Navigation – Plan du site
Article
Bibliography

D.H. Lawrence: A Bibliography

Shirley Bricout
p. 161-211

Entrées d’index

Studied authors :

David Herbert Lawrence

Texte intégral

I. Short stories and novellas by D. H. Lawrence

a- 1910-1929

1Title. First edition. Standard scholarly edition(s).

2The Prussian Officer and Other Stories. London: Duckworth, 1914. Ed. John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1983. Ed. Antony Atkins. Oxford UP, 1995. Print.
Contains “The Prussian Officer” (first appeared in the
English Review and in Metropolitan in 1914 as “Honour and Arms”), “The Thorn in the Flesh” (first published in the English Review as “Vin Ordinaire” in 1914), “Daughters of the Vicar” (a version appeared in Time and Tide in 1934 as “Two Marriages”), “A Fragment of Stained Glass” (English Review 1911), “The Shades of Spring” (first appeared in the Forum in 1913 as “The Soiled Rose”), “Second Best” (English Review 1912), “The Shadow in the Rose Garden” (Smart Set 1914), “Goose Fair” (English Review 1910), “The White Stocking” (Smart Set 1914), “A Sick Collier” (New Statesman 1913), “The Christening” (Smart Set 1914), “Odour of Chrysanthemums” (English Review 1911; later adapted into a play The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd).
The Cambridge edition also includes Appendix I “Odour of Chrysanthemums Fragment” and Appendix II “Two Marriages.”

3England, My England and Other Stories. New York: Seltzer, 1922. Ed. Bruce Steele. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1990. Ed. Bruce Steele. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1995. Print.
Contains “England, My England” (
English Review 1915), “Tickets, please” (Strand 1919), “The Blind Man” (English Review 1920), “Monkey Nuts” (Sovereign 1922), “Wintry Peacock” (Metropolitan 1921), “Hadrian” (appeared as “You Touched Me” in Land and Water in 1920), “Samson and Delilah” (English Review 1917), “The Primrose Path,” “The Horse Dealer’s Daughter” ( English Review 1922; in its draft stage was known as “The Miracle”), “The Last Straw” (Hutchinson’s Story Magazine 1921 entitled “Fanny and Annie”).
The Cambridge and Penguin editions provide a selection of Uncollected Stories 1913-22: “The Mortal Coil” (
Seven Arts, 1917) “The Thimble” (Seven Arts 1917), “Adolf” (Dial, 1920), “Rex” (Dial 1921) and an appendix “England, My England,” 1915 version.

4The Ladybird, The Fox, The Captain’s Doll. London: Secker, 1923. Print.
The Captain’s Doll: Three Novelettes. New York: Seltzer, 1923. Print.
The Fox, The Captain’s Doll, The Ladybird. Ed. Dieter Mehl. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1992. Print.
These editions contain three novellas:
The Fox (periodical publication in an earlier version in Hutchinson’s Story Magazine in 1920, revised and published in installments in the Dial in 1922), The Captain’s Doll (loosely based on “The Mortal Coil”), The Ladybird (a later version of “The Thimble”).
The Cambridge edition also provides Appendix I “Ending of the First Version of
The Fox” and Appendix II “The Fox: Hermitage and Those Farm Girls.”

5St. Mawr. New York: Knopf, 1925. Print.
St. Mawr Together with The Princess. London: Secker 1925. Print.
St. Mawr and Other Stories. Ed. Brian Finney. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1983. Ed. Brian Finney. London: Penguin 1997. Print.
These editions contain
St. Mawr, and “The Princess” (first published in installments in the March, April and May 1925 issues of the Calendar of Modern Letters).
The Cambridge and Penguin editions also add “The Overtone,” Appendix I “The Wilful Woman” and Appendix II “The Flying Fish.”

6Glad Ghosts. London: Ernest Benn, 1926. Print.

