Navigation – Plan du site

AccueilNumérosvariaKarst morphologies and ghostrock ...

Karst morphologies and ghostrock karstification

Morphologies karstiques et fantômisation
Caroline Dubois, Alfredo Bini et Yves Quinif
p. 13-31

Résumés

Les morphologies karstiques souterraines sont souvent utilisées par les scientifiques pour spéculer sur les conditions de formation des cavités karstiques, par exemple : écoulement en zone vadose ou phréatique, écoulement sur remplissage sédimentaire et écoulement fluviatile. Cependant, le développement récent des modèles de karstification de type « fantômes de roche » fournit de nouvelles informations sur l'origine de ces formes et microformes. Pour la karstification par fantômisation, la dissolution chimique sélective de la roche s'accompagne de la sortie des espèces solubles hors du système tandis que les particules non dissoutes restent sur place (altérite résiduelle). D’autre part, dans la karstification par enlèvement total, les particules non dissoutes sont simultanément érodées du système conduisant à la création d'un vide macroscopique. Cet article présente de nombreuses observations de terrain sur des morphologies karstiques qui étaient auparavant considérées comme résultant d'une karstification par enlèvement total, dans un contexte de karstification par fantômisation. A partir d'elles, il a été démontré que la plupart des morphologies karstiques peuvent résulter des deux processus, ce qui nécessite une grande prudence dans l'interprétation de ces microformes.

Haut de page

Notes de la rédaction

Manuscript received on August 23, 2020, revised version received on February 17, 2021, definitively accepted on December 15, 2021

Texte intégral

In memory of the regretted late Professor Alfredo Bini, our brother in friendship.

1. Introduction

1Generally, speleologists and geomorphologists use karst morphologies and micromorphologies to speculate on the conditions of formation of karst cavities (Bögli, 1980; Ford and Williams, 2007; Ford and Cullingford, 1976; Renault, 1970; Salomon, 2006; White, 1989). These causal relationships between shape and processes are essentially based on analogies. As it is not an experimental science, the conclusions made can only be regarded as hypotheses and models from which you cannot draw certainties. Only a few microforms, such as scallops, have been recreated in the laboratory using analog or physical models (Curl, 1966, 1974) but even in this case, we must be cautious. Indeed, it is not because one phenomenon can result in the formation of some morphologies, that it is its only possible cause.

2Since the middle 2000s, new speleogenesis processes were highlighted: it is the ghostrock karstification (Dubois et al., 2014a; Kaufmann, 2000; Quinif, 2010a; Quinif and Bruxelles, 2011; Quinif and Maire, 2010; Quinif et al., 2014; Vergari, 1996). Unlike conventional theories of karstification which result in the direct creation of a macroscopic voids, the formation of caves by ghostrock karstification is a two-stage process: (i) at first the rock is weathered in-situ and only the dissolved elements are drained away, leaving in place a material called residual alterite composed of the undissolved components; (ii) in a subsequent evolution, the alterite is eroded, leaving macroscopic voids. In this context, a variety of karst morphologies were observed (Dubois et al., 2011), which requires us to completely reconsider the origin and genesis of these kind of forms (e.g., networks structuration, galleries shapes, walls microforms, a.s.o.).

3The first part of the manuscript makes a brief synthesis on the evolution of the geomorphology followed by the presentation of the two karstification processes: karstification by total removal and ghostrock karstification. The second part classifies and details the karst morphologies from the network to the microform scale. The third part presents the different morphologies observed in the context of ghostrock karstification. The last part highlights the implications of this new classification of karst morphologies in the study of caves.

2. Background

2.1. Caves and geomorphology

4The literature on karst morphology is abundant. It would be pointless to make a comprehensive study in this manuscript. Only a few main stages of the evolution of this field will be discussed here. One of the founders of the micromorphology in caves is undoubtedly Bretz (1942) in his famous publication: “Vadose and phreatic features of limestone caves”. In this article, the author follows Davis (1930)’s concept of a two-stage speleogenesis: (i) deep phreatic speleogenesis with creation of macroscopic voids, and (ii) transition to vadose zone with the underground rivers flow and the filling of the cavity by speleothems. To this theory, Bretz adds a third stage: the sedimentation within the gallery. He studied the conditions of occurrence for each stage and the resulting karst forms. In French literature, authors such as De Joly (1946), Gèze (1973), Trombe (1952), Chevalier (1944), specifically describe some types of forms, however without making a synthesis of all the karst features. Gèze (1973) wrote the outline of a dictionary based only on the descriptive aspect of the forms. Renault and Bini are providing a much more comprehensive study of karst morphologies in relation with mechanical phenomena and sedimentology in speleogenesis (Bini, 1980; Renault, 1958, 1967, 1968, 1970; Renault and Caumartin, 1958).

5Following these researches, geomorphology has commonly been used to find the geological conditions and genetic phenomena responsible for the formation of cavities: phreatic or vadose zone, torrential or still water, chemical and physical effects, etc. Among all this literature, Slabe (1955) has proposed a very comprehensive thesis on the subject. On another hand, many microforms were studied individually, or as a synthetic aspect, in connection with some genetic mechanisms (Allen, 1972; Bini, 1978, 1979, 2007; Bini and Cappa, 1978; Bögli, 1964; Corbel, 1962; Curl, 1966; Ewers, 1966; Quinif, 1973; Viehmann, 1959, 1973). Some microforms, such as scallops, have also been studied combining observations and experimentation (Curl, 1974; Lismonde and Lagmani, 1987).

6Since the 2010s, new observations question the previously established links between microforms and setting conditions. It now appears that different phenomena may lead to the creation of similar forms (Dubois et al., 2011, 2014a).

2.2. Karstification by total removal

7Historically, the formation of caves is considered as a one stage process including both chemical and mechanical erosion. When calcium carbonate comes into contact with water, dissolution occurs when the solution is undersaturated with respect to calcite. In the traditional karstification theory, the water flow drains the dissolved component of the rock but also erodes the not yet dissolved particles of the rock (Bretz, 1942; Bögli, 1980; Davis, 1930; Ford and Williams, 2007; Ford and Cullingford, 1976; Jakucs, 1977; Jennings, 1971; Renault, 1967; 1968; Salomon, 2006; White, 1989). This way, no material remains as a product of the weathering and the karstification by total removal leads to the creation of open voids. The environmental conditions of this karstification are (Quinif, 1998) (fig. 1): (1) the presence of more permeable zones in the rock such as opened joints or previous galleries, to let the stream flow; (2) water chemically aggressive to dissolve the calcium carbonate; (3) water with sufficient energy to remove both dissolved and undissolved particles.

Fig. 1 - The two processes of karstification (after Dubois et al., 2014a).
Fig. 1 - Les deux processus de karstification (d’après Dubois et al., 2014a).

Fig. 1 - The two processes of karstification (after Dubois et al., 2014a).Fig. 1 - Les deux processus de karstification (d’après Dubois et al., 2014a).

A: Karstification by total removal requires a considerable amount of chemical energy to dissolve the calcium carbonate as well as a considerable amount of hydrodynamic energy to remove both the dissolved species and undissolved particles. Water must be able to flow through the rock for karstification to occur and preferential pathways are provided by opened joints or emptied galleries resulting from previous karstogenesis; B: ghostrock karstification requires a considerable amount of chemical energy to dissolve the calcium carbonate but only a small amount of hydrodynamic energy to remove the dissolved species while leaving the undissolved particles in place. Preferential pathways are provided by opened joints or more transmissive zones within the rock. The undissolved particles will be removed by the flowing water if the hydrodynamic energy increases sufficiently.
A : La karstification par enlèvement total nécessite une quantité considérable d'énergie chimique pour dissoudre le carbonate de calcium ainsi qu'une quantité considérable d'énergie hydrodynamique pour éliminer à la fois les espèces dissoutes et les particules non dissoutes. L'eau doit pouvoir s'écouler à travers la roche pour que la karstification se produise et des voies préférentielles sont fournies par des joints ouverts ou des galeries vidées résultant d'une karstogenèse antérieure ; B : La karstification par fantômisation nécessite une quantité considérable d'énergie chimique pour dissoudre le carbonate de calcium, mais seulement une petite quantité d'énergie hydrodynamique pour éliminer les espèces dissoutes tout en laissant les particules non dissoutes en place. Les voies préférentielles sont fournies par des joints ouverts ou des zones plus transmissives au sein de la roche. Les particules non dissoutes seront éliminées par écoulement de type fluviatile si l'énergie hydrodynamique augmente suffisamment.

2.3. Ghostrock karstification

2.3.1. The process

8Unlike the theory of karstification by total removal, the ghostrock karstification is a two stages process separating the chemical dissolution of limestone from the mechanical erosion of the insoluble or less soluble substances (Dubois et al., 2014a; Quinif, 2010b; Quinif et al., 2014). When the water dissolves the carbonates of the rock, only the dissolved components are drained away with the water. The undissolved particles (e.g., sparitic part of the rock as fossils, filling of tension gashes and insoluble minerals such clays minerals) remain in place within the rock matrix constituting the residual alterite: a material related to the parent rock but whose properties have been altered by the weathering. The environmental conditions characterizing this karstification are (fig. 1): (i) the presence of permeable pathways in the rock such as opened joints (Quinif et al., 1997) or more porous zones (Dubois et al., 2011) to let the stream flow; (ii) water chemically aggressive to dissolve the calcium carbonate; (iii) water with low hydrodynamism; the flow must be sufficient to renew the acid solution but not too intense as to erode the alterite (Quinif, 1998). Later in the subsequent geological evolution of the region, if these conditions change and the hydrodynamic energy become sufficient, the mechanical erosion of the undissolved particles is possible leading to the creation of an opened karst. These changes can be due to the lowering of the water table by creation of a relief (Bini et al., 2012) or by anthropic effect (Quinif and Maire, 2010) or to the seasonal variation of the water table (Dandurand et al., 2014). When emptied this karst can evolve like any other classical karst, by mechanical and chemical erosion, speleothems development, aggradation, oversteepening, and other processes.

9The material resulting from the weathering is called alterite. It can be an isalterite or an alloterite depending on whether the material keeps or not the general structure of the rock. In this manuscript, the studied materials are essentially isalterite as defined by Delvigne (1998): “a weathering product with slight or no change in rock volume and remnant rock structure”. Therefore, the terminology alterite is used to refer to isalterite. This material, comprising the less soluble elements of the rock, is very different from its parent. The weathering affects the rock matrix in several ways: as the calcium carbonate is dissolved there is a change in the overall composition of the material and its structure, while removal of the dissolved species creates a secondary porosity within the matrix, altering the hydrological properties of the rock and its mechanical strength. However, the alterite keeps the original structure of the parent rock and insoluble elements remain distinguishable (e.g., fossils, cherts, calcite veining).

10The ghostrocks are all filled with their alterite and the overall structure of the parent rock is preserved. If ghostrock features form a network, the entire area is described as a ghostrock karst network. A typology is proposed based on the status of the ghostrock: (i) a ghostrock is active if the weathering phenomena are still occurring; (ii) a ghostrock is inactive if no more weathering phenomena are occurring; (iii) a ghostrock is fossilized if it is sealed by impermeable sediments and is, in this case, designated as a ghost-paleokarst (Bates, 1980; Jackson, 1977); (iv) a ghostrock emptied of its alterite is called open or emptied ghostrock.

11The ghostrock karst network may ramify through the bedrock (fig. 2) and like most geological objects; it is hardly possible to visualize a ghostrock in its whole. For this, geophysical methods must be use to visualize the ghostrocks and distinguish between voids and ghostrocks. The observable features are the traces of the ghostrock on intersecting planes. According to the section plane, the visible morphologies differ. A nomenclature of ghostrock features traces is established to highlight their characteristic geometries. In a fresh unweathered limestone (A), one finds wide weathered zones (B) which are situated beneath the overburden and are often affected by compaction due to their dimensions which draws down the overlying cover and weathered corridors (C) which are vertical features to more ten meters height and ghost-endokarst which appear in the form of sections of pseudo-galleries (D) or vast volumes totally included in the rock mass (E). Often, the limestone is covered by a transgressive overburden (F).

Fig. 2 - Schematic diagram showing typical ghostrock features (modified from Kaufmann, 2000).
Fig. 2 - Schéma montrant les caractéristiques typiques d’un massif fantômisé (modifié à partir de Kaufmann, 2000).

Fig. 2 - Schematic diagram showing typical ghostrock features (modified from Kaufmann, 2000).Fig. 2 - Schéma montrant les caractéristiques typiques d’un massif fantômisé (modifié à partir de Kaufmann, 2000).

A: Fresh unweathered limestone; B: Large weathered features; C: Weathered corridors; D: Ghost-endokarst; E: Weathered galleries; F: Overburden.
A : Calcaire frais non altéré ; B : Grands volumes altérés ; C : Couloirs altérés ; D : Pseudoendokarst (fantômes internes); E : Fantômes en galeries; F : Formations de couverture.

2.3.2. Field case example

12The more representative occurrences of ghostrock karstification are in the Carboniferous limestones of southern Belgium (from Tournai to Soignies, Hainaut). This area has been wildly studied in the literature (Dubois et al., 2014b; Havron et al., 2007; Kaufmann, 2000; Kaufmann et al., 1999; Quinif, 2010a; Quinif and Maire, 2010; Quinif et al., 2012, 2014; Vergari, 1996, 1998). This is a very competent limestone highly fossiliferous composed of 80% to 95% calcite. The strata are monocline and the bedrock has suffered several tectonic stages causing the creation of several conjugate families of subvertical joints. The basement is unconformably overlain by Cenozoic overburden. These limestones are exploited by numerous quarries which constitute exceptional places to observe karst phenomena.

13The ghostrock features spread vertically along the initial fractures of the rock. They are mainly weathered corridors under the overburden (fig. 3A) or within the rock (fig. 3B) as well as ghostrock endokarst (fig. 3C). As the weathering follows the different families of fractures, it forms a 3D maze network of karst.

