Navigation – Plan du site
Littérature

‘A lament for the Fianna in a time when Ireland shall be changed’: Prospective/Prescriptive Memory and (Post-)Revolutionary Discourse in Mythological Gate Plays

Ruud Van Den Beuken
p. 197-208

Résumés

This article analyses how Micheál macLíammóir’s Diarmuid and Gráinne (1928) and An Philibín’s Tristram and Iseult (1929) reimagine the function of mythology in the Free State by infusing their dramatic representations of these legendary marriages with Irish revolutionary discourse of a much later period. In both plays, mythological tropes are retroactively imbued with anachronistic cultural memories of the Easter Rising to provide the newly independent nation with a redemptive teleology.

Haut de page

Extrait du texte

Ce document sera publié en ligne en texte intégral en novembre 2020.

Plan

Politicised marriages and prospective/prescriptive memory strategies
“Those that are in my secret thoughts will be remembered in Ireland forever”:
Micheál macLíammóir’s Diarmuid and Gráinne (1928)
“The gods, in divine equality, / Shall touch with immortality / Their names, that these may nowise pass”: An Philibín’s Tristram and Iseult (1929)
Conclusion

Aperçu du texte

In his discussion of the mythologisation of revolutionary sacrifice in Irish politics and literature, Richard Kearney observes that “myth often harbours memories which reason ignores at its peril. Myths of motherland are more than antique curiosities; they retain a purchase on the contemporary mind and can play a pivotal role in mobilizing sentiments of national identity”. While Kearney mostly focuses on the politics of prose and poetry, his discussion of the potency – as well as the risk – of literal myth-making is implicitly confirmed in a theatrical context by Richard Allen Cave’s comprehensive analysis of W.B. Yeats and George Moore’s Diarmuid and Grania (1901), Æ’s Deirdre (1902), Yeats’s Deirdre (1906), J.M. Synge’s Deirdre of the Sorrows (1910), and Lady Gregory’s Grania (1912), for he notes that in early twentieth-century Ireland, “[d]ramatising the lives of Deirdre or Grania was fraught with creat...

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Ruud Van Den Beuken, « ‘A lament for the Fianna in a time when Ireland shall be changed’: Prospective/Prescriptive Memory and (Post-)Revolutionary Discourse in Mythological Gate Plays », Études irlandaises, 43-2 | 2018, 197-208.

Référence électronique

Ruud Van Den Beuken, « ‘A lament for the Fianna in a time when Ireland shall be changed’: Prospective/Prescriptive Memory and (Post-)Revolutionary Discourse in Mythological Gate Plays », Études irlandaises [En ligne], 43-2 | 2018, mis en ligne le 01 novembre 2020, consulté le 18 janvier 2019. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/etudesirlandaises/5953 ; DOI : 10.4000/etudesirlandaises.5953

Haut de page

Auteur

Ruud Van Den Beuken

Dr Ruud van den Beuken is a lecturer at Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherlands). He was awarded the 2015 Irish Society for Theatre Research (ISTR) New Scholars’ Prize for his research on postcolonial mythological plays, and in April 2017, he received his PhD (cum laude) for his thesis on cultural memory and national identity formation at the Dublin Gate Theatre. He is the Assistant Director of the NWO-funded Gate Theatre Research Network and the recipient of the 2017 Education Award for Best Junior Lecturer in the Faculty of Arts at Radboud. In February/March 2018, he held a Visiting Research Fellowship at the Moore Institute (National University of Ireland, Galway). He is currently finalising a book-length monograph on the Gate Theatre.

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Presses universitaires de Rennes

Haut de page