7The Woman Who Rode Away and Other Stories. London: Secker 1928. London: Penguin, 1970. Eds. Dieter Mehl and Christa Jansohn. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1995. Print.
Contains “Two Blue Birds” (
Dial 1927), Sun (New Coterie 1926), “The Woman Who Rode Away” (first published in the Dial in two installments in 1925), “Smile” (Nation & Anthenaeum 1926), “The Border-Line” (Hutchinson’s Magazine and Smart Set 1924), “Jimmy and the Desperate Woman” (Criterion 1924), “The Last Laugh” (The New Decameron IV 1925), “In Love” (Dial 1927), “The Man Who Loved Islands” (first published in the Dial in two installments in 1927, and collected only in the American edition of The Woman Who Rode Away and Other Stories, Knopf 1928, and not in the Penguin 1970 edition), Glad Ghosts (first published in installments in the Dial 1926), “None of That.”
The Penguin edition also contains “A Modern Lover” and “Strike-Pay.”
The Penguin and Cambridge editions also include “The Rocking Horse Winner” (
Harper’s Bazaar 1926, also compiled in The Ghost Book: 16 New Stories of the Uncanny, edited by Lady Cynthia Asquith, Hutchinson, 1926), “The Lovely Lady” (first collected in Cynthia Asquith’s The Back Cap: New Stories of Murder, Hutchinson, 1927).
The Cambridge edition provides additional material with Appendix I “
Sun: Variants,” Appendix II “‘The Border-Line’: Early Manuscript Version,” Appendix III “‘The Last Laugh’: Lawrence’s revisions in MS,” Appendix IV “‘More Modern Love’: Manuscript Version of ‘In Love,’” Appendix V “‘The Man Who Love Islands’: First Manuscript Version,” Appendix VI “‘Glad Ghosts’ Lawrence’s Manuscript Revisions,” Appendix VII “‘The Lovely Lady’: The Black Cap Version” and Appendix VIII “A Pure Witch.”

8The Escaped Cock. Paris: Black Sun Press, 1929. Print.

b- Posthumous collections

9The Virgin and the Gipsy. Florence: Orioli, 1930. Print.

10Love Among the Haystacks and Other Pieces. London: Nonesuch, 1930. New York: Viking, 1933. Print.
Contains “A Reminiscence by David Garnett,” “Love Among the Haystacks,” “A Chapel Among the Mountains,” “A Hay Hut Among the Mountains” (the latter two being travel pieces), “Once.”

11“Adolf” and “The Fly in the Ointment.” Young Lorenzo: Early Life of D. H. Lawrence. Eds. Ada Lawrence and G. Stuart Gelder. Florence: Orioli, 1932. Print.

12The Lovely Lady and Other Stories. London: Secker, 1933. Print.
Contains “The Blue Moccasins” (Eve: The Lady’s Pictorial 1928) “The Lovely Lady,” “The Man Who Loved Islands,” “Mother and Daughter” (New Criterion 1929), “The Overtone,” “Rawdon’s Roof,” “Things” (Bookman 1928), “The Rocking-Horse Winner.”

13A Modern Lover. London: Secker, 1934. Print.
Contains “Her Turn,” “A Modern Lover,” “New Eve and Old Adam,” “The Old Adam,” “Strike Pay” (
Saturday Westminster Gazette 1913), “Witch à la Mode” (Lovat Dickson’s Magazine 1934), and also Mr. Noon.

14The Tales of D. H. Lawrence. London: Secker, 1934. Reprinted in 2 volumes, St Clair Shores: Scholarly Press, 1972. Print.
Contains all the short stories published between 1914 and 1931.

15Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence. Ed. Edward D. McDonald. London: Heinemann, 1936, 1961. London: Penguin, 1978. Print.
Contains “Adolf,” “A Dream of Life” (published as “Autobiographical Fragment”), “The Flying Fish,” “Miner at Home” (
Nation 1912), “Mercury,” (Atlantic Monthly 1927), “Rex” (Dial 1921), and “The Undying Man.”

16Stories, Essays and Poems. Ed. Desmond Hawkins. London: Dent, 1939. Reprinted as D. H. Lawrence’s Stories, Essays and Poems. London: Dent, 1967. Print.

17A Prelude, Thames Ditton: Merle Press, 1949. Print.

18The Portable D. H. Lawrence. Ed. Diana Trilling. New York: Viking, 1947. New York: Penguin, 1977. Print.
Contains “The Blind Man,”
The Fox, “The Lovely Lady,” “The Princess,” “The Prussian Officer,” “The Rocking-Horse Winner” and “Tickets, Please.”

19The Complete Short Stories of D. H. Lawrence. London: Heinemann, 1955. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1976. 3 vols. Print.