Fig. 3 - Examples of ghostrock features in the Carboniferous limestone around Soignies in southern Belgium (after Dubois et al., 2014a).
Fig. 3 - Exemples de formations fantômes dans le calcaire carbonifère autour de Soignies dans le sud de la Belgique (d’après Dubois et al., 2014a).

Fig. 3 - Examples of ghostrock features in the Carboniferous limestone around Soignies in southern Belgium (after Dubois et al., 2014a).Fig. 3 - Exemples de formations fantômes dans le calcaire carbonifère autour de Soignies dans le sud de la Belgique (d’après Dubois et al., 2014a).

A: Large weathered zone situated at the top of the limestone. As the alterite has undergone compaction the overburden has been drawn down into the weathered corridor; B: Weathered corridor still containing its residual alterite; C: Ghost-endokarst completely included in the rock.
A : Grande zone altérée située au sommet du calcaire. Au fur et à mesure que l'altérite a subi un compactage, les formations de couverture ont été entraînées dans le couloir altéré; B : Couloir altéré contenant encore son altérite résiduelle ; C : Pseudoendokarst complètement inclus dans la roche.

2.3.3. The resulting material

14The ghostrock features are filled with the undissolved components of the limestone: the insoluble particles (e.g., cherts, clays, quartz) and the not yet dissolved CaCO3 constituents (micritic calcite, sparitic calcite crystals, fossils). Several sets of analyses were performed on samples taken in stratigraphic continuity to represent a variation in the intensity of weathering ranging from fresh to completely weathered rock: Tournaisian siliceous limestone from Tournai (Kaufmann et al., 1999), limestone with cherts and encrinites limestone from Soignies (Dubois et al., 2014b; Havron et al., 1999), Jurassic limestone with cherts from Charente (Dandurand et al., 2014). Whatever the lithology, the results show the following outcomes (fig. 4): (i) the dissolution and drainage of part or all of the CaCO3; (ii) an increase in porosity; (iii) a weakening of the mechanical properties which makes the material friable. There is also possibility of (iv) a gravity compaction of the alterite and/or, (v) a slight illuviation of minerals (clays, organic matters, etc.) into the alterite (Dubois et al., 2014).

Fig. 4 - Thin-sections of the Carboniferous encrinites limestone from Soignies analysed under cathodoluminescence microscopy.
Fig. 4 - Lames minces du calcaire carbonifère à encrinite de Soignies analysées en microscopie à cathodoluminescence.

Fig. 4 - Thin-sections of the Carboniferous encrinites limestone from Soignies analysed under cathodoluminescence microscopy.Fig. 4 - Lames minces du calcaire carbonifère à encrinite de Soignies analysées en microscopie à cathodoluminescence.

A: Fresh rock mainly composed by micro-crystalline calcite, carbonated fossils and dolomite. No porosity is visible on the thin section; B: completely weathered rock made of fragments of fossils, amorphous black minerals and voids. The calcareous matrix has been dissolved leading to the creation of porosity. Exogenous minerals have sweep in the alterite. From Dubois et al., 2014a.
A : Roche fraîche composée principalement de calcite microcristalline, de fossiles carbonatés et de dolomie. Aucune porosité n'est visible sur la lame mince ; B : roche complètement altérée constituée de fragments de fossiles, de minéraux noirs amorphes et de vides. La matrice calcaire s'est dissoute entraînant la création de porosité. Les minéraux exogènes ont balayé l'altérite. D’après Dubois et al., 2014a.

3. Descriptions of underground karst morphologies

15This part gathers and summarizes the main families of underground karst features. The classification made is based purely on morphological description of the forms starting with cave patterns, then cavity shapes and finally parietal microforms.

3.1. Cave patterns

16The network structures presented here are classified by increasing complexity. They are named and described in the terminology of Palmer (1991) (tab. 1, fig. 5). Longitudinally caves can be organized according to different patterns: horizontal, inclined, staggered and spread on multiple levels. Caves can also be abyssal and plunge quickly at great depths.

Tab. 1 - Presentation and description of the cave patterns (Palmer, 1991).
Tab. 1 - Présentation et description des réseaux de grottes (Palmer, 1991).

Tab. 1 - Presentation and description of the cave patterns (Palmer, 1991).Tab. 1 - Présentation et description des réseaux de grottes (Palmer, 1991).

A: Single gallery; B: Branchwork; C: Network; D: Anastomotic; E: Spongework; F: Ramiform.
A : Galerie unique ; B : Ramifié ; C : Réseau ; D : En anastomose ; E : En éponge ; F : Ramiforme.

Fig. 5 - Common cave patterns (modified from Palmer, 1991).
Fig. 5 - Modèles de grottes communs (modifié à partir de Palmer, 1991).

Fig. 5 - Common cave patterns (modified from Palmer, 1991).Fig. 5 - Modèles de grottes communs (modifié à partir de Palmer, 1991).

The sketches can illustrate both plan and cross-section views. A: Single gallery: Vilaine Source Cave, Namur; B: Branchwork: Rouffignac Cave, Dordogne, France (from Martel in Gèze, 1965); C: Network: Breathing Cave, Virginia, USA (from Deike, 1960); D: Anastomotic: Hölloch Cave, Schwyz, Switzerland (from Bögli, 1970); E: Ramiform and Spongework: Carlsbad Cavern, New Mexico, USA (Bretz, 1949).
Les croquis peuvent illustrer des vues en plan et en coupe. A : Galerie unique : Grotte de la Source Vilaine, Namur ; B : Réseau en arborescence : Grotte de Rouffignac, Dordogne, France (de Martel dans Gèze, 1965) ; C : Réseau : Breathing Cave, Virginie, USA (d'après Deike, 1960) ; D : Anastomosé : Grotte de Hölloch, Schwyz, Suisse (d'après Bögli, 1970) ; E : Ramiforme et en épong : Carlsbad Cavern, Nouveau-Mexique, États-Unis (Bretz, 1949).

3.2. Cavity shapes

17The shapes of the cavities are classified according to their main extension (horizontal or/and vertical) and to their dimensions.

3.2.1. Horizontal features.

18Sections of karst which preferentially extend horizontally (fig. 6-7). These can be galleries, passages, or other horizontal or slightly inclined conduits. Their sections are often linked to the structural conditions (nature and geometry of fracturing, morphology of the more porous area, etc.). Their opening can vary from centimeters to several tens of meters while their extension is up to some kilometers. The morphologies of the horizontal features essentially depend on their development and on the parietal features that shaped them (cf. § 3.3.).

Fig. 6 - Common sections of horizontal features.
Fig. 6 - Sections courantes de formes horizontales.

Fig. 6 - Common sections of horizontal features.Fig. 6 - Sections courantes de formes horizontales.

A: Kavuaya Cave, Bas-Congo, RDC (Quinif, 1985); B: Chalet Cave, Aywaille, Belgium; C, E: Luweng Banteng, Gunung Sewu, Java (Quinif, 1984); D: Damous Fedjoudj, Algeria (Quinif, 1977); G, H, I: Fréyr Cave, Dinant, Belgium (Quinif, 1982); J: Lorette Cave, Rochefort, Belgium (Vandycke and Quinif, 2001).
A : Grotte de Kavuaya, Bas-Congo, RDC (Quinif, 1985) ; B : Grotte du Chalet, Aywaille, Belgique ; C, E : Luweng Banteng, Gunung Sewu, Java (Quinif, 1984) ; D : Damous Fedjoudj, Algérie (Quinif, 1977) ; G, H, I : Grotte de Fréyr, Dinant, Belgique (Quinif, 1982) ; J : Grotte de Lorette, Rochefort, Belgique (Vandycke et Quinif, 2001).

Fig. 7 - Some types of horizontal features.
Fig. 7 - Types de formes horizontales.

Fig. 7 - Some types of horizontal features.Fig. 7 - Types de formes horizontales.

A: Cave of “Les Echelles” (Massif de la Chartreuse, Rhône-Alpes, France); B: Cave of “Père Noël” (Massif de Han-sur-Lesse); C: Cave of Han-sur-Lesse; D: Cave of Trabuc, Gard, France.
A : Grotte des « Echelles » (Massif de la Chartreuse, Rhône-Alpes, France) ; B : Grotte du « Père Noël » (Massif de Han-sur-Lesse) ; C : Grotte de Han-sur-Lesse ; D : Grotte de Trabuc, Gard, France.

3.2.2. Vertical features.

19There are sections of karst which preferentially extend vertically (fig. 8-9). These can be pits, shafts, corridors or other vertical conduits. These features can be connected to other karst features. In this case, different resulting morphologies can develop such as dome pits or stepped conduits. They can also be isolated and directly opened from the surface like the « avens ». Pits aperture can vary from centimeters to several tens of meters and can reach several hundred meters deep.

Fig. 8 - Examples of vertical features.
Fig. 8 - Exemples de formes verticales.

Fig. 8 - Examples of vertical features.Fig. 8 - Exemples de formes verticales.

A: Avens in Sidi Rgheiss Mountain, Algeria (Quinif, 1975); B: Aven of the “Bloc coïncé” in Rawil Mountain, Bern, Switzerland (Topography by Quinif and Maboge); C: Part of the cave Trou des Nûtons, Namur, Belgium (Quinif, 1978); D: Aven Armand, Languedoc-Roussillon, France (Martel, 1894).
A : Avens dans la montagne du Sidi Rgheiss, Algérie (Quinif, 1975) ; B : Aven du « Bloc coïncé », Rawil, Berne, Suisse (Topographie de Quinif et Maboge) ; C : Partie de la grotte du Trou des Nûtons, Namur, Belgique (Quinif, 1978) ; D : Aven Armand, Languedoc-Roussillon, France (Martel, 1894).

Fig. 9 - Examples of vertical feature.
Fig. 9 - Exemples de formes verticales.

Fig. 9 - Examples of vertical feature.Fig. 9 - Exemples de formes verticales.

A: “Trou Bernard”, Namur, Belgium. This pit is a step-in a down going gallery; B: Aven in the high Alps, Switzerland; C: Aven in Debagh Mountain (Algeria).
A : « Trou Bernard », Namur, Belgique. Ce puits est une galerie descendante en marches d’escalier; B : Aven dans les hautes Alpes, Suisse; C : Aven au Djebel Debagh (Algérie).

3.2.3. Rooms

20Their dimensions are larger than the dimensions of the conduits and which are connected to it (fig. 10). Rooms can extend up to extensions of hundreds of meters long and tens of meters height.

Fig. 10 - “Dôme” Room, cave of Han-sur-Lesse, Rochefort, Belgium (Quinif and Bastin, 1984).
Fig. 10 - Salle « Dôme », grotte de Han-sur-Lesse, Rochefort, Belgique (Quinif et Bastin, 1984).

Fig. 10 - “Dôme” Room, cave of Han-sur-Lesse, Rochefort, Belgium (Quinif and Bastin, 1984).Fig. 10 - Salle « Dôme », grotte de Han-sur-Lesse, Rochefort, Belgique (Quinif et Bastin, 1984).

G.N. Geographic North. M.N. Magnetic North. S. Sumps.
G.N. Nord géographique. M.N. Nord magnétique. S. Puisards.

3.3. Solutional sculpturing

21Solutional sculpturing are morphologies visible on the walls, the ceiling and the base of cavities (White, 1988) (fig. 11). They may have a positive or negative relief and their dimensions are variable, but are often centimeter to meter scale. Solutional sculpturing classification based on morphological description has been established by Gèze (1973). This section describes common microforms (Jackson, 1997; Viala, 2000) and introduces the genetic causes usually associated: ceiling pocket, domes, notches, projections, stone laces, anastomosis, pendants, potholes, overdeepenings, scallops, stone laces, vertical flutes, meander niches (tab. 2).

Fig. 11 - Solutional sculpturing.
Fig. 11 - Microformes de dissolution.

Fig. 11 - Solutional sculpturing.Fig. 11 - Microformes de dissolution.

A: Ceiling pocket - Cave of “Père Euchère”, Vaucluse, France; B: Differential dissolution features - Père Noël Cave, Han-sur-Lesse, Namur, Belgium; C: Anastomosis – “Vilaine Source” Cave, Namur, Belgium; D: Pendants – “Père Noël” Cave, Han-sur-Lesse, Namur, Belgium; E: Overdeepening and potholes - The “Barrique” Hole, Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France; F: Scallops, “Nou Maulin” Cave, Namur, Belgium.
A : Coupole - Grotte du « Père Euchère », Vaucluse, France ; B : Microformes de dissolution différentielle - Grotte du Père Noël, Han-sur-Lesse, Namur, Belgique ; C : Anastomoses – Grotte « Vilaine Source », Namur, Belgique ; D : Pendants de voûte – Grotte du « Père Noël », Han-sur-Lesse, Namur, Belgique ; E : Surcreusement et marmite - Le trou de la « Barrique », Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France ; F : Coups de gouge, Grotte du « Nou Maulin », Namur, Belgique.

Tab. 2 - Description and commonly accepted origins of microforms.
Tab. 2 - Description et origines communément acceptées des microformes.

Tab. 2 - Description and commonly accepted origins of microforms.Tab. 2 - Description et origines communément acceptées des microformes.

4. Morphologies identified in ghostrock karstification

4.1. Cave patterns in ghostrock karstification

22Karst networks from karstification by total removal get structured by the water flows. At first, the system is unstructured. Then but progressively, the opening of the conduits enable the flow to intensify and structure the network as a dissipative system (Prigogine, 2017). These are branchwork network. On the contrary, ghostrock karst systems are not structured by the water flow as no open duct is created during the first stage. Therefore, the structure and location of the network only depends on the initial permeability of the rock and of the acid source. Detail these two parameters are extensively detailed in the following paragraphs (§ 4.1.1. and 4.1.2.).

