Skip to navigation – Site map

HomeNuméros242études et essaisThe Tunisian Law on Violence agai...

études et essais

The Tunisian Law on Violence against Women

Advocacy and Reform
La loi tunisienne contre la violence à l’égard des femmes. Mobilisations et réformes
Maaike Voorhoeve
p. 377-394

Abstracts

In 2017, Tunisia issued the law on violence against women. Both Islamists and non-Islamists were in favor of the law, which was adopted with unanimity by the Tunisian Parliament. Such a development challenges the literature on regime change and women’s rights, which warns for a rollback after regime change. This article examines the limits of the consensus on this new law and the arguments mobilized in the debates.

Top of page

Excerpt

Cairn

Full-text article available to subscribers or on a "pay per view" basis. It will be available on this URL in January 2024.
Read it

Outline

Women’s Rights Advocacy and Legislation on Violence against Women (1956-2011)
Women’s Rights Advocacy
Legislation on Gender-Based Violence
Women’s Rights Advocacy and Legislation on Violence against Women since 2011
Questioning the Authoritarian Legacy
The Law of 2017
Contestations and Debates
Mobilizing Religion and Culture
Using the Religious Argument to Oppose Elements of the Law
The Interest of the Family

First lines

Tunisia has the reputation of being an exception in the region where women’s rights are concerned (Welchman 2007). It owes this reputation to the laws and policies of its first president, Habib Bourguiba (1956-1987), and, to a lesser extent, to his successor Ben Ali (1987-2011). The 1956 Tunisian Personal Status Code, which deviates significantly from Maliki and Hanafi fiqh (the normative systems that had henceforth dominated family law in Tunisia) is particularly famous. With this Code, Bourguiba inaugurated a policy of State feminism as well as secularism that would characterize Tunisian rule for decades to come. Under both Bourguiba and Ben Ali, rule was also highly authoritarian, leaving no room for political opponents, such as the Islamist movement Ennahda.

Since the ousting of President Ben Ali in the so-called “Arab Spring” of 2011, Tunisia has been governed by a series of democratic governments in which Ennahda seated with non-Islamist parties. Tunisian women’s rights organiz...

Top of page

References

Bibliographical reference

Maaike Voorhoeve, « The Tunisian Law on Violence against Women »,  Cahiers d’études africaines, 242 | 2021, 377-394.

Electronic reference

Maaike Voorhoeve, « The Tunisian Law on Violence against Women »,  Cahiers d’études africaines [Online], 242 | 2021, Online since 02 January 2024, connection on 22 September 2021. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/etudesafricaines/34304  ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/etudesafricaines.34304

Top of page

About the author

Maaike Voorhoeve

Faculty of Humanities, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Top of page

Copyright

© Cahiers d’Études africaines

Top of page
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search