20The Short Novels. London: Heinemann, 1956. 2 vols. Print.
Contains
The Captain’s Doll, The Fox, The Ladybird, “Love Among the Haystacks,” “The Man Who Died,” St. Mawr, The Virgin and the Gipsy.

21St. Mawr and the Man Who Died, New York: Random House, 1959. Print.

22Four Short Novels. New York: Viking 1965. New York: Penguin 1976. Print.
Contains
The Captain’s Doll, The Fox, The Ladybird, “Love Among the Haystacks.”

23Phoenix II: Uncollected, Unpublished, and Other Prose Works by D. H. Lawrence. Eds. Warren Roberts and Harry T. Moore. London: Heinemann, 1968. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1978. Print.
Contains “Delilah and Mr. Bircumshaw,” “Fly in the Ointment,” “Lessford’s Rabbits,” “A Lesson on a Tortoise,” “The Mortal Coil,” “Once–!” “A Prelude,” and “The Thimble.”

24Three Novellas: The Fox, The Ladybird, The Captain’s Doll. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1970. Print.

25Love Among the Haystacks and Other Stories. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1970. Print.
Contains: “Love Among the Haystacks,” “The Lovely Lady,” “Rawdon’s Roof,” “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” “The Man Who Loved Islands” and “The Man Who Died.”

26The Mortal Coil and Other Stories. Ed. Keith Sagar. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1971. Print.
Contains “The Mortal Coil,” “A Chapel and a Hay Hut among the Mountains,” “Adolf,” “Delilah and Mr. Bircumshaw,” “A Fly in the Ointment,” “Her Turn,” “Lessford’s Rabbits,” “A Lesson on a Tortoise,” “The Miner at Home,” “New Eve and Old Adam,” “The Old Adam,”
“Once –!” “A Prelude,” “Rex,” ‘The Thimble” and “Witch à la Mode.”

27The Princess and Other Stories. Ed. Keith Sagar. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1971. Print.
Contains “The Princess,” “The Blue Moccasins,” “A Dream of Life” (“Autobiographical Fragment”), “The Flying Fish,” “The Man Who Was Through with the World,” “Mother and Daughter,” “Mercury,” “The Overtone,” Sun, “Things,” “The Undying Man,” “The Wilful Woman.”

28St. Mawr and The Virgin and the Gipsy. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1971. Print.

29The Collected Short Stories of D. H. Lawrence. London: Heinemann, 1974. 3 vols. Print.

30The Escaped Cock. Ed. Gerald Lacy. Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, 1976. Print.

31Love Among the Haystacks and Other Stories. Ed. John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1987. London: Penguin 1996. Print.
Contains “A Prelude” (
Nottinghamshire Guardian, 1907), “A Lesson on a Tortoise,” “Lessford’s Rabbits,” “A Modern Lover,” “The Fly in the Ointment,” “The Witch à la Mode,” “The Old Adam,” “The Miner at Home,” “Her Turn” (Saturday Westminster Gazette, 1913), “Strike-Pay,” “Delilah and Mr. Bircumshaw” (Virginia Quarterly Review, 1940), “Love Among the Haystacks,” “Once –!” “New Eve and Old Adam.”
The Cambridge edition also provides Appendix I “‘Two Schools’ Fragment,” Appendix II “‘Delilah and Mr. Bircumshaw’ Fragment,” Appendix III “‘Burns Novel’ Fragments.”

32The Virgin and the Gipsy and Other Stories. Eds. Michael Herbert, Bethan Jones, and Lindeth Vasey. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2006. Print.
Contains “The Virgin and the Gipsy,” “Things,” “Rawdon’s Roof,” “Mother and Daughter,” “The Escaped Cock,” “The Blue Moccasins,” Appendix I “‘The Escaped Cock’: Early Versions, Appendix II “‘The Man Who Was Through with the World,” Appendix III “The Undying Man,” Appendix IV “The Blue Moccasins: Early Versions,” Appendix V “The Woman Who Wanted to Disappear.”

33Selected Stories. Ed. Sue Wilson. London: Penguin, 2007. Print.
Contains “Love Among the Haystacks,” “The Miner at Home,” “The White Stocking,” “Odour of Chrysanthemums,” “New Eve and Old Adam,” “Vin Ordinaire,” “The Prussian Officer,” “England, My England,” “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter,” The Blind Man,” “Adolf,” “The Last Straw,” “Sun,” “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” The Man Who Loved Islands” and “Things.”