23Mangin (1975) describes karst aquifers as the combination of highly hierarchized permeable zones (main drains) and annex systems greatly capacitive but less permeable. This description closely fits to karsts from total removal, but this section will show that this description can also match ghostrock karst networks.

4.1.1. The initial permeability

24The underground water is the main agent for rock weathering and for the drainage of the dissolved species. Therefore, the first condition to create a karst is a permeable pathway through the soluble rock. Several geological configurations may lead to this permeability: (i) open cracks; (ii) rock area with higher porosity; (iii) cavities resulting from previous karstogenesis. To enable efficient fluid circulation within the rock, these permeable zones should be sufficiently interconnected.

25Open cracks (joints, bedding planes, faults, etc.) are mostly inherited from past or/and current tectonic and only the cracks opened during the ghostrock karstification gets weathered. An example of permeability given by open cracks is ghostrock features of the Carboniferous limestone of Soignies (Hainaut, Belgium). During the Mesozoic, the limestone basement was affected by tectonic extension leading to the creation of 3 sets of open subvertical fractures: N60°E, N100°E, and N150°E (Quinif et al., 1997; Vandycke and Quinif, 1999). All of these fractures show weathering. These ghostrocks are then mainly structured as a regular network of vertical corridors (fig. 12-13).

Fig. 12 - Fracture Network in Clypot Quarry, Soignies, Hainaut (Belgium).
Fig. 12 - Réseau de fractures dans la carrière de Clypot, Soignies, Hainaut (Belgique).

Fig. 12 - Fracture Network in Clypot Quarry, Soignies, Hainaut (Belgium).Fig. 12 - Réseau de fractures dans la carrière de Clypot, Soignies, Hainaut (Belgique).

A: Photo of the South wall of the quarry. It shows the density of large corridors in Thiarmont Formation and narrower features but as dense in Soignies Formation; B: Map of the karst features (Quinif and Quinif, 2002). 1: Corridors. 2: Ghostrocks recognized in section. 3: Features attributed to caves. 4: Caves resulting from the removing of alterite and replacement by river. 5: Lapiaz. 6: Blocks.
A : Photo du mur sud de la carrière. Il montre la densité de grands corridors dans la Formation de Thiarmont et des formes plus étroites mais aussi denses dans la Formation de Soignies ; B : Carte des formes karstiques (Quinif et Quinif, 2002). 1 : Couloirs. 2 : fantômes de roche reconnus en coupe. 3 : Formes attribuées aux grottes. 4 : Grottes résultant de l'enlèvement de l'altérite et remplacement par l’action d’une rivière. 5 : Lapiaz. 6 : Blocs.

Fig. 13 - Crinoidal limestone of Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium.
Fig. 13 - Calcaire crinoïdique de Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique.

Fig. 13 - Crinoidal limestone of Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium. Fig. 13 - Calcaire crinoïdique de Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique.

The limestone is visible in Clypot Quarry, Soignies. It is a compact and non-porous limestone. The ghostrock features are located around the opened joints (A); B: The microscopic analyses of the fresh rock (PPL) show lots of fossils highly cemented by calcitic matrix; C: The microscopic analyses of the weathered rock (PPL) reveal voids (brown spots) between the fossils. The matrix has been dissolved.
Le calcaire est visible dans la carrière du Clypot, à Soignies. C'est un calcaire compact et non poreux. Les éléments de fantôme de roche sont situés autour des joints ouverts (A) ; B : Les analyses microscopiques de la roche fraîche (PPL) montrent de nombreux fossiles fortement cimentés par la matrice calcitique ; C : Les analyses microscopiques de la roche altérée (PPL) révèlent des vides (taches brunes) entre les fossiles. La matrice a été dissoute.

26When sedimentation and/or diagenesis are not homogeneous, the rock can present more porous area that can be organized along strata, lenses, etc., these areas are preferential flow paths. This is the case with the Oligocene bioclastic Limestone of Frontenac (Aquitaine, France) that presents a high initial porosity. Indeed, this limestone is slightly indurated due to low diagenetic process and very heterogeneous due to high lateral facies changes (Dubois et al., 2011). In this area, ghostrock features have been observed in quarries (fig. 14), they have globally horizontal extensions, connected to the surface through vertical cracks. The karst networks are structured as horizontal ghost-galleries linked by vertical ghost-pipes.

Fig. 14 - Bioclastic limestone of Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France (Dubois et al., 2011).
Fig. 14 - Calcaire bioclastique de Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France (Dubois et al., 2011).

Fig. 14 - Bioclastic limestone of Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France (Dubois et al., 2011).Fig. 14 - Calcaire bioclastique de Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France (Dubois et al., 2011).

A: The limestone is visible in Piquepoche Quarry, Frontenac. The darker area is the ghostrock features that have developed from an initial vertical fracture and then through a horizontal porous stratum; B: Rock sample of this limestone. Its texture shows fossils cemented to each other by calcite and a macroscopic porosity; C: The microscopic analyses of the fresh rock (XPL) expose the fossils, a calcitic matrix and some voids (black area); D: The microscopic analyses of the weathered rock (XPL) reveal big holes between the elements of the rock and the matrix; the fossils are riddled by holes.
A : Le calcaire est visible dans la carrière Piquepoche, Frontenac. La zone la plus sombre correspond aux éléments de fantôme de roche qui se sont développés à partir d'une fracture verticale initiale, puis à travers une strate poreuse horizontale ; B : Échantillon de ce calcaire. Sa texture montre des fossiles cimentés les uns aux autres par la calcite et une porosité macroscopique ; C : Les analyses microscopiques de la roche fraîche (XPL) mettent à nu les fossiles, une matrice calcitique et quelques vides (zone noire) ; D : Les analyses microscopiques de la roche altérée (XPL) révèlent de gros trous entre les éléments de la roche et la matrice ; les fossiles sont criblés de trous.

27In some cases, inherit karst systems have suffered a ghostrock karstification. It should be noted that all these systems are not within the conditions of ghostrock karstification. Indeed, the specificity of the ghostrock process is the resulting material left in-situ and the water flowing with little hydrodynamic energy. Thus, if an emptied gallery is in a system with high difference in elevation between the input and the output, the conditions for ghostrock karstification will not be met. By contrast, if the difference in elevation is low or if the gallery is filled by sediments, ghostrock karstification is conceivable. This is the case of the keyhole galleries in Gauthier-Wincqz Quarry, Soignies (Quinif et al., 1993). These features comprise 3 filling materials (fig. 15): stratified silt deposits at the top, a thin fluvial deposit with highly weathered quartz pebbles in the center and the residual alterite resulting from ghostrock karstification at the bottom. The presence of fluvial deposit indicates that the gallery had once been opened and that pebbles were carried and deposited there by an energetic water flow. However, the pebbles are now highly weathered and they could not have been transported in this state by the stream. Therefore, it appears that both weathering of the pebbles and weathering of the underlying limestone occurred after the filling of the gallery (Dubois et al., 2014a). The organization of this kind of network depends on the geometry of the initial karst system.

Fig. 15 - A ghostrock feature shaped as a keyhole at Gauthier-Wincqz Quarry in Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium.
Fig. 15 - Un fantôme de roche en forme de trou de serrure à la carrière Gauthier-Wincqz à Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique.

Fig. 15 - A ghostrock feature shaped as a keyhole at Gauthier-Wincqz Quarry in Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium.Fig. 15 - Un fantôme de roche en forme de trou de serrure à la carrière Gauthier-Wincqz à Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique.

A: Photo from Quinif et al. (1993); B: Sketch of the feature. 1. Fresh unweathered limestone; 2. Stratified silt deposits; 3. Thin fluvial deposit with highly weathered quartz pebbles; 4. Residual alterite resulting from ghostrock karstification.
A : Photo issue de Quinif et al. (1993) ; B : Croquis de la forme. 1. Calcaire frais non altéré ; 2. Dépôts de limon stratifiés ; 3. Mince dépôt fluviatile à galets de quartz fortement altérés; 4. Altérite résiduelle résultant de la karstification de type fantôme de roche.

4.1.2. The source of acidity

28The acid required for the dissolution of the limestone may have various origins: (i) pedological CO2; (ii) H2SO4 from sulphide oxidation; (iii) hydrothermal CO2; (iv) bacterial activity.

29(i) When meteoric waters infiltrate in the soil horizons, they become acidified by percolating through the organic matter which is rich in carbonic acid. This is probably the most common acid source for limestone weathering. In this case, the karst features develop from the top of the rock through the rock via joints or porous zones. It is not necessary to have a total dissolution of the carbonate at the top of the feature to get weathering in depth. Indeed, dissolution kinetics (Roques and Ek, 1973) shows a differential rate of dissolution according to the size of the particles. In reality the elements with high surface/volume ratio are more vulnerable to dissolution. Cave patterns from this process are mostly the combination of linear structures such as corridors, shafts, galleries.

30(ii) Sulphide minerals such as pyrite in the parent rock are very exposed to oxidation which produces sulfuric acid. This is a very corrosive acid that accelerate the dissolution of limestone. This source of acid has been related to the formation of ghostrock-feature in southern Belgium (Havron et al., 2007). As the acid source is dispersed through the rock, the structure of the karst feature is expending from the center of the weathering zone through the permeable pathways to form a star-shaped feature. Both hydrothermal and bacterial activity has been proved as potential source of acidity in the creation of karst in contexts identified as karstification by total removal. It is therefore likely that these sources of acidity are also involved in the process of ghost rock karstification. At present, hydrothermal or bacterial origin has not yet been proven in ghostrock karstification

31(iii) When they rise from the depth, hydrothermal waters are hot and can have high CO2 concentration (Audra et al., 2007; Bruxelles and Wienen, 2009; Egemeier, 1981; Klimchouk, 2007). In this case, the dissolution will spread from bottom to top but also in other directions according to the convection cells.

32(iv) Bacterial oxidation also has a role in the weathering of limestone (Barton et al., 2001; Northup and al., 2000). The most common reactions are redox reactions leading for example to the formation of sulphate from sulphide. However, these processes remain to be discovered in ghostrock karstification, even if the observations of bacteria have been made in Azé Cave (Burgundy, France) which is also known to be an emptied ghostrock (Baele et al., 2011; Papier et al., 2011). The structure of these features is star-shaped from the centrum of the weathering.

4.1.3. Resulting morphologies

33From these considerations, it results that ghostrock karst systems can be located at any depth in the basement. As water flows slowly during the weathering, there is only little energy that is dissipated and the ghostrock systems is not hierarchized by the flow. It is solely organized according to the more permeable pathways. Their structure is then often labyrinthine with dead-end galleries (fig. 16). When the geological conditions change so as the height difference between input and output of the system increases (e.g., deepening of the valleys, uplift), groundwater potential increases. If the ghostrock feature is not covered (for example if it is intersected by the relief), it becomes a resurgence and water flows out of the alterite and evacuate it by regressive mechanical erosion (Bini et al., 2012; Dubois et al., 2011; Quinif and Maire, 2010). This phenomenon is also known as piping or sapping. When this erosion reaches the surface at the upstream of the system, a connected loss-resurgence system is established. The initial unique aquifer is then divided by karst networks.

34In this erosion stage, all the alterite is not evacuated, the emptied voids are often structured with the water flow and become drains while the other conducts remain clogged with the alterite and constitute annex systems as defined by Mangin (1975).

Fig. 16 - Examples of labyrinthine cave networks in which the residual alterite has been observed (Dubois et al., 2014a).
Fig. 16 - Exemples de réseaux de grottes labyrinthiques dans lesquels l'altérite résiduelle a été observée (Dubois et al., 2014a).

Fig. 16 - Examples of labyrinthine cave networks in which the residual alterite has been observed (Dubois et al., 2014a).Fig. 16 - Exemples de réseaux de grottes labyrinthiques dans lesquels l'altérite résiduelle a été observée (Dubois et al., 2014a).

A: Trabuc Cave in Languedoc (France) is located at the contact between the Hettangian dolostone and Sinemurian limestone. This network comprises 10 km of galleries with difference in level of 200 m (Bruxelles, 1998); B: Fayt Cave in Ardennes (Belgium) is located in Devonian limestone. This network comprises 2 km of galleries with difference in level of 50 m; C: Felix-Mazauric network of Bramabiau Cave in Languedoc, France, is located in the Grands Causses. This network comprises 11 km of galleries with difference in level of 100 m (Bruxelles and Bruxelles, 2002).
A : La grotte de Trabuc en Languedoc (France) est située au contact de la dolomie hettangienne et du calcaire sinémurien. Ce réseau comprend 10 km de galeries avec un dénivelé de 200 m (Bruxelles, 1998) ; B : La grotte du Fayt en Ardenne (Belgique) est située dans le calcaire dévonien. Ce réseau comprend 2 km de galeries avec un dénivelé de 50 m ; C : Le réseau Félix-Mazauric de la Grotte de Bramabiau en Languedoc, France, est situé dans les Grands Causses. Ce réseau comprend 11 km de galeries avec un dénivelé de 100 m (Bruxelles et Bruxelles, 2002).

4.2. Cavity shapes in ghostrock karstification

35Cavities from ghostrock karstification can be at three development stages: (i) filled with their alterite; (ii) emptied of their alterite but with no subsequent development of the cavity; (iii) emptied of their alterite with a subsequent hydrological development of the cavity that has modified or erased the inherited shape of the ghostrock.

36When the alterite is still in place, it is difficult to get a 3D view of the ghostrock. The morphology description is thus based on the 2D sections. For the cavities emptied of their alterite, it is not always easy to collect evidences for its ghostrock origin. The best is to find remaining alterite in some locations in the system. As for general karst morphologies, ghostrock cavities can have a horizontal or/and vertical extension. The cavities presented here constitute a non-exhaustive list of karst features where ghostrock karstification has been observed.

