bulletin of Himalayan Research

Articles du même auteur

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

CC-BY-4.0

Le texte seul est utilisable sous licence CC BY 4.0. Les autres éléments (illustrations, fichiers annexes importés) sont « Tous droits réservés », sauf mention contraire.

Haut de page
Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search