34Vicar’s Garden and Other Stories. Ed. N. H. Reeve. Cambridge: Cambridge, UP, 2009. Print.
A collection of manuscripts and other early versions of some of D. H. Lawrence’s short stories, as well as stories which have never been published before. Contains “The Vicar’s Garden” (written 1907), “The Shadow in the Rose Garden,” “A Page from the Annals of Gresleia” (1907), “Ruby-Glass” (1907), “The White Stocking,” “‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’ Version 2” (1910), “‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’ Version 3” (1911), “Intimacy” (1911), “The Harassed Angel” (1911), “Vin Ordinaire” (1913), “‘The Blind Man’ Version 1” (1918), “‘Wintry Peacock’ Version 1” (1919), Appendix “The July 1914 ending of ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums.’”

35The Collected Supernatural and Weird Fiction of D. H. Lawrence: Three Novelettes – “Glad Ghosts,” “The Man Who Died,” and “The Border-Line” – and Five Short Stories of the Macabre and Unusual. Milton Keynes: Leonaur, 2009. Print.
One of a series of collected “supernatural and weird fiction” of writers in English. The “Five Short Stories of the Macabre and Unusual” are “Smile,” The Last Laugh,”
Sun, “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”

II. Other works in chronological order

36Title. First edition. Standard scholarly edition.

37The White Peacock. London: Heinemann, 1911. Ed. Andrew Robertson. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1983. Print.

38The Trespasser. London: Duckworth, 1912. Ed. Elizabeth Mansfield. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1981. Print.

39Love Poems and Others. London: Duckworth, 1913. D. H. Lawrence: The Poems. Ed. Christopher Pollnitz. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1992. 2 vols. Print.

40Sons and Lovers. London: Duckworth, 1913. Eds. Helen Baron and Carl Baron. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1992. Print.

41The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd. Written 1914. First performed 1916. The Plays. Eds. Hans-Wilhelm Schwarze and John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1999. 2 vols. Print.

42The Rainbow. London: Methuen, 1915. Ed. Mark Kinkead-Weekes. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1989. Print.

43Twilight in Italy. London: Duckworth, 1916. Twilight in Italy and Other Essays. Ed. Paul Eggert. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994. Print.

44Amores. London: Duckworth, 1916. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

45Look! We Have Come Through! London: Chatto and Windus, 1917. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

46New Poems. London: Secker, 1918. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

47Bay: A Book of Poems. London: Beaumont, 1919. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

48Touch and Go. London: C. W. Daniel, 1920. Print. First performed 1973. (see The Plays)

49Women in Love. Privately published 1920. London: Secker, 1921. Eds. David Farmer, Lindeth Vasey and John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1987. Print.

50The Lost Girl. London: Secker, 1920. Ed. John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1981. Print.

51Movements in European History. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1921. Ed. Philip Crumpton. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1989. Print.

52Psychoanalysis of the Unconscious. New York: Seltzer, 1921. Psychoanalysis and the Unconscious and Fantasia of the Unconscious. Ed. Bruce Steele. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2004. Print.

53Tortoises. New York: Seltzer, 1921. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

54Sea and Sardinia. New York: Seltzer, 1921 (this first edition included eight pictures in colour by Jan Juta). Ed. Mara Kalnins. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1997. Print.

55Aaron’s Rod. New York: Seltzer, 1922. Ed. Mara Kalnins. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. Print.

56Fantasia of the Unconscious. New York: Seltzer, 1922. Print. (see Psychoanalysis and the Unconscious and Fantasia of the Unconscious)

57Studies in Classic American Literature. New York: Seltzer, 1923. Eds. Ezra Greenspan, Lindeth Vasey and John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2002. Print.

58Kangaroo. London: Secker, 1923. Ed. Bruce Steele. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994. Print.

59Birds, Beasts and Flowers. New York: Seltzer, 1923. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

60Mastro-Don Gesualdo, by Giovanni Verga. New York: Seltzer, 1923. London: Dedalus, 1999. Print.

61The Boy in the Bush. London: Secker, 1924. Ed. Paul Eggert. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1990. Print.

62Little Novels of Sicily, by Giovanni Verga. New York: Seltzer, 1925. Phoenix II: Uncollected, Unpublished, and Other Prose Works by D. H. Lawrence. Eds. Warren Roberts and Harry T. Moore. London: Heinemann, 1968. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1973. Print.

63Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine and Other Essays. Philadelphia: Centaur Press, 1925. Ed. Michael Herbert. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. Print.

64The Plumed Serpent. London: Secker, 1926. Ed. L. D. Clark. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1987. Print.

65David. London: Secker, 1926. Print. First performed 1927. (see The Plays)

66Mornings in Mexico. London: Secker, 1927. Mornings in Mexico and Other Essays. Ed. Virginia Hyde. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2009. Print.

67Cavalleria Rusticana and Other Stories, by Giovanni Verga. London: Jonathan Cape, 1928. London: Penguin, 2000. Print.

68Lady Chatterley’s Lover. Privately published in Florence, 1928. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1960. Ed. Michael Squires. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1993. The First and Second Lady Chatterley novels. Eds. Dieter Mehl and Christa Jansohn. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1999. Print.

69The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence. London: Mandrake Press, 1929. Ed. M. Levy. London: Cory, Adams & Mackay, 1964. Print.

70The Collected Poems of D. H. Lawrence. London: Secker, 1928. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

71Pansies. London: Secker, 1929. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

72Pornography and Obscenity. Criterion Miscellany 5. London: Faber & Faber, 1929. Print. (see Late Essays and Articles)

73Nettles. London: Faber & Faber, 1930. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

74Apocalypse. Florence: Orioli, 1931. Apocalypse and the Writings on Revelation. Ed. Mara Kalnins. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1980. Print.

75Etruscan Places. London: Secker, 1932. Sketches of Etruscan Places and Other Italian Essays. Ed. Simonetta de Filippis. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1992. Print.

76Last Poems. Florence: Orioli, 1932. Print. (see D. H. Lawrence: The Poems)

77The Fight for Barbara. Argosy 14.91 (1933): 68-90. Print. First performed 1967. (see The Plays)

78A Collier’s Friday Night. London: Secker, 1934. Print. First performed 1939. (see The Plays)

79The Married Man. Virginia Quarterly Review 16 (Autumn 1940): 523-47. Print. First performed 1997. (see The Plays)

80The Merry-go-round. Virginia Quarterly Review Christmas Issue (Winter 1941). Print. First performed 1973. (see The Plays)

81Mr. Noon. Part I. A Modern Lover. New York: Viking, 1934. Phoenix II. Parts I and II. Ed. Lindeth Vasey. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1984. Print.

82The Escaped Cock. Ed. Gerald Lacy. Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, 1976. Print.

83The Letters of D. H. Lawrence. Ed. James T. Boulton, George J. Zytaruk, Andrew Robertson, et al. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1979-2001. 8 vols. Print.

84Quetzalcoatl. Written 1923. Introd. Louis Martz. New York: New Directions, 1995. Ed. N. H. Reeve. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2015. Print.

85Paul Morel. Written 1911–12. Ed. Helen Baron. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. Print.

86Introductions and Reviews. Eds. N. H. Reeve and John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2004. Print.

87Late Essays and Articles. Ed. James T. Boulton. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2004. 2 vols. Print.

III. A selection of studies of the short stories

88Abolin, Nancy. “Lawrence’s ‘The Blind Man’: The Reality of Touch.” A D. H. Lawrence Miscellany. Ed. Harry T. Moore. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1959. 215-30. Print.

89Adelman, Gary S. “Beyond the Pleasure Principle: An Analysis of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Prussian Officer’.” Studies in Short Fiction 1 (1964): 8-15. Print.

90Alexandre-Garner, Corinne. “The Captain’s Doll ou le ravissement de la langue.” Études Lawrenciennes 8 (1992): 21-34. Print.

91---. “‘The Man Who Loved Islands’; ou l’effacement de la trace.” Études Lawrenciennes 2 (1988): 91-106. Print.

92Amon, Frank. “D. H. Lawrence and the Short Story.” The Achievement of D. H. Lawrence. Eds. Frederick J. Hoffman and Harry T. Moore. U of Oklahoma P, 1953. 222-34. Print. [Studies “The Rocking-Horse Winner.”]

93Anderson, Walter E. “‘The Prussian Officer’: Lawrence’s Version of the Fall of Man Legend.” Essays in Literature 12 (1985): 215-23. Print.