4.2.1. Horizontal features

37Quentin Cave is a cave discovered in Nocarcentre Quarry (Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium). The dewatering of the quarry has caused the lowering of the water table. During 50 years of mining, regressive erosion of the alterite has excavated a network of galleries with a total length about 100 m (Quinif and Maire, 2010). This cave has developed on two subvertical fractures sets; therefore, the galleries have cross-sections higher than large. The wall morphologies present horizontal notches and ceiling pockets. The water stream responsible of the erosion of the alterite sprang directly from it (fig. 17). In two months, a new lower level of galleries has been opened by the river, with the drying of the upper galleries.

Fig. 17 - Quentin Cave in Nocarcentre Quarry, Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium (from Quinif and Maire, 2010).
Fig. 17 - Grotte Quentin dans la carrière de Nocarcentre, Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique (d'après Quinif et Maire, 2010).

Fig. 17 - Quentin Cave in Nocarcentre Quarry, Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium (from Quinif and Maire, 2010).Fig. 17 - Grotte Quentin dans la carrière de Nocarcentre, Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique (d'après Quinif et Maire, 2010).

A-B: Galleries of the cave; C: End of the gallery, the water spring out of the alterite; D: Map of the cave. 1. Rock slide. 2. River. 3. Fine sediments (reworked alterite). 4. Vault cupola. 5a. escarpment. 5b. Quarry wall.
A-B : Galeries de la grotte ; C : Au bout de la galerie, l'eau jaillit de l'altérite ; D : Plan de la grotte. 1. Pente. 2. Rivière. 3. Sédiments fins (altérite remaniée). 4. Coupole de voûte. 5a. Escarpement. 5b. Paroi de la carrière.

38La Fuie Cave, Chasseneuil (Charente, France), is a ghostrock cave where the alterite is still partly present. There are the seasonal variations of the water table level that cause its erosion (Dandurand and Maire, 2011). The slow erosion of the alterite along the walls is monitored. The weathering has formed ellipsoidal galleries (fig. 18). Numerous levels of beds of cherts are present in this limestone. They also suffered weathering, which has weakened their structure, making them brittle.

Fig. 18 - La Fuie Cave in Chasseneuil, Charente, France.
Fig. 18 - Grotte de la Fuie à Chasseneuil, Charente, France.

Fig. 18 - La Fuie Cave in Chasseneuil, Charente, France.Fig. 18 - Grotte de la Fuie à Chasseneuil, Charente, France.

A-B: Galleries of the cave. Beds of weathered cherts are left in positive relief by the erosion of the alterite; C: Map of the cave (Dandurand, 2011; Dandurand and Maire, 2011). 1. Sinkhole; 2. Hopper – Fontis; 3. Channel; 4. Flow direction; 5. Collapse blocks; D: Slice in a weathered chert; a-slightly weathered zone; b-moderately weathered zone; c-highly weathered zone; E: Microscopic study of the weathered chert. On the perimeter there is a border of iron oxides.
A-B : Galeries de la grotte. Des lits de cherts altérés sont laissés en relief par l'érosion de l'altérite ; C : Plan de la grotte (Dandurand, 2011 ; Dandurand et Maire, 2011) ; 1. Doline ; 2. Trémie – Fontis ; 3. Chenal ; 4. Sens de l'écoulement ; 5. Blocs éboulés ; D : Lame dans un chert altéré ; une zone légèrement altérée ; b- Zone modérément altérée ; c- Zone fortement altérée ; E : Étude microscopique du chert altéré. Sur le périmètre, il y a une bordure d'oxydes de fer.

39The Barrique Hole, Saint Martin du Puy (Aquitaine, France), is a cave whose origins is a ghostrock network (Lans, 2014; Lans et al., 2006). It is a loss-resurgence karst system with 3 main losses and a resurgence linked by a principal meandering gallery (fig. 19). In enclosed places where mechanical erosion by the water flow was less pronounced, there is remaining alterite. The initial ghostrock was ellipsoidal shaped along the stratification. The initial permeability is constituted by higher porosity zones due to the low diagenetic process. This gallery makes the connection between resurgence, opened in the valley, and a swallow hole in the molassic overburden. After the partial erosion of the alterite, the gallery has evolved and was overdeepened by torrential stream with potholes (Dubois et al., 2011; Lans et al., 2006).

Fig. 19 - La Barrique Hole in Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France (Lans et al., 2006).
Fig. 19 - Trou de la Barrique à Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France (Lans et al., 2006).

Fig. 19 - La Barrique Hole in Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France (Lans et al., 2006).Fig. 19 - Trou de la Barrique à Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France (Lans et al., 2006).

A: Gallery in the cave; B: Map of the cave; 1. Major faults. 2. Areas with lot of speleothems.
A : Galerie dans la grotte. B : Plan de la grotte. 1. Failles majeures. 2. Zones avec beaucoup de spéléothèmes.

40Bucco della Volpe Cave, Monte Bisbino (Lago di Como, Italia), shows weathered strata and vertical joints. The western side of the lake is entirely composed of Moltrasio limestone from the Lower Lias. This is a well stratified dark grey limestone with flint nodules and interbedded with clays and marls. At present times, this cave constitutes the resurgence of the waters from Monte Bisbino karst fig. 20). Other cavities in the mountain (Grotta dell’Alpe Madrona and Zocca d’Ass) have revealed many ghostrocks. The altitude of the resurgence corresponds to the lowest level of ghostrock karstification (Tognini, 1999).

Fig. 20 - A cross-section through Monte Bisbino, Lombardy (Italy) showing the three main cave systems resulting from ghostrock karstification (Dubois et al., 2014a).
Fig. 20 - Coupe transversale du Monte Bisbino, Lombardie (Italie) montrant les trois principaux systèmes de grottes résultant de la karstification par fantômisation (Dubois et al., 2014a).

Fig. 20 - A cross-section through Monte Bisbino, Lombardy (Italy) showing the three main cave systems resulting from ghostrock karstification (Dubois et al., 2014a).Fig. 20 - Coupe transversale du Monte Bisbino, Lombardie (Italie) montrant les trois principaux systèmes de grottes résultant de la karstification par fantômisation (Dubois et al., 2014a).

A: Bucco della Volpe; B: Grotta dell “Alpe Madrona”; C: Zocca d'Ass. The karst systems have developed above the limit of ghostrock weathering as depicted by the dotted line.
A : Bucco della Volpe ; B : Grotta dell « Alpe Madrona » ; C : Zocca d'Ass. Les systèmes karstiques se sont développés au-dessus de la limite d'altération de la fantômisation, comme illustré par la ligne pointillée.

4.2.2. Vertical features

41Pits, wells and shafts come from the emptying of vertical and subvertical ghostrock features that developed mainly on vertical joints. In some cases, these wells are intersected by the topography, and they are used to access the karst system. Vertical wells also make links between different gallery levels in the systems, but with no hydrogeological structure. In many cases, wells from ghosts-rock features are blind chimneys and end on squeezes at their top and bottom.

42In the area of Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium), the emptying of ghostrock features was activated by the artificial lowering of the water table due to the mining exploitation of quarries (Kaufmann and Quinif, 1999; Vergari et al., 1995). This led to the creation of collapse sinkholes such as the Gi Hole (fig. 21-22) (Quinif and Rorive, 1990). Wells are also to be found when cut in the quarries and their walls have benches following the bedding.

Fig. 21 - Collapse sinkholes, Gaurain-Ramecroix near Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium).
Fig. 21 - Gouffres d'effondrement, Gaurain-Ramecroix près de Tournai (Hainaut, Belgique).

Fig. 21 - Collapse sinkholes, Gaurain-Ramecroix near Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium).Fig. 21 - Gouffres d'effondrement, Gaurain-Ramecroix près de Tournai (Hainaut, Belgique).

Sinkhole opened by the lowering of the water table due to the mining of quarries and water exploitation (A and B). The limestone lies under a thick overburden.
Gouffre ouvert par l'abaissement de la surface piézométrique dû au creusement des carrières et à l'exploitation de l'eau (A et B). Le calcaire repose sous des formations de couverture.

Fig. 22 - Gi Hole in Gaurain-Ramecroix near Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium).
Fig. 22 - Trou Gi à Gaurain-Ramecroix près de Tournai (Hainaut, Belgique).

Fig. 22 - Gi Hole in Gaurain-Ramecroix near Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium).Fig. 22 - Trou Gi à Gaurain-Ramecroix près de Tournai (Hainaut, Belgique).

The cavity is part of an emptied ghost corridor. The void has been created by compaction of the alterite due to the lowering of the water table. A-B: Sinkhole in a field; C: The walls of the cave show lateral benches; D: Cross section of the pit. From the bottom to the top of the section, we have Carboniferous limestones, Cretaceous marls, Thanetian sands and soil.
La cavité fait partie d'un couloir fantôme vidé. Le vide a été créé par compactage de l'altérite dû à l'abaissement de la surface piézométrique. A-B : Gouffre dans un champ ; C : Les parois de la grotte présentent des banquettes latérales ; D : Coupe transversale du puits. Du bas vers le haut de la coupe, nous avons des calcaires carbonifères, des marnes crétacées, des sables thanétien et le sol.

43In the Valle Imagna (Alps, Italy), there are many caves presenting numerous dead-end chimneys (fig. 23A). Several outcrops near those caves, exhibit ghostrock features such as vertical corridors whose walls are carved of horizontal grooves and features from differential dissolution (fig. 23 B and C). These cavities are ghost-endokarst partially emptied.

Fig. 23 - Val Imagna, Alps, Italy.
Fig. 23 - Val Imagna, Alpes, Italie.

Fig. 23 - Val Imagna, Alps, Italy.Fig. 23 - Val Imagna, Alpes, Italie.

A: Cross-section of the Bus de la Siberia Cave. This cavity results from the emptying of a ghostrock network. It presents numerous blind pits; B: Outcrops of ghostrocks corridors; C: Side wall of a vertical ghost-corridor.
A : Coupe transversale de la grotte du Bus de la Siberia. Cette cavité résulte de la vidange d'un réseau de fantômes de roche. Il présente de nombreuses puits aveugles ; B : Affleurements de couloirs fantômes ; C : Paroi latérale d'un couloir fantôme vertical.

44In the Causses Plateaus (Midi-Pyrénées and Languedoc, France), occurrences of ghostrock karstification have been shown (Bruxelles, 2002; Bruxelles and Bruxelles, 2002). A lot of vertical pits (Abîme de Rabanel or Aven Armand) can also be interpreted like ghostrock (fig. 24). From a general point of view, all those cavities could be reinterpreted as ghostrock.

Fig. 24 - Trabuc Cave, Gard, France.
Fig. 24 - Grotte de Trabuc, Gard, France.

Fig. 24 - Trabuc Cave, Gard, France.Fig. 24 - Grotte de Trabuc, Gard, France.

A: Map of the cave organized on 2 fracture sets; B: Great gallery on an initial ghostrock corridor; C: Junction between two great galleries; D: Cupolas resulting from the ghostrock process.
A : Plan de la grotte organisé sur 2 jeux de fractures ; B : Grande galerie sur un premier couloir fantôme ; C : Jonction entre deux grandes galeries ; D : Coupoles résultant de la fantômisation.

4.2.2. Rooms

45In La Rochefoucauld karst system (Charente, France), ghostrocks morphologies consist in galleries locally enlarged to become rooms by the collapse of the roof. Fallen blocks and sandy-clayed sediments fill partially the voids resulting from the erosion of alterite (Dandurand, 2011; Dandurand and Maire, 2011; Dandurand et al., 2014).

46In Han-sur-Lesse Cave systems (Namur, Belgium), it has been demonstrated that the chambers were created by ghostrock karstification as remaining alterites were found on weathered strata at the top of the chambers (fig. 25). In a side network (Père Noël Cave), chambers come from the coalescence of emptied parallel ghostrock galleries whose separating walls have collapse. In the dell ‘Alpe Madrona Cave (Alps, Italy), chambers are the result of the collapse of overlapping and intersecting emptied ghost-galleries.

Fig. 25 - Weathered stratum at the top of the Antiparos Room, Han-sur-Lesse Cave, Namur (Belgium).
Fig. 25 - Strate altérée au sommet de la salle d’Antiparos, Grotte de Han-sur-Lesse, Namur (Belgique).

Fig. 25 - Weathered stratum at the top of the Antiparos Room, Han-sur-Lesse Cave, Namur (Belgium).Fig. 25 - Strate altérée au sommet de la salle d’Antiparos, Grotte de Han-sur-Lesse, Namur (Belgique).

The alterite appears darker behind the hammer. The micritic cement of the fossils is dissolved highlighting the sparitic parts.
L'altérite apparaît plus foncée derrière le marteau. Le ciment micritique des fossiles est dissous mettant en évidence les parties sparitiques.

4.3. Parietal microforms in ghostrock karstification

47Parietal microforms can be classified into two categories: (i) microforms ones that can form with the alterite still filling the feature; and (ii) microforms that may only be formed when the alterite is evacuated. The firsts are the actual ghost-microforms, with the shaping of the rock walls while in contact with the alterite. When the alterite is removed, these features are similar to that attributed to karstification by total removal (fig. 26). The second develop once the alterite has been removed and a river flows in the cavity.

Fig. 26 - Parietal microforms in Piquepoche Quarry, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).
Fig. 26 - Microformes pariétales de la carrière Piquepoche, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).

Fig. 26 - Parietal microforms in Piquepoche Quarry, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).Fig. 26 - Microformes pariétales de la carrière Piquepoche, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).

A: Ghostrock feature partially emptied of its alterite due to the quarrying, anastomosis and pendants are visible; B: Limestone block that previously was a wall of a ghostrock with anastomosis and pendants. Without the presence of alterite, it is not possible to determine the karst process that led to the creation these forms.
A : Forme issue de fantôme de roche partiellement vidée de son altérite en raison de l'extraction, des anastomoses et des pendentifs sont visibles ; B : Bloc de calcaire qui était auparavant un mur de fantôme de roche avec anastomoses et pendants. Sans la présence d'altérite, il n'est pas possible de déterminer le processus karstique qui a conduit à la création de ces formes.

