Navigation – Plan du site

AccueilNuméros20.11. Creative WritingVI. Creative piecesMother Tongue: language variations

1. Creative Writing
VI. Creative pieces

Mother Tongue: language variations

Sara GREAVES

Texte intégral

  • 1 Sara Greaves and Monique De Mattia-Viviès, Language Learning and the Mother Tongue: Multidisciplina (...)
  • 2 A notion introduced in my book (a critical study and a bilingual edition) Côté guerre côté jardin : (...)

1The following poems can be read in connection with the research on the many-faceted subject of the mother tongue, especially as it helps or hinders second language learners, that I have conducted with Monique De Mattia-Viviès over the past few years. The first poem has to do with transmission, and with children who find themselves the champions of other people’s causes – causes which were themselves perhaps transmitted. Speech disorder is seen as a kind of symptom. The poem can also be seen in the light of what Monique De Mattia-Viviès describes as “language variations within the family”1, in this case “intralingual variations”, where the parents speak the same language but in contrasting ways. The second two poems also engage with intralingual variations, this time from the point of view of the exile whose language evolves without them in another country, or who feels their mother tongue unravelling. In the fourth poem language aspires to the sensuality and sensitivity of skin, to lalangue, and the final poem recalls the notions of the “plurilingual skin-voice”2 and the “bilingual overlap”, two notions I have developed in my research. The voice moves between languages, suggesting the fluidity of a plural identity and perhaps the role of exophonic writing as a refuge from intimacy.

  • 3 « Entrer dans la langue ou dans les langues : de la langue maternelle à la langue mat-rangère », E- (...)

2Ces poèmes peuvent se lire en lien avec la recherche sur le sujet multidimensionnel qu’est la langue maternelle, notamment en ce qu’elle facilite ou freine l’apprentissage d’une langue seconde, que j’ai menée avec Monique De Mattia-Viviès depuis quelques années. Avec le premier poème il est question de transmission, et d’enfants qui se retrouvent être les avocats des causes des autres – des causes elles-mêmes transmises, peut-être. Le trouble du langage évoqué ici est présenté comme une sorte de symptôme. On peut également éclairer ce texte à la lumière de ce que Monique De Mattia-Viviès appelle les « variations linguistiques au sein de la famille »3, dans ce cas des « variations intra-linguales », où les parents parlent la même langue mais de manière contrastée. Les deuxième et troisième poèmes rappellent aussi cette notion de variations intra-linguales, cette fois-ci du point de vue de l’exilé.e dont la langue évolue sans lui ou elle dans un autre pays ou qui sent sa langue maternelle s’effilocher. Dans le quatrième poème la langue aspire à la sensualité et la sensibilité de la peau, à lalangue, et le dernier rappelle les notions de “Voix-peau plurilingue » et de « chevauchement bilingue » que j’ai développées dans mes travaux de recherche : la voix passe entre les langues, suggérant la fluidité d’une identité plurielle et, peut-être, le rôle de l’écriture exophonique en offrant un refuge à l’intime.

3Tongue-tied

4Tie a knot in your handkerchief
a keepsake of unrecalled
sweepstakes not yours
to win or lose...

Bear lifelong witness like Moses
to a scalding hot coal,
to your light too bright
for day, snuffed out
by a matronly scold.

Daughter of silence
you hand down the lore
more surely than any
self-proclaiming guru.

Your Aaron is a sharp glance,
your rod a silent eloquence
more efficacious than any miracle.

Night after wide-eyed night
of burning immolation,
acid etched onto copper
plates for tables of the law.

Which, perhaps, you would feign
have hammered: what is a stammer
but a stall in the flow – inarticulate
retch of rebellion?

Uneasy I wait as you stumble along
your syntactical obstacle race
and politely applaud.

5Conference

6Just as words that ring
with class-bound vowels
prick the skin-voice,
so here words trip
and traipse – spot-on smug
decorous diplomats
minding the seating

Words like facilitate
Enabling, competencies
-
so many pecunious pieties -
riverrun prissily
flash legitimacy
to a polyglot audience
grateful for globish

Such words refine
to bland, ethics-wieldy
(I find your maternity
metaphor distasteful
and what’s more gendered
)
handy with pathos,
design and describe
the new general

But to the visiting exile
these words sting
a reminder the river has
run
shady rivers
woodland bluebells
sunspotted pools

7Language in exile

8The Seine is rising the forecast warns,
the Marne, the Meuse…

Speeding northwards my eyes
wander a watery
landscape of flooded gardens
greenhouse panes crosshatched
with silver strokes and
pale rainbow, windbreaks
of cypress and poplar
waterlogged orchards in rows
like wading oysterers.

France is afloat – though
not at sea like old Blighty,
Europe’s maverick menacing
shipwreck. Rallying Paris
I’m off to gorge on old
language with other exiles
poetry-raiders all dangling
their language by the ear
like a lost child’s teddy.