94Appleman, Philip. “One of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘Autobiographical Characters’.” Modern Fiction Studies 2 (1956-7): 237-38. Print. [Focuses on “The Shades of Spring.”]

95Aquien, Pascal. “Le visage et la voix dans ‘The Lovely Lady’.” Études Lawrenciennes 2 (1988): 71-80. Print.

96Baim, Joseph. “Past and Present in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘A Fragment of Stained Glass’.” Studies in Short Fiction 8 (1971): 323-26. Print.

97---. “The Second Coming of Pan: A Note on D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Last Laugh’.” Studies in Short Fiction 6 (Autumn 1968): 98-100. Print.

98Baker, P. G. “By the Help of Certain Notes: A Source for D. H. Lawrence’s ‘A Fragment of Stained Glass’.” Studies in Short Fiction 17 (1980): 317-26. Print.

99Balbert, Peter.” Courage at the Border-Line: Baider, Hemingway and Lawrence’s The Captain’s Doll.” Papers on Language & Literature 42.3 (2006): 227-63. Print.

100---. “Freud, Frazer, and Lawrence’s Palimpsestic Novella: Dreams and the Heaviness of Male Destiny in The Fox.” Studies in the Novel 38.2 (2006): 211-33. Print.

101---. “From Panophilia to Phallophobia: Sublimation and Projection in D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” Papers on Language and Literature 49.1 (2013): 37-69. Print.

102---. “Pan and the Appleyness of Landscape: Dread of the Procreative Body in ‘The Princess’.” Studies in the Novel 34.3 (2002): 282-302. Print.

103---. “Snake’s Eye and Obsedian Knife: Art, Ideology and ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 18 (1985-86): 255-73. Print.

104---. “Scorched Ego, the Novel, and the Beast: Patterns of Fourth Dimensionality in ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’.” Papers on Language and Literature 29.4 (1993): 395-416. Print.

105---. “Thirteen Ways of Looking at The Ladybird: D. H. Lawrence, Lady Cynthia Asquith, and the Incremental Structure of Seduction.” Studies in the Humanities 36.1 (2009): 15-49. Print.

106---, and Phillip L. Marcus, eds. D. H. Lawrence: A Centenary Consideration. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1982. Print [A section deals with The Ladybird and St. Mawr.]

107Baldeshwiler, Eileen. “The Lyric Short Story: The Sketch of a History.” Studies in Short Fiction 6 (Summer 1969): 443-53. Print. [Discusses “The Blind Man” and “The Christening.”]

108Banerjee, Ria. “The Search for Pan: Difference and Morality in D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr and ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 37.1 (2012): 65-89. Print.

109Barker, Anne Darling. “The Fairy Tale and St. Mawr.” Forum for Modern Language Studies 20.1 (1984): 76-83. Print.

110Barrett, Gerald, and Thomas L. Erskine. From Fiction to Film: D. H. Lawrence’s “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” Encino and Belmont: Dickenson 1974. Print.

111Barry, Peter. “Stylistics and the Logic of Intuition: or, How Not to Pick a Chrysanthemum.” Critical Quarterly 27 (Winter 1985): 51-58. Print.

112Beauchamp, Gorman. “Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Explicator 31 (1973): item 32. Print.

113Becker, George. D. H. Lawrence. New York: Ungar, 1980. Print. [Includes a section giving an overview of the main short stories.]

114Becker, Henry. “‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’: Film as Parable.” Literature/Film Quarterly 1 (1973): 55-63. Print.

115Bentley, Greg. “Hester and the Homo-social Order: An Uncanny Search for Subjectivity in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 34-35 (2010): 55-74. Print.

116Bergler, Edmund. “D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox and the Psychoanalytic Theory on Lesbianism.” A D. H. Lawrence Miscellany. Ed. Harry T. Moore. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1959. 49-55. Print.

117Betsky-Zweig, Sarah. “Floutingly in the Fine Black Mud: D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” Dutch Quarterly Review 3 (1973): 159-65. Print.

118Birgy, Philippe. “‘The Victim and the Sacrificial Knife’: Lawrence’s Transatlantic Fantasies in ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” Journal of the Short Story in English/Les Cahiers de la nouvelle 61 (2013): 33-48. Print. http://jsse.revues.org/​1372 Web. 14 March 2017.

119Black, Michael. D. H. Lawrence: The Early Fiction, a Commentary. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1986. Print.