4.3.1. Ghost-microforms

48Ceiling pocket and domes. Ghostrock features can present ceiling pockets and domes on their walls in contact with the alterite (fig. 27A). These microforms can have diameters ranging between 10 cm to a few meters. As for karstification by total removal, they come from the lateral weathering of the bedrock from a central point. The shape is determined by the heterogeneity of the initial rock.

49Notches and projections. Ghostrock features can evolve laterally from an initial zone in the rock. According to the differences in the rock properties, the weathering can spread differentially in a non-homogeneous way creating notches and projections in the walls (fig. 27B).

50Differential dissolution features. The fragile features which appear in relief from a cave wall have been always interpreted as phreatic features, created with a very low flow. However, these stone laces are common in ghostrocks features (fig. 27C). Therefore, they cannot be used to determine the speleogenetic process. The stone laces can result from different causes leading to the differential dissolution of the rock: tension gashes filled with calcite, clayed or silica-rich strata, fossils, cherts, etc., depending on the lithology of the limestone. They are revealed after the emptying of the alterite.

51Anastomoses and pendants. Anastomoses are often associated to the karstification by total removal of the walls of the gallery above fluvial deposits, but they can also develop in ghostrock features where the filling material is the alterite (fig. 27D).

Fig. 27 - Parietal microforms observed in ghostrock features.
Fig. 27 - Microformes pariétales observées dans les fantômes de roche.

Fig. 27 - Parietal microforms observed in ghostrock features.Fig. 27 - Microformes pariétales observées dans les fantômes de roche.

A: Ceiling pocket, Clypot Quarry, Soignies (Hainaut, Belgium); B: Notches and projections, Hainaut Quarry, Soignies (Hainaut, Belgium); C: Calcite vein highlighted by the differential dissolution, Milieu Quarry, Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium); D: Anastomosis and pendants, Piquepoche Quarry, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).
A : Coupoles, Carrière du Clypot, Soignies (Hainaut, Belgique) ; B : Banquettes latérales, Carrière du Hainaut, Soignies (Hainaut, Belgique) ; C : Veine de calcite mise en évidence par la dissolution différentielle, Carrière du Milieu, Tournai (Hainaut, Belgique) ; D : Anastomose et pendants, Carrière Piquepoche, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).

4.3.2. Microforms from fluvial evolution of ghost-rock features

52Every feature previously classified as created by a river flow can affect a ghost-rock cavity when it has been emptied: e.g., potholes, overdeepenings, scallops, parietal clints, vertical flutes, meander niches. These features are evidently associated to fluvial erosion in a gallery, but they do not allow to make an interpretation on the process that had led to the creation of the cavity: total removal karst or emptied ghost-rock feature. We have to keep in mind that a parietal microform is a witness of only the last erosion process.

53Figure 28 shows a ghost-rock gallery emptied of its alterite (Dubois et al., 2011). Relicts of the alterite are preserved in the upper part of the gallery. Two hypotheses can be made to explain the evolution of the gallery. (i) A void developed at the top of the section from a joint along a weathered stratum (fig. 28B). The subsequent fluvial evolution shaped the fresh rock with overdeepening and benches. (ii) The whole cavity was entirely pre-shaped as a ghost -rock feature and the subsequent fluvial evolution resulted in the emptying of the alterite (fig. 28C). Even if the two hypotheses are possible, the first one is more probable. It is more likely that the weathering developed from a horizontal joint in the upper strata. Moreover, the upper part of the gallery shows a different morphology compared to the lower part. Indeed, the shape of the walls in the lower part shows characteristic morphologies that result from the erosion by a turbulent stream. It is likely that the bottom of the gallery was reshaped by fluvial flow.

Fig. 28 - The Barrique Hole, Saint Martin du Puy (Aquitaine, France).
Fig. 28 - Trou de la barrique, Saint Martin du Puy (Aquitaine, France).

Fig. 28 - The Barrique Hole, Saint Martin du Puy (Aquitaine, France).Fig. 28 - Trou de la barrique, Saint Martin du Puy (Aquitaine, France).

A: Ghost-rock gallery emptied of its alterite with a subsequent hydrological development of the cavity (Dubois et al., 2011). Overdeepenings and potholes are visible on the walls and on the ground of the cavity. 1. Fresh rock; 2. Alterite; 3. Void. Two hypotheses of evolution: the void at the top of the section developed along a weathered stratum and a subsequent fluvial evolution shaped the overdeepening and benches (B); The whole cavity was entirely shaped by ghost-rock karstification and the free flow in open cavity resulted in the removal of the alterite (C).
A : Galerie issue de fantôme de roche, vidée de son altérite avec un surcreusement fluviatile ultérieur (Dubois et al., 2011). Un surcreusement et des marmites de géant sont visibles sur les parois et sur le sol de la cavité. 1. Roche fraîche ; 2. Altérite ; 3. Vide. Deux hypothèses d'évolution : le vide au sommet de la coupe s'est développé le long d'une strate altérée et une évolution fluviale postérieure a façonné le surcreusement et les banquettes (B) ; L'ensemble de la cavité a été entièrement façonné par la karstification de type fantôme et l'écoulement libre dans le fantôme de roche a entraîné l'élimination de l'altérite (C).

5. Discussion

54An extensive literature discusses the relationship between cave patterns, cavity shapes, parietal microforms and their possible origin. Yet, these genetic conclusions are often drawn only regarding in situ observation and theoretical speculations without comparative experimental analysis. From these conclusions, scientists erroneously consider that this origin is the only one that can shape of this morphology, and when they encountered them in cave, they consequentially deduct the origin. However, we demonstrated in this paper that the origin of cave morphologies is rarely unique, except maybe for scallops and potholes.

55Ghostrock karst are geological objective features when the residual alterite is still unremoved. When microforms are observed in ghostrock in direct contact with the alterite, it then becomes obvious that they result from the in-situ weathering of the limestone. So, in the cases, the only origin possible for these morphologies is the ghostrock karstification. On the other hand, when microforms are found in open conduits, it is therefore no more possible to assume the origin based solely on their morphologies, because it can both come from: karstification by total removal, ghostrock karstification or subsequent evolution of a previous conduit. To deduce the origin of the conduit, it is then necessary to consider the global geological context as well as all morphologies apparent in the cave.

6. Conclusion

56This paper is divided in two main parts. The first one focuses on a descriptive presentation of the karst morphologies, from the cave pattern to the parietal microforms through cavity shapes. The second one places these morphologies in the ghostrock karstification context. It was demonstrated how ghostrock karstification preferentially leads to the creation of labyrinthine network and anastomotic patterns. The ghostrock conduits can develop both in horizontal and vertical extensions and can create rooms at the crossing of several features. Parietal microforms have specifically been observed in ghostrock features: ceiling pocket, dome, notch, projection, differential dissolution feature, anastomose and pendant. Finally, when emptied of the residual alterite, the feature can evolve as any cavity and can show parietal forms of fluvial flows: potholes, overdeepenings, scallops, parietal clints, vertical flutes, meander niches, etc.

57By analysing microforms in ghostrock features, it has been shown that karst morphologies can have multiple causes and that it is no more possible to deduce the origins of caves only thanks to the observation of the features. This requires us to revise interpretations of the origins of caves from the observed morphologies.

Corresponding author: +32 (0)65374603
yves.quinif@umons.ac.be (Y. Quinif)

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Allen J.R.L. (1972) - On the origin of cave flutes and scallops by the enlargement of inhomogeneities. Rassegna Speleologica Italiana, 24, 1–19.

Audra P., Bini A., Gabrovšek F., Häuselmann P., Hobléa F., Jeannin P.-Y., Kunaver J., Monbaron M., Šušteršič F., Tognini P., Trimmel H., Wildberger A. (2007) - Cave and karst evolution in the Alps and their relation to paleoclimate and paleotopography. Acta Carsologia, 36, 53–68.

Baele J.-M., Papier S., Barriquand L., Barriquand J. (2011) - Insights into the use of cathodoluminescence for bone taphonomy in the fossil bear deposit of Azé Cave, Saône-et-Loire, France. Quaternaire, Supplement 4, 291–296.

Barton H.A., Spear J.R., Pace N.R. (2001) - Microbial life in the underworld: biogenicity in secondary mineral formations. Geomicrobiology Journal, 18, 359–368.

DOI : 10.1080/01490450152467840.

Bates R.L. (1980) - Glossary of Geology, 2nd Ed. ed. American Geological Institute, Falls Church, Va.

Bini A. (2007) - Morphologie et genèse de quelques types de coupoles. In : Actes de La 17ème Rencontre d’Octobre - Orgnac 2007, 37–45.

Bini A. (1980) - Appunti di geomorfologia ipogea : le forme parietali, in : Atti del V Convegno di Speleologia del Trentino Alto Agige, 1978, 19–46.

Bini A. (1979) - I canali di volta. Speleologia, 1, 30–40.

Bini A. (1978) - Appunti di geomorphologia ipogea : le forme parietali. In : Atti del V Convegno di Speleologia del Trentino Alto Agige, 1978. Lavis.

Bini A., Cappa G. (1978) - Considerazioni sulla morfologia delle cupole. Quaderni Museo Speleologico, 4, 47–62.

Bini A., Zuccoli L., Quinif Y. (2012) - Karst et fantômisation dans la dolomie de la Valle Imagna (Bergamo, Italie). Karstologia, 60, 1–10.

Bögli A. (1964) - Corrosion par mélange des eaux. International Journal of Speleology, 1, 61–70.

Bögli A. (1980) - Karst Hydrology and Physical Speleology. Springer-Verlag, New York. 284p.

Bretz J.H. (1949) - Carlsbad Caverns and other caves of the Guadalupe block, New Mexico. Journal of Geology, 57, 447–463.

Bretz J.H. (1942) - Vadose and phreatic features of limestone caverns. Journal of Geology, 675–811.

Bruxelles L. (2002) - Reconstitution morphologique du Causse du Larzac : rôle des formations superficielles dans la morphogenèse karstique. Karstologia, 38, 15–28.

Bruxelles L. (1998) - Karsts et paléokarsts du Bassin de Mialet (Bordure Cévenole, Gard): formation et évolution d’un karst démantelé. Karstologia, 30, 15–24.

Bruxelles L., Bruxelles S. (2002) - La chasse aux fantômes dans les Grands Causses : utilisation d’un nouveau concept de spéléogenèse dans la recherche de cavités. Spelunca, 88, 14–20.

Bruxelles L., Wienin M. (2009) - Les fantômes de roche de la mine de la Grande Vernissière (Fressac, Gard). Premières observations sur l’origine de certains karsts de la bordure cévenole. Karstologia Mémoires n° 17, Actes du colloque AFK - Pierre Saint-Martin 2007, 192-200.

Chevalier P. (1944) - Problèmes et hypothèses d’hydrologie souterraine. Les études rhodiennes, 19, 228–234.

Corbel J. (1962) - Marmites-de-géant, Tinajitas, vagues d’érosion, niches. Spelunca, 2, 34–37.

Curl R.L. (1974) - Deducing flow velocity in cave conduits from scallops. National Speleological Society Bulletin, 36, 1–5.

Curl R.L. (1966) - Scallops and flutes. Transactions of Cave Research Group of Great Britain, 7, 121–160.

Dandurand G. (2011) - Cavités et remplissages de la nappe karstique de Charente (bassin de la Touvre, La Rochefoucauld) : spéléogenèse par fantômisation, archives pléistocène et holocène, rôle de l’effet de site. Thèse de doctorat, Université Bordeaux Montaigne (Bordeaux III), 317 p.

Dandurand G., Dubois C., Maire R., Quinif Y. (2014) - The Charente karst basin of the Touvre: alteration of the Jurassic series and speleogenesis by ghostrock process. Geologica Belgica, 17, 27–32.

Dandurand G., Maire R. (2011) - Essai de typologie des cavités du karst de la Rochefoucauld (Charente) : rôle de la « fantômisation » crétacée, du battement de la nappe et de l’effet de site. Dynamiques Environnementales, 27, 11–28.

Davis W.M. (1930) - Origin of limestone caverns. Geological Society of America Bulletin, 41, 475–628.

Deike G.H.I. (1960) - Origin and Geological Relations of Breathing Cave, Virginia. The National Speleological Society Bulletin, 22, 30–42.

De Joly R. (1946) - L’Aven d’Orgnac (Ardèche). Peladan, Uzès.

Delvigne J.E. (1998) - Atlas of micromorphology of mineral alteration and weathering. The Canadian Mineralogist, 3, 494 p.

Dubois C., Deceuster J., Kaufmann O., Rowberry M.D. (2015) - A new method to quantify carbonate rock weathering. Mathematical Geosciences, 47, 889–935.

DOI :10.1007/s11004-014-9581-7

Dubois C., Lans B., Kaufmann O., Maire R., Quinif Y. (2011) - Karstification de type fantômes de roche en Entre-deux-Mers. Karstologia, 57, 19–27.

Dubois C., Quinif Y., Baele J.-M., Barriquand L., Bini A., Bruxelles L., Dandurand G., Havron C., Kaufmann O., Lans B., Maire R., Martin J., Rodet J., Rowberry M.D., Tognini P., Vergari A. (2014a) - The process of ghostrock karstification and its role in the formation of cave systems. Earth-Science Reviews, 131, 116–148.

DOI:10.1016/j.earscirev.2014.01.006

Dubois, C., Quinif Y., Baele J.-M., Dagrain F., Deceuster J., Kaufmann O. (2014b) - The evolution of the mineralogical and petrophysical properties of a weathered limestone in southern Belgium. Geologica Belgica, 17, 1–8.

Egemeier S.J. (1981) - Cavern development by thermal waters. National Speleological Society Bulletin, 43, 31–51.