Partners in crime – on parole
in fluent French with English
a moth(er)-eaten paisley
shawl of guilt-furled tongues.
We are like stammerers
Skirting velar plosives
or blindfold, speech a minefield
of mumbled humblings
or morphed modes for global markets.

Whose life speeds by in French
in words insouciant
of the music of home
and words immersed
in a clear elemental
liquid self-in-the-world
hanging catlike over armrests,
filling any empty space
on a cluttered desk.

What language then for us?
what thrown shuttle
for our frayed cloth of
melancholy, its thinning
threads – all those Englishes
we’ve lived in, shared or
unshared isles bristling
with difference or
chuckling at old jokes

and the blown sand

9of that once-upon-a-time strand.

10Shallows

11Shallow waters caught between
the deep and the high dry sand
Kind to toes and blennies
Warm the shore lines
Up for a massage to mould
Into runnels smooth as set
Tallow pleasing to combers
And angler ancestors
Channels wet for worms
Mineral-animal
prised from their casts

Wade smulching out
To the shrill gulls, gulp
splash of brackish water
Sparkling drops on skin
And hair gleaming seal-like
To a rock rugged-sharp
Wrinkled footsoles gripping
Limpets chimplike
Perching on a locus solus
Facing the drizzle, mind
Adrift on soft sea-skin.

12Gasp from the past

13On my smartphone
A jab on the chin
Chant, chantonner, chan-tourner

En rondes blondes
Petites filles fraîches,
Flesh de ta flesh

Fleurs des champs et des haies
Fleurs, filles, famille je vous…
Dit le fils je vous dis ou la fille

Mais l’adulte protecteur
Mais le père débonnaire
Mais le père pas le père pas le

Per-ambulator cot
Of pale yellow
Caresses the hedgerow
(Not lurching down steps)

Your wife is in heaven
But you well you’re not;
You’re exiled in Devon

Haut de page

Notes

1 Sara Greaves and Monique De Mattia-Viviès, Language Learning and the Mother Tongue: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, trans. by Sara Greaves (Cambridge University Press, 2022), p.18.

2 A notion introduced in my book (a critical study and a bilingual edition) Côté guerre côté jardin : excursions dans la poésie de James Fenton, Presses Universitaires de Provence, 2016 and developed further in « Entre langue maternelle et langue(s) étrangère(s), une ‘voix-peau’ plurilingue… », in press.

3 « Entrer dans la langue ou dans les langues : de la langue maternelle à la langue mat-rangère », E-rea 16.1/2018, https://journals.openedition.org/erea/6502

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence électronique

Sara GREAVES, « Mother Tongue: language variations »E-rea [En ligne], 20.1 | 2022, mis en ligne le 15 décembre 2022, consulté le 02 février 2023. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/erea/15389 ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/erea.15389

Haut de page

Auteur

Sara GREAVES

Aix Marseille Univ, LERMA, Aix-en-Provence, France
sara.greaves@univ-amu.fr
Sara Greaves is professor of translation studies, 20th and 21st century poetry and creative writing at Aix-Marseille University and a member of the LERMA research centre. She is head of the ECMA Master’s degree (Cultural Studies on the English-Speaking World). In 2007/8 she took a D.U. qualification at Aix-Marseille University in facilitating creative writing workshops, and began developing the creative pedagogy that comprises a large part of her lecturing practice today: creative translation, plurilingual creative writing workshops, self-translation, transcultural poetry: criticism and creation, among others. She has published Côté guerre côté jardin : excursions dans la poésie de James Fenton, Presses Universitaires de Provence, 2016 and co-edited, with Monique De Mattia-Viviès, Language Learning and the Mother Tongue: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, Cambridge University Press, 2022. She has published four poems in Cadences : a journal of literature and the arts in Cyprus, vol. 10 (2014).
Sara Greaves est professeure en traductologie, poésie britannique des 20ème et 21ème siècles et écriture créative à Aix-Marseille Université, membre du LERMA (Laboratoire d’Études et de Recherches sur le Monde Anglophone) et responsable du Master ECMA (Études Culturelles du Monde Anglophone). En 2007/8 elle a passé le D.U. Formation à l’animation d’ateliers d’écriture à Aix-Marseille Université et a commencé à développer la pédagogie créative qui constitue une part importante de son enseignement aujourd’hui : traduction créative, ateliers d’écriture plurilingue, autotraduction, poésie transculturelle, entre autres. Elle a publié Côté guerre côté jardin : excursions dans la poésie de James Fenton (Presses Universitaires de Provence, 2016) et, avec Monique De Mattia-Viviès, co-édité Language Learning and the Mother Tongue: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, trans. by Sara Greaves (Cambridge University Press, 2022). Elle a publié quatre poèmes dans Cadences : a journal of literature and the arts in Cyprus, vol. 10 (2014).

Articles du même auteur

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

CC-BY-NC-ND-4.0

Creative Commons - Attribution - Pas d'Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 4.0 International - CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Haut de page
  • Logo Laboratoire d’Études et de Recherche sur le Monde Anglophone
  • DOAJ - Directory of Open Access Journals
  • OpenEdition Journals
Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search