120---. Lawrence’s England: The Major Fiction, 1913-20. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2001. Print. [A chapter is devoted to “England, My England.”]

121---. “Lawrence’s Language of Metaphor: St. Mawr as source.” Études Lawrenciennes 19 (1999): 81-96. Print.

122Blanchard, Lydia. “D. H. Lawrence.” Critical Survey of Short Fiction. Vol. 5. Ed. Frank N. Magill. Englewood Cliffs: Salem Press, 1981. 1788-1794. Print.

123---. “Mothers and Daughters in D. H. Lawrence: The Rainbow and Selected Shorter Works.” Lawrence and Women. Ed. Anne Smith. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1978. 75-100. Print. [Deals with “Mother and Daughter” and St. Mawr.]

124Blayac, Alain. “Guerre et guerres dans ‘England, My England’.” Études Lawrenciennes 2 (1988): 17-36. Print.

125Bloom, Harold, ed. Bloom’s Major Short Story Writers: D. H. Lawrence. Bromall: Chelsea House, 2001. Print.

126Blythe, Hal, and Charlie Sweet. “Lawrence’s ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” The Explicator 60.3 (2002): 154. Print.

127Bodenheimer, Rosemarie. “St. Mawr, A Passage to India, and the Question of Influence.” D. H. Lawrence Review 13 (1980): 134-49. Print.

128Booth, Howard J. New D. H. Lawrence. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2009. Print. [Contains a chapter devoted to Lawrence’s late short stories.]

129---. “Same-Sex Desire, Cross-Gender Identification and Asexuality in D. H. Lawrence’s Early Short Fiction.” Études Lawrenciennes 42 (2011): 36-57. Print.

130Boren, James L. “Commitment and Futility in The Fox.” University of Kansas City Review 31 (1965): 301-04. Print.

131Boulton, James T. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’: An Early Version.” Renaissance and Modern Studies 13.1 (1969): 4-48. Print.

132Brault-Dreux, Elise. Le “je” et ses masques dans la poésie de D. H. Lawrence. Villeneuve d’Ascq: Presses Universitaires du Septentrion, 2014. Print. [Traces parallels between Lawrence’s poems and St. Mawr and “The Man Who Died,” passim]

133Brayfield, Peg. “Lawrence’s ‘Male and Female Principles’ and the Symbolism of The Fox.” Mosaic 4.3 (1971): 41-51. Print.

134Breen, Judith P. “D. H. Lawrence, World War I and the Battle Between the Sexes: A Reading of ‘The Blind Mind’ and ‘Tickets, Please’.” Women’s Studies 13 (1986): 63-74. Print.

135Bricout, Shirley. “Bankruptcy in ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” Journal of D. H. Lawrence Studies 4.2 (2016): 139-42. Print.

136---. “Le sacrifice du langage dans ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’ de D. H. Lawrence.” Études britanniques contemporaines 42 (2012): 37-50. Print.

137Brown, Christopher. “The Eyes Have it: Vision in The Fox.” Wascana Review 15.2 (1980): 61-68. Print.

138Brown, Keith. “Welsh Red Indians: D. H. Lawrence and St. Mawr.” Essays in Criticism 32 (1982): 158-79. Print.

139Butler, Gerald J. “‘The Man Who Died’ and Lawrence’s Final Attitude towards Tragedy.” Recovering Literature 6.3 (1977): 1-14. Print.

140Carriker, Kitti. Created in Our Image: The Miniature Body of the Doll as Subject and Object. Bethlehem: Lehigh UP, 1998. Print. [Discusses The Captain’s Doll.]

141Carter, Courtney M. “Journey Toward the Center: A Jungian Analysis of Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” D. H. Lawrence Review 26.1-3 (1995-96): 65-78. Print.

142Chua, Cheng Lok. “Lawrence’s ‘The Shadow in the Rose Garden’.” Explicator 37.1 (1978): 23-24. Print.

143Clark, L. D. “Lawrence’s ‘Maya’ Drawing for Sun.” D. H. Lawrence Review 15 (1982): 141-146. Print.

144Clausson, Nils. “Practicing Deconstruction, Again: Blindness, Insight and the Lovely Treachery of Words in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Blind Man’.” College Literature 34.1 (2007): 106-28. Print.