Ewers R.O. (1966) - Bedding plane anastomoses and their relation to cavern passages. Bulletin of the National Speleological Society, 28, 133–140.

Ford D., Williams P.W. (2007) - Karst hydrogeology and geomorphology. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, UK. 562p.

Ford T.D., Cullingford C.H.D. (1976) - The Science of Speleology. Academic Press, London. 593p.

Gèze B. (1973) - Lexique des termes français de spéléologie physique et karstologique. Ann. Spéléol., 28, 1–20.

Gèze B. (1965) - La spéléologie scientifique, Edition du Seuil, Paris. 192p.

Havron C., Baele J.-M., Quinif Y. (2007) - Pétrographie d’une altérite résiduelle de type fantôme de roche. Karstologia, 49, 25–32.

Jackson J.A. (1997) - Glossary of Geology, 4th ed. American Geological Institute, Alexandria, Va.

Jakucs L. (1977) - Morphogenetics of karst regions. Variants of karst evolution, Adam Hilger, Bristol. 252 p.

Jennings J.N., (1971) - Karst. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, Cambridge, MA. 284 p.

Kaufmann O. (2000) - Les effondrements karstiques du Tournaisis (Thèse de doctorat). Faculté Polytechnique de Mons, Mons, Belgique.

Kaufmann O., Bini A., Tognini P., Quinif Y. (1999) - Etude microscopique d'une altérite de type fantôme de roche, Etudes de géographie physique. Travaux 1999 - Suppl. XXVIII, Cagep, Université de Provence, 129-134.

Kaufmann O., Quinif, Y. (1999) - Cover-collapse sinkholes in the “Tournaisis” area, southern Belgium. Engineering Geology, 52, 15–22.

DOI : 10.1016/S0013-7952(98)00050-7.

Klimchouk A. B. (2007) - Hypogene Speleogenesis: Hydrogeological and Morphogenetic Perspective. Special Paper no. 1, National Cave and Karst Research Institute, Carlsbad, NM, 106 p.

Lans B. (2014) - Genèse des systèmes karstiques de Gironde (Entre-deux-mers et Graves) : rôle de la "fantômisation" et du potentiel hydrodynamique dans les calcaires oligocènes, crétacés et miocènes. Thèse de doctorat. Université Bordeaux Montaigne (Bordeaux III).

Lans B., Maire R., Ortega R., Deves G., Bacquart T., Plaisir C., Quinif Y., Perrette Y. (2006) - Les stalagmites du réseau du Trou Noir (Gironde) : rôle de l’effet de site dans l’enregistrement du signal climatique et environnemental. Karstologia, 48, 1–22.

Lismonde B., Lagmani A. (1987) - Les vagues d’érosion. Karstologia, 10, 33–38.

Mangin A. (1974, 1975) - Contribution à l'étude hydrodynamique des aquifères karstiques : Première partie : Généralités sur le karst et les lois d'écoulement utilisées. Annales de Spéléologie, 1974, 29, 3, 283-332. Deuxième partie : Concepts méthodologiques adoptés. Systèmes karstiques étudiés. Annales de Spéléologie, 1974, 29, 4, 495-601. Troisième partie : Constitution et fonctionnement des aquifères karstiques. Annales de Spéléologie, 1975, 30, 1, 21-124.

Martel E.-A. (1894) - Les Abîmes : les Eaux Souterraines, les Cavernes, les Sources, la Spéléologie : Explorations Souterraines Effectuées de 1888 à 1893 en France, Belgique, Autriche et Grèce. Delagrave, Paris.

Northup D.E., Dahm C.N., Melim L.A., Spilde M.N., Crossey L.J., Lavoi K.H., Mallory L.M., Boston P.J., Cunningham K.I., Barns S.M. (2000) - Evidence for geomicrobiological interactions in Guadalupe Caves. Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, 62, 80–89.

Palmer A.N. (1991) - Origin and morphology of limestone caves. Geological Society of America Bulletin, 103, 1–21.

DOI : 10.1130/0016-7606(1991)103<0001:OAMOLC>2.3.CO;2.

Papier S., Baele J.-M., Gillan D., Barriquand L., Barriquand J. (2011) - Manganese geomicrobiology of the black deposits from the Azé Cave, Saône-et-Loire, France. Quaternaire, Supplement 4, 297–305.

Prigogine I. (2017) - Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics. Dover Books on Physics, 336 p.

Quinif Y. (1973) - Contribution à l’étude morphologique des coupoles. Annales de Spéléologie, 28, 565–573.

Quinif Y. (1975) - Un site karstique remarquable de l'Est-Algérien : le Djebel Sidi R'Gheiss. Actes du 5ème Congrès National de Spéléologie (Suisse) (1974). Suppl. 9 à Stalactite, 191-197.

Quinif Y. (1977) - La Damous Fedjoudj (Algérie de l’Est): topographie et morphologie. Spelunca, 2, 53–56.

Quinif Y. (1978) - La grotte de l'Obstination ou de la Vilaine Source et le réseau des Lesves-Arbre (Belgique). Spelunca, 4 : 146-150.

Quinif Y. (1982) - La grotte de Fréyr ; un témoin de la paléohydrogéologie dans le Dinantien. Revue Belge de Géographie, 106, 19–29.

Quinif Y. (1984) - Le karst du Gunung Sewu - Java. Spelunca, 14, 18–24.

Quinif Y. (1985) - Une morphologie karstique typique en zone intertropicale : les karsts du Bas-Zaïre. Karstologia, 43–52.

Quinif Y. (1998) - Dissipation d’énergie et adaptabilité dans les systèmes karstiques. Karstologia, 31, 1–11.

Quinif Y. (2010) - Fantômes de roche et fantômisation – Essai sur un nouveau paradigme en karstogenèse. Karstologia Mémoires, 18, 196 p.

Quinif Y., Baele J.-M., Deschuyteneer D., Gline S. (2012) - Fantômisation d’une galerie à remplissage fluviatile (Carrière de Gauthier-Wincqz, Soignies, Belgique). Karstologia, 59, 15–28.

Quinif Y., Baele J.-M., Dubois C., Havron C., Kaufmann O., Vergari A. (2014) - Fantômisation : un nouveau paradigme entre la théorie des deux phases de Davis et la théorie de la biorhexistasie d’Erhart. Geologica Belgica, 17, 66–74.

Quinif Y., Bastin B. (1984) - Topographie de la Salle du Dôme. Spéléo Flash, 145, 7–12.

Quinif Y., Bruxelles L. (2011) - Ghost rock’ weathering: Processes, evolution and implications for the karstification. Géomorphologie : Relief, Processus, Environnement, 17 (4), 349–358.

DOI : 10.4000/geomorphologie.9555

Quinif Y., Maire R. (2010) - La Grotte Quentin (Hainaut, Belgique) : un modèle évolution des fantômes de roche. Karstologia Mémoires, 17, 214–218.

Quinif Y., Meon H., Yans J. (2006) - Nature and dating of karstic filling in the Hainaut Province (Belgium). Karstic, geodynamic and paleogeographic implications. Geodinamica Acta, 19, 73–85.

Quinif Y., Quinif G. (2002) - Méthodes et éléments de cartographie d’un paléokarst : l’exemple de la Carrière du Clypot (Hainaut, Belgique). Karstologia, 39, 1–8.

Quinif Y., Rorive A. (1990) - Nouvelles données sur le karst du Tournaisis. Bulletin de la Société Belge de Géologie, 99, 361–372.

Quinif Y., Vandycke S., Vergari A. (1997) - Karstification and brittle structures. The Cretaceous paleokarsts of Hainaut (Belgium): a case study. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, 168, 463–472.

Quinif Y., Vergari A., Doremus P., Hennebert M., Charlet J.-M. (1993) - Phénomènes karstiques affectant le calcaire du Hainaut. Bulletin de la Société Belge de Géologie, 102, 379–394.

Renault P. (1958) - Eléments de spéléomorphologie karstique. Annales de Spéléologie, 13, 23–48.

Renault P. (1967) - Contribution à l’étude des actions mécaniques et sédimentologiques dans la spéléogenèse. Annales de Spéléologie, 22, 5–17, 209–267.

Renault P. (1968) - Contribution à l’étude des actions mécaniques et sédimentologiques dans la spéléogenèse. Annales de Spéléologie, 28, 529–596.

Renault P. (1970) - La formation des cavernes, Presses Universitaires de France. Edit. Que sais-je ? 128 p.

Renault P., Caumartin V. (1958) - La corrosion biochimique dans un réseau karstique et la genèse du mondmilch. Notes biospéléologiques, 13, 87–109.

Roques H., Ek C. (1973) - Etude expérimentale de la dissolution des calcaires par une eau chargée de CO2. Annales de Spéléologie, 28, 549–563.

Salomon J.-N. (2006) - Précis de Karstologie. Presses Universitaires de Bordeaux, Pessac. 289 p.

Slabe T. (1995) - Cave rocky relief and its speleogenetical significance, Zbirka ZRC. Znanstvenoraziskovalni Center SAZU, Ljubljana. 128 p.

Tognini P. (1999) - Individuazione in un nuovo processo speleogenetico: il carsismo del M. Bisbino (Lago di Como), Ph.D. Thesis, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan. 427 p.

Trombe F. (1952) - Traité de spéléologie. Edit. Payot Paris, 376 p.

Vandycke S., Quinif Y. (1999) - Tectonique, contraintes et karst : implications génétiques. Etudes de géographie physique, Travaux 1999 - Suppl. XXVIII, Cagep, Université de Provence, 199-204.

Vandycke S., Quinif Y. (2001) - Recent active faults in Belgian Ardenne revealed in Rochefort Karstic network (Namur Province, Belgium). Geologie en Mijnbouw, 80, 279–304

Vergari A. (1996) - Contraintes paléokarstiques dans l’exploitation du calcaire carbonifère sur le bord nord du Synclinorium de Namur en Hainaut occidental. Thèse de doctorat, Faculté Polytechnique de Mons, 276 p.

Vergari A. (1998) - Nouveau regard sur la spéléogenèse : le “pseudo-endokarst” du Tournaisis (Hainaut, Belgique). Karstologia, 31, 12–18.

Vergari A., Quinif Y., Charlet J.M. (1995) - Paleokarstic features in the Belgian carboniferous limestones - implications to engineering. Karst geohazards: engineering and environmental problems in karst terrane. Proceedings of the 5th conference, Gatlinburg 1995, 481–486.

Viala C. (2000) - Dictionnaire de la spéléologie. Spelunca Librairie, 254 p.

Viehmann J. (1973) - Essai de classification des formes souterraines des grottes, in: Actes Du VI Congrès International de Spéléologie, Olomouc 1973, 289–293.

Viehmann J. (1959) - Contribution à la connaissance de la genèse des marmites. Speleologia, Varsovie 1, 145–175.

White W.B. (1988) - Geomorphology and Hydrology of Karst Terrains. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 464 p.

Haut de page

Annexe

Version française abrégée

La spéléogenèse repose en partie sur l’interprétation des formes et microformes karstiques. Les chercheurs ont établi des relations causales entre la nature, les caractéristiques et la disposition des formes et microformes karstiques et les causes génétiques. Il est symptomatique de remarquer que ces relations causales ont été établies souvent sur base d’analogies. On fait implicitement des hypothèses telles que l’enfoncement gravitaire de l’eau courante. Quelques rares cas ont été modélisés en laboratoire en modèles analogiques ou physiques, comme les coups de gouge. La découverte du concept de fantôme de roche et de karstification par fantômisation a modifié cette méthodologie. Ce nouveau paradigme de karstification est fondé sur l’étude de paléokarsts dans lesquels les formes sont indiscutablement issues de ce type de karstogenèse. Cela modifie complètement les vues que l’on pouvait avoir sur la genèse des formes et microformes endokarstiques, telles les coupoles, les puits et les salles.

Cet article se propose d’examiner les formes les plus courantes à la lumière de ce nouveau paradigme et d’en faire le constat spéléogénétique. Nous commencerons par l’examen des formes et microformes les plus importantes avec leur explication génétique classique. Un résumé du paradigme de la karstification par fantômisation s’impose alors pour fixer le cadre de référence de notre réflexion. Enfin, nous décrirons les formes observées en fantômes de roche. Nous terminerons par l’examen des formes issues de la fantômisation, en les comparant aux formes classiquement interprétées comme issues de la karstification par enlèvement total.

Sont d’abord résumés les concepts de karstification par enlèvement total (théories « classiques ») et par fantômisation. Vient ensuite une description sommaire des différentes formes souterraines, depuis les réseaux kilométriques jusqu’aux microformes centimétriques. Par après, les formes visibles sans ambiguïté dans les fantômes de roche sont passées en revue. Leur puissance déductive vient de ce que ces formes sont visibles dans le cadre de leur genèse : les paléokarsts montrent ces formes avec leur altérite résiduelle toujours en place et excluent de ce fait une autre origine. Les fantômes de roche sont examinés dans le cadre de leur genèse en insistant sur la perméabilité initiale, les différentes sources d’acidité et les formes résultantes. Ces formes sont mises en parallèles avec celles décrites dans le concept classique en prenant assise sur des exemples provenant de la fantômisation. Enfin, la suite de l’évolution des fantômes de roche est abordée avec notamment l’évolution fluviatile. L’article se termine par une discussion critique mettant en évidence les problèmes posés par la fantômisation dans le cadre de la karstogenèse.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre Fig. 1 - The two processes of karstification (after Dubois et al., 2014a).Fig. 1 - Les deux processus de karstification (d’après Dubois et al., 2014a).
Légende A: Karstification by total removal requires a considerable amount of chemical energy to dissolve the calcium carbonate as well as a considerable amount of hydrodynamic energy to remove both the dissolved species and undissolved particles. Water must be able to flow through the rock for karstification to occur and preferential pathways are provided by opened joints or emptied galleries resulting from previous karstogenesis; B: ghostrock karstification requires a considerable amount of chemical energy to dissolve the calcium carbonate but only a small amount of hydrodynamic energy to remove the dissolved species while leaving the undissolved particles in place. Preferential pathways are provided by opened joints or more transmissive zones within the rock. The undissolved particles will be removed by the flowing water if the hydrodynamic energy increases sufficiently.A : La karstification par enlèvement total nécessite une quantité considérable d'énergie chimique pour dissoudre le carbonate de calcium ainsi qu'une quantité considérable d'énergie hydrodynamique pour éliminer à la fois les espèces dissoutes et les particules non dissoutes. L'eau doit pouvoir s'écouler à travers la roche pour que la karstification se produise et des voies préférentielles sont fournies par des joints ouverts ou des galeries vidées résultant d'une karstogenèse antérieure ; B : La karstification par fantômisation nécessite une quantité considérable d'énergie chimique pour dissoudre le carbonate de calcium, mais seulement une petite quantité d'énergie hydrodynamique pour éliminer les espèces dissoutes tout en laissant les particules non dissoutes en place. Les voies préférentielles sont fournies par des joints ouverts ou des zones plus transmissives au sein de la roche. Les particules non dissoutes seront éliminées par écoulement de type fluviatile si l'énergie hydrodynamique augmente suffisamment.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-1.png
Fichier image/png, 228k
Titre Fig. 2 - Schematic diagram showing typical ghostrock features (modified from Kaufmann, 2000).Fig. 2 - Schéma montrant les caractéristiques typiques d’un massif fantômisé (modifié à partir de Kaufmann, 2000).
Légende A: Fresh unweathered limestone; B: Large weathered features; C: Weathered corridors; D: Ghost-endokarst; E: Weathered galleries; F: Overburden.A : Calcaire frais non altéré ; B : Grands volumes altérés ; C : Couloirs altérés ; D : Pseudoendokarst (fantômes internes); E : Fantômes en galeries; F : Formations de couverture.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-2.png
Fichier image/png, 108k
Titre Fig. 3 - Examples of ghostrock features in the Carboniferous limestone around Soignies in southern Belgium (after Dubois et al., 2014a).Fig. 3 - Exemples de formations fantômes dans le calcaire carbonifère autour de Soignies dans le sud de la Belgique (d’après Dubois et al., 2014a).
Légende A: Large weathered zone situated at the top of the limestone. As the alterite has undergone compaction the overburden has been drawn down into the weathered corridor; B: Weathered corridor still containing its residual alterite; C: Ghost-endokarst completely included in the rock.A : Grande zone altérée située au sommet du calcaire. Au fur et à mesure que l'altérite a subi un compactage, les formations de couverture ont été entraînées dans le couloir altéré; B : Couloir altéré contenant encore son altérite résiduelle ; C : Pseudoendokarst complètement inclus dans la roche.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 604k
Titre Fig. 4 - Thin-sections of the Carboniferous encrinites limestone from Soignies analysed under cathodoluminescence microscopy.Fig. 4 - Lames minces du calcaire carbonifère à encrinite de Soignies analysées en microscopie à cathodoluminescence.
Légende A: Fresh rock mainly composed by micro-crystalline calcite, carbonated fossils and dolomite. No porosity is visible on the thin section; B: completely weathered rock made of fragments of fossils, amorphous black minerals and voids. The calcareous matrix has been dissolved leading to the creation of porosity. Exogenous minerals have sweep in the alterite. From Dubois et al., 2014a.A : Roche fraîche composée principalement de calcite microcristalline, de fossiles carbonatés et de dolomie. Aucune porosité n'est visible sur la lame mince ; B : roche complètement altérée constituée de fragments de fossiles, de minéraux noirs amorphes et de vides. La matrice calcaire s'est dissoute entraînant la création de porosité. Les minéraux exogènes ont balayé l'altérite. D’après Dubois et al., 2014a.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 500k
Titre Tab. 1 - Presentation and description of the cave patterns (Palmer, 1991).Tab. 1 - Présentation et description des réseaux de grottes (Palmer, 1991).
Légende A: Single gallery; B: Branchwork; C: Network; D: Anastomotic; E: Spongework; F: Ramiform.A : Galerie unique ; B : Ramifié ; C : Réseau ; D : En anastomose ; E : En éponge ; F : Ramiforme.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 280k
Titre Fig. 5 - Common cave patterns (modified from Palmer, 1991).Fig. 5 - Modèles de grottes communs (modifié à partir de Palmer, 1991).
Légende The sketches can illustrate both plan and cross-section views. A: Single gallery: Vilaine Source Cave, Namur; B: Branchwork: Rouffignac Cave, Dordogne, France (from Martel in Gèze, 1965); C: Network: Breathing Cave, Virginia, USA (from Deike, 1960); D: Anastomotic: Hölloch Cave, Schwyz, Switzerland (from Bögli, 1970); E: Ramiform and Spongework: Carlsbad Cavern, New Mexico, USA (Bretz, 1949).Les croquis peuvent illustrer des vues en plan et en coupe. A : Galerie unique : Grotte de la Source Vilaine, Namur ; B : Réseau en arborescence : Grotte de Rouffignac, Dordogne, France (de Martel dans Gèze, 1965) ; C : Réseau : Breathing Cave, Virginie, USA (d'après Deike, 1960) ; D : Anastomosé : Grotte de Hölloch, Schwyz, Suisse (d'après Bögli, 1970) ; E : Ramiforme et en épong : Carlsbad Cavern, Nouveau-Mexique, États-Unis (Bretz, 1949).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-6.png
Fichier image/png, 312k
Titre Fig. 6 - Common sections of horizontal features.Fig. 6 - Sections courantes de formes horizontales.
Légende A: Kavuaya Cave, Bas-Congo, RDC (Quinif, 1985); B: Chalet Cave, Aywaille, Belgium; C, E: Luweng Banteng, Gunung Sewu, Java (Quinif, 1984); D: Damous Fedjoudj, Algeria (Quinif, 1977); G, H, I: Fréyr Cave, Dinant, Belgium (Quinif, 1982); J: Lorette Cave, Rochefort, Belgium (Vandycke and Quinif, 2001).A : Grotte de Kavuaya, Bas-Congo, RDC (Quinif, 1985) ; B : Grotte du Chalet, Aywaille, Belgique ; C, E : Luweng Banteng, Gunung Sewu, Java (Quinif, 1984) ; D : Damous Fedjoudj, Algérie (Quinif, 1977) ; G, H, I : Grotte de Fréyr, Dinant, Belgique (Quinif, 1982) ; J : Grotte de Lorette, Rochefort, Belgique (Vandycke et Quinif, 2001).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-7.png
Fichier image/png, 177k
Titre Fig. 7 - Some types of horizontal features.Fig. 7 - Types de formes horizontales.
Légende A: Cave of “Les Echelles” (Massif de la Chartreuse, Rhône-Alpes, France); B: Cave of “Père Noël” (Massif de Han-sur-Lesse); C: Cave of Han-sur-Lesse; D: Cave of Trabuc, Gard, France.A : Grotte des « Echelles » (Massif de la Chartreuse, Rhône-Alpes, France) ; B : Grotte du « Père Noël » (Massif de Han-sur-Lesse) ; C : Grotte de Han-sur-Lesse ; D : Grotte de Trabuc, Gard, France.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-8.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 424k
Titre Fig. 8 - Examples of vertical features.Fig. 8 - Exemples de formes verticales.
Légende A: Avens in Sidi Rgheiss Mountain, Algeria (Quinif, 1975); B: Aven of the “Bloc coïncé” in Rawil Mountain, Bern, Switzerland (Topography by Quinif and Maboge); C: Part of the cave Trou des Nûtons, Namur, Belgium (Quinif, 1978); D: Aven Armand, Languedoc-Roussillon, France (Martel, 1894).A : Avens dans la montagne du Sidi Rgheiss, Algérie (Quinif, 1975) ; B : Aven du « Bloc coïncé », Rawil, Berne, Suisse (Topographie de Quinif et Maboge) ; C : Partie de la grotte du Trou des Nûtons, Namur, Belgique (Quinif, 1978) ; D : Aven Armand, Languedoc-Roussillon, France (Martel, 1894).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-9.png
Fichier image/png, 432k
Titre Fig. 9 - Examples of vertical feature.Fig. 9 - Exemples de formes verticales.
Légende A: “Trou Bernard”, Namur, Belgium. This pit is a step-in a down going gallery; B: Aven in the high Alps, Switzerland; C: Aven in Debagh Mountain (Algeria).A : « Trou Bernard », Namur, Belgique. Ce puits est une galerie descendante en marches d’escalier; B : Aven dans les hautes Alpes, Suisse; C : Aven au Djebel Debagh (Algérie).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-10.png
Fichier image/png, 1,0M
Titre Fig. 10 - “Dôme” Room, cave of Han-sur-Lesse, Rochefort, Belgium (Quinif and Bastin, 1984).Fig. 10 - Salle « Dôme », grotte de Han-sur-Lesse, Rochefort, Belgique (Quinif et Bastin, 1984).
Légende G.N. Geographic North. M.N. Magnetic North. S. Sumps.G.N. Nord géographique. M.N. Nord magnétique. S. Puisards.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-11.png
Fichier image/png, 226k
Titre Fig. 11 - Solutional sculpturing.Fig. 11 - Microformes de dissolution.
Légende A: Ceiling pocket - Cave of “Père Euchère”, Vaucluse, France; B: Differential dissolution features - Père Noël Cave, Han-sur-Lesse, Namur, Belgium; C: Anastomosis – “Vilaine Source” Cave, Namur, Belgium; D: Pendants – “Père Noël” Cave, Han-sur-Lesse, Namur, Belgium; E: Overdeepening and potholes - The “Barrique” Hole, Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France; F: Scallops, “Nou Maulin” Cave, Namur, Belgium.A : Coupole - Grotte du « Père Euchère », Vaucluse, France ; B : Microformes de dissolution différentielle - Grotte du Père Noël, Han-sur-Lesse, Namur, Belgique ; C : Anastomoses – Grotte « Vilaine Source », Namur, Belgique ; D : Pendants de voûte – Grotte du « Père Noël », Han-sur-Lesse, Namur, Belgique ; E : Surcreusement et marmite - Le trou de la « Barrique », Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France ; F : Coups de gouge, Grotte du « Nou Maulin », Namur, Belgique.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-12.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 1,1M
Titre Tab. 2 - Description and commonly accepted origins of microforms.Tab. 2 - Description et origines communément acceptées des microformes.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-13.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 552k
Titre Fig. 12 - Fracture Network in Clypot Quarry, Soignies, Hainaut (Belgium).Fig. 12 - Réseau de fractures dans la carrière de Clypot, Soignies, Hainaut (Belgique).
Légende A: Photo of the South wall of the quarry. It shows the density of large corridors in Thiarmont Formation and narrower features but as dense in Soignies Formation; B: Map of the karst features (Quinif and Quinif, 2002). 1: Corridors. 2: Ghostrocks recognized in section. 3: Features attributed to caves. 4: Caves resulting from the removing of alterite and replacement by river. 5: Lapiaz. 6: Blocks.A : Photo du mur sud de la carrière. Il montre la densité de grands corridors dans la Formation de Thiarmont et des formes plus étroites mais aussi denses dans la Formation de Soignies ; B : Carte des formes karstiques (Quinif et Quinif, 2002). 1 : Couloirs. 2 : fantômes de roche reconnus en coupe. 3 : Formes attribuées aux grottes. 4 : Grottes résultant de l'enlèvement de l'altérite et remplacement par l’action d’une rivière. 5 : Lapiaz. 6 : Blocs.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-14.png
Fichier image/png, 2,0M
Titre Fig. 13 - Crinoidal limestone of Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium. Fig. 13 - Calcaire crinoïdique de Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique.
Légende The limestone is visible in Clypot Quarry, Soignies. It is a compact and non-porous limestone. The ghostrock features are located around the opened joints (A); B: The microscopic analyses of the fresh rock (PPL) show lots of fossils highly cemented by calcitic matrix; C: The microscopic analyses of the weathered rock (PPL) reveal voids (brown spots) between the fossils. The matrix has been dissolved.Le calcaire est visible dans la carrière du Clypot, à Soignies. C'est un calcaire compact et non poreux. Les éléments de fantôme de roche sont situés autour des joints ouverts (A) ; B : Les analyses microscopiques de la roche fraîche (PPL) montrent de nombreux fossiles fortement cimentés par la matrice calcitique ; C : Les analyses microscopiques de la roche altérée (PPL) révèlent des vides (taches brunes) entre les fossiles. La matrice a été dissoute.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-15.png
Fichier image/png, 855k
Titre Fig. 14 - Bioclastic limestone of Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France (Dubois et al., 2011).Fig. 14 - Calcaire bioclastique de Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France (Dubois et al., 2011).
Légende A: The limestone is visible in Piquepoche Quarry, Frontenac. The darker area is the ghostrock features that have developed from an initial vertical fracture and then through a horizontal porous stratum; B: Rock sample of this limestone. Its texture shows fossils cemented to each other by calcite and a macroscopic porosity; C: The microscopic analyses of the fresh rock (XPL) expose the fossils, a calcitic matrix and some voids (black area); D: The microscopic analyses of the weathered rock (XPL) reveal big holes between the elements of the rock and the matrix; the fossils are riddled by holes.A : Le calcaire est visible dans la carrière Piquepoche, Frontenac. La zone la plus sombre correspond aux éléments de fantôme de roche qui se sont développés à partir d'une fracture verticale initiale, puis à travers une strate poreuse horizontale ; B : Échantillon de ce calcaire. Sa texture montre des fossiles cimentés les uns aux autres par la calcite et une porosité macroscopique ; C : Les analyses microscopiques de la roche fraîche (XPL) mettent à nu les fossiles, une matrice calcitique et quelques vides (zone noire) ; D : Les analyses microscopiques de la roche altérée (XPL) révèlent de gros trous entre les éléments de la roche et la matrice ; les fossiles sont criblés de trous.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-16.png
Fichier image/png, 1,3M
Titre Fig. 15 - A ghostrock feature shaped as a keyhole at Gauthier-Wincqz Quarry in Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium.Fig. 15 - Un fantôme de roche en forme de trou de serrure à la carrière Gauthier-Wincqz à Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique.
Légende A: Photo from Quinif et al. (1993); B: Sketch of the feature. 1. Fresh unweathered limestone; 2. Stratified silt deposits; 3. Thin fluvial deposit with highly weathered quartz pebbles; 4. Residual alterite resulting from ghostrock karstification.A : Photo issue de Quinif et al. (1993) ; B : Croquis de la forme. 1. Calcaire frais non altéré ; 2. Dépôts de limon stratifiés ; 3. Mince dépôt fluviatile à galets de quartz fortement altérés; 4. Altérite résiduelle résultant de la karstification de type fantôme de roche.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-17.png
Fichier image/png, 1,7M
Titre Fig. 16 - Examples of labyrinthine cave networks in which the residual alterite has been observed (Dubois et al., 2014a).Fig. 16 - Exemples de réseaux de grottes labyrinthiques dans lesquels l'altérite résiduelle a été observée (Dubois et al., 2014a).
Légende A: Trabuc Cave in Languedoc (France) is located at the contact between the Hettangian dolostone and Sinemurian limestone. This network comprises 10 km of galleries with difference in level of 200 m (Bruxelles, 1998); B: Fayt Cave in Ardennes (Belgium) is located in Devonian limestone. This network comprises 2 km of galleries with difference in level of 50 m; C: Felix-Mazauric network of Bramabiau Cave in Languedoc, France, is located in the Grands Causses. This network comprises 11 km of galleries with difference in level of 100 m (Bruxelles and Bruxelles, 2002).A : La grotte de Trabuc en Languedoc (France) est située au contact de la dolomie hettangienne et du calcaire sinémurien. Ce réseau comprend 10 km de galeries avec un dénivelé de 200 m (Bruxelles, 1998) ; B : La grotte du Fayt en Ardenne (Belgique) est située dans le calcaire dévonien. Ce réseau comprend 2 km de galeries avec un dénivelé de 50 m ; C : Le réseau Félix-Mazauric de la Grotte de Bramabiau en Languedoc, France, est situé dans les Grands Causses. Ce réseau comprend 11 km de galeries avec un dénivelé de 100 m (Bruxelles et Bruxelles, 2002).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-18.png
Fichier image/png, 385k
Titre Fig. 17 - Quentin Cave in Nocarcentre Quarry, Soignies, Hainaut, Belgium (from Quinif and Maire, 2010).Fig. 17 - Grotte Quentin dans la carrière de Nocarcentre, Soignies, Hainaut, Belgique (d'après Quinif et Maire, 2010).
Légende A-B: Galleries of the cave; C: End of the gallery, the water spring out of the alterite; D: Map of the cave. 1. Rock slide. 2. River. 3. Fine sediments (reworked alterite). 4. Vault cupola. 5a. escarpment. 5b. Quarry wall.A-B : Galeries de la grotte ; C : Au bout de la galerie, l'eau jaillit de l'altérite ; D : Plan de la grotte. 1. Pente. 2. Rivière. 3. Sédiments fins (altérite remaniée). 4. Coupole de voûte. 5a. Escarpement. 5b. Paroi de la carrière.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-19.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 832k
Titre Fig. 18 - La Fuie Cave in Chasseneuil, Charente, France.Fig. 18 - Grotte de la Fuie à Chasseneuil, Charente, France.
Légende A-B: Galleries of the cave. Beds of weathered cherts are left in positive relief by the erosion of the alterite; C: Map of the cave (Dandurand, 2011; Dandurand and Maire, 2011). 1. Sinkhole; 2. Hopper – Fontis; 3. Channel; 4. Flow direction; 5. Collapse blocks; D: Slice in a weathered chert; a-slightly weathered zone; b-moderately weathered zone; c-highly weathered zone; E: Microscopic study of the weathered chert. On the perimeter there is a border of iron oxides.A-B : Galeries de la grotte. Des lits de cherts altérés sont laissés en relief par l'érosion de l'altérite ; C : Plan de la grotte (Dandurand, 2011 ; Dandurand et Maire, 2011) ; 1. Doline ; 2. Trémie – Fontis ; 3. Chenal ; 4. Sens de l'écoulement ; 5. Blocs éboulés ; D : Lame dans un chert altéré ; une zone légèrement altérée ; b- Zone modérément altérée ; c- Zone fortement altérée ; E : Étude microscopique du chert altéré. Sur le périmètre, il y a une bordure d'oxydes de fer.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-20.png
Fichier image/png, 640k
Titre Fig. 19 - La Barrique Hole in Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France (Lans et al., 2006).Fig. 19 - Trou de la Barrique à Saint Martin du Puy, Aquitaine, France (Lans et al., 2006).
Légende A: Gallery in the cave; B: Map of the cave; 1. Major faults. 2. Areas with lot of speleothems.A : Galerie dans la grotte. B : Plan de la grotte. 1. Failles majeures. 2. Zones avec beaucoup de spéléothèmes.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-21.png
Fichier image/png, 1,8M
Titre Fig. 20 - A cross-section through Monte Bisbino, Lombardy (Italy) showing the three main cave systems resulting from ghostrock karstification (Dubois et al., 2014a).Fig. 20 - Coupe transversale du Monte Bisbino, Lombardie (Italie) montrant les trois principaux systèmes de grottes résultant de la karstification par fantômisation (Dubois et al., 2014a).
Légende A: Bucco della Volpe; B: Grotta dell “Alpe Madrona”; C: Zocca d'Ass. The karst systems have developed above the limit of ghostrock weathering as depicted by the dotted line.A : Bucco della Volpe ; B : Grotta dell « Alpe Madrona » ; C : Zocca d'Ass. Les systèmes karstiques se sont développés au-dessus de la limite d'altération de la fantômisation, comme illustré par la ligne pointillée.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-22.png
Fichier image/png, 138k
Titre Fig. 21 - Collapse sinkholes, Gaurain-Ramecroix near Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium).Fig. 21 - Gouffres d'effondrement, Gaurain-Ramecroix près de Tournai (Hainaut, Belgique).
Légende Sinkhole opened by the lowering of the water table due to the mining of quarries and water exploitation (A and B). The limestone lies under a thick overburden.Gouffre ouvert par l'abaissement de la surface piézométrique dû au creusement des carrières et à l'exploitation de l'eau (A et B). Le calcaire repose sous des formations de couverture.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-23.png
Fichier image/png, 724k
Titre Fig. 22 - Gi Hole in Gaurain-Ramecroix near Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium).Fig. 22 - Trou Gi à Gaurain-Ramecroix près de Tournai (Hainaut, Belgique).
Légende The cavity is part of an emptied ghost corridor. The void has been created by compaction of the alterite due to the lowering of the water table. A-B: Sinkhole in a field; C: The walls of the cave show lateral benches; D: Cross section of the pit. From the bottom to the top of the section, we have Carboniferous limestones, Cretaceous marls, Thanetian sands and soil.La cavité fait partie d'un couloir fantôme vidé. Le vide a été créé par compactage de l'altérite dû à l'abaissement de la surface piézométrique. A-B : Gouffre dans un champ ; C : Les parois de la grotte présentent des banquettes latérales ; D : Coupe transversale du puits. Du bas vers le haut de la coupe, nous avons des calcaires carbonifères, des marnes crétacées, des sables thanétien et le sol.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-24.png
Fichier image/png, 1,2M
Titre Fig. 23 - Val Imagna, Alps, Italy.Fig. 23 - Val Imagna, Alpes, Italie.
Légende A: Cross-section of the Bus de la Siberia Cave. This cavity results from the emptying of a ghostrock network. It presents numerous blind pits; B: Outcrops of ghostrocks corridors; C: Side wall of a vertical ghost-corridor.A : Coupe transversale de la grotte du Bus de la Siberia. Cette cavité résulte de la vidange d'un réseau de fantômes de roche. Il présente de nombreuses puits aveugles ; B : Affleurements de couloirs fantômes ; C : Paroi latérale d'un couloir fantôme vertical.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-25.png
Fichier image/png, 750k
Titre Fig. 24 - Trabuc Cave, Gard, France.Fig. 24 - Grotte de Trabuc, Gard, France.
Légende A: Map of the cave organized on 2 fracture sets; B: Great gallery on an initial ghostrock corridor; C: Junction between two great galleries; D: Cupolas resulting from the ghostrock process.A : Plan de la grotte organisé sur 2 jeux de fractures ; B : Grande galerie sur un premier couloir fantôme ; C : Jonction entre deux grandes galeries ; D : Coupoles résultant de la fantômisation.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-26.png
Fichier image/png, 3,0M
Titre Fig. 25 - Weathered stratum at the top of the Antiparos Room, Han-sur-Lesse Cave, Namur (Belgium).Fig. 25 - Strate altérée au sommet de la salle d’Antiparos, Grotte de Han-sur-Lesse, Namur (Belgique).
Légende The alterite appears darker behind the hammer. The micritic cement of the fossils is dissolved highlighting the sparitic parts.L'altérite apparaît plus foncée derrière le marteau. Le ciment micritique des fossiles est dissous mettant en évidence les parties sparitiques.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-27.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 464k
Titre Fig. 26 - Parietal microforms in Piquepoche Quarry, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).Fig. 26 - Microformes pariétales de la carrière Piquepoche, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).
Légende A: Ghostrock feature partially emptied of its alterite due to the quarrying, anastomosis and pendants are visible; B: Limestone block that previously was a wall of a ghostrock with anastomosis and pendants. Without the presence of alterite, it is not possible to determine the karst process that led to the creation these forms.A : Forme issue de fantôme de roche partiellement vidée de son altérite en raison de l'extraction, des anastomoses et des pendentifs sont visibles ; B : Bloc de calcaire qui était auparavant un mur de fantôme de roche avec anastomoses et pendants. Sans la présence d'altérite, il n'est pas possible de déterminer le processus karstique qui a conduit à la création de ces formes.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-28.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 484k
Titre Fig. 27 - Parietal microforms observed in ghostrock features.Fig. 27 - Microformes pariétales observées dans les fantômes de roche.
Légende A: Ceiling pocket, Clypot Quarry, Soignies (Hainaut, Belgium); B: Notches and projections, Hainaut Quarry, Soignies (Hainaut, Belgium); C: Calcite vein highlighted by the differential dissolution, Milieu Quarry, Tournai (Hainaut, Belgium); D: Anastomosis and pendants, Piquepoche Quarry, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).A : Coupoles, Carrière du Clypot, Soignies (Hainaut, Belgique) ; B : Banquettes latérales, Carrière du Hainaut, Soignies (Hainaut, Belgique) ; C : Veine de calcite mise en évidence par la dissolution différentielle, Carrière du Milieu, Tournai (Hainaut, Belgique) ; D : Anastomose et pendants, Carrière Piquepoche, Frontenac (Aquitaine, France).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-29.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 836k
Titre Fig. 28 - The Barrique Hole, Saint Martin du Puy (Aquitaine, France).Fig. 28 - Trou de la barrique, Saint Martin du Puy (Aquitaine, France).
Légende A: Ghost-rock gallery emptied of its alterite with a subsequent hydrological development of the cavity (Dubois et al., 2011). Overdeepenings and potholes are visible on the walls and on the ground of the cavity. 1. Fresh rock; 2. Alterite; 3. Void. Two hypotheses of evolution: the void at the top of the section developed along a weathered stratum and a subsequent fluvial evolution shaped the overdeepening and benches (B); The whole cavity was entirely shaped by ghost-rock karstification and the free flow in open cavity resulted in the removal of the alterite (C).A : Galerie issue de fantôme de roche, vidée de son altérite avec un surcreusement fluviatile ultérieur (Dubois et al., 2011). Un surcreusement et des marmites de géant sont visibles sur les parois et sur le sol de la cavité. 1. Roche fraîche ; 2. Altérite ; 3. Vide. Deux hypothèses d'évolution : le vide au sommet de la coupe s'est développé le long d'une strate altérée et une évolution fluviale postérieure a façonné le surcreusement et les banquettes (B) ; L'ensemble de la cavité a été entièrement façonné par la karstification de type fantôme et l'écoulement libre dans le fantôme de roche a entraîné l'élimination de l'altérite (C).
URL http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/docannexe/image/16327/img-30.png
Fichier image/png, 871k
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Caroline Dubois, Alfredo Bini et Yves Quinif, « Karst morphologies and ghostrock karstification », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement,  | 2022, 13-31.

Référence électronique

Caroline Dubois, Alfredo Bini et Yves Quinif, « Karst morphologies and ghostrock karstification », Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement [En ligne],  | 2022, mis en ligne le 03 février 2022, consulté le 21 mai 2022. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/geomorphologie/16327 ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/geomorphologie.16327

Haut de page

Auteurs

Caroline Dubois

Department of Geology and Applied Geology, Faculty of Engineering, University of Mons, Rue de Houdain, 9, B-7000 Mons, Belgique. Fond National de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS), Rue d'Egmont 5, B-1000 Bruxelles, Belgique.

Alfredo Bini

Department of Earth Science, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Festa del Perdono 7 - I-20122 Milano, Italy.

Yves Quinif

Department of Geology and Applied Geology, Faculty of Engineering, University of Mons, Rue de Houdain, 9, B-7000 Mons, Belgique.

Articles du même auteur

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

© Groupe français de géomorphologie

Haut de page
  • Logo CNRS - Institut des sciences humaines et sociales
  • Logo Groupe français de géomorphologie
  • OpenEdition Journals
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search