145Cluysenaar, Anne. Introduction to Literary Stylistics: A Discussion of Dominant Structures in Verse and Prose. London: Batsford, 1976. Print. [Analyses “The Blind Man.”]

146Conde, Silvestre, and Juan Camilo. “‘A Lesson on a Tortoise’ and D. H. Lawrence’s Earliest Crisis of Social Identity.” Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses 7 (1994): 47-54. Print.

147Consolo, Dominic P., ed. “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” Columbus: Charles E. Merrill, 1969. Print. [A collection of essays on this one short story.]

148Contreras, Sheila. “‘These were just natives to her’: Chilchui Indians and ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 25.1-3 (1993-94): 91-103. Print.

149Core, Deborah. “‘The Closed Door’: Love Between Women in the Works of D. H. Lawrence.” D. H. Lawrence Review 11 (1978): 114-31. Print. [Also deals with The Fox.]

150Coroneos, Con and Trudi Tate. “Lawrence’s Tales.” The Cambridge Companion to D. H. Lawrence. Ed. Anne Fernihough. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001. 103-18. Print.

151Cowan, James. D. H. Lawrence’s American Journey: A Study in Literature and Myth. Cleveland: Press of Case Western Reserve U, 1970. Print. [Discusses “The Border-Line,” “The Flying Fish,” “Jimmy and the Desperate Woman,” The Last Laugh,” “The Man Who Died,” “The Princess,” “Smile,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

152---. “D. H. Lawrence’s Dualism: The Apollonian-Dionysian Polarity and The Ladybird.” Forms of Modern British Fiction. Ed. Alan W. Friedman. Austin: Texas UP, 1975. 73-99. Print.

153---. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Princess’ as Ironic Romance.” Studies in Short Fiction 4.3 (Spring 1967): 245-51. Print.

154---. “The Function of Allusions and Symbols in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Died’.” American Imago 17 (1960): 241-53. Print.

155---. “Lawrence and Touch.” D. H. Lawrence Review 18.2-3 (1985-86): 121-37. Print. [Argues how touch is a medium to communicate empathy in “You Touched Me.”]

156---. “Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Explicator 27 (1968): item 9. Print.

157---. “Phobia and Psychological Development in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Torn in the Flesh’.” The Modernists: Studies in Literary Phenomenon: Essays in Honor of Harry T. Moore. Eds. Lawrence B. Gamache and Ian S. MacNiven. London: Associated UP, 1987. 163-70. Print.

158Craig, David. The Real Foundations: Literature and Social Change. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1974. Print. [Includes comments on The Captain’s Doll, “Daughters of the Vicar,” St. Mawr and “The Virgin and the Gipsy.”]

159Crick, Brian. The Story of “The Prussian Officer” Revisions: Littlewood Amongst the Lawrence Scholars. Retford: Brynmill Press, 1983. Print.

160Crowder, A.B., and L. Crowder. “Mythic Intent in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’.” South Atlantic Review 49.2 (1984): 61-66. Print.

161Crowley, Cornelius. “Living On, Desired Ends: The Poetics of Travel in Four Lawrence Stories.” Études Lawrenciennes 36 (2007): 9-29. Print. [Focuses on “The Border-Line,” “England, My England,” Sun and “Things.”]

162Crump, G. B. “The Fox on film.” D. H. Lawrence Review 1 (Autumn 1968): 238-44. Print.

163---. “Gopher Prairie or Papplewick?: ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’ as Film.” D. H. Lawrence Review 4 (1971): 142-153. Print.

164Cushman, Keith. “The Achievement of England, My England and Other Stories.DHL The Man who Lived. Eds. Robert B. Partlow Jr. and Harry T. Moore. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1980. 27-38. Print.

165---. “‘A Bastard Begot’: The Origins of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Christening’.” Modern Philology 70 (1972): 146-48. Print.

166---. “Blind, Intertextual Love: ‘The Blind Man’ and Raymond Carver’s ‘Cathedral’.” D. H. Lawrence’s Literary Inheritors. Eds. Dennis Jackson and Keith Cushman. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991. 155-66. Print.

167---. D.H. Lawrence at Work – The Emergence of the ‘Prussian Officer’ Stories. Hassocks: Harvester Press, 1978. Print.

168---. “D.H. Lawrence at Work: from ‘Vin Ordinaire’ to ‘The Thorn in the Flesh’.” Journal of Modern Literature 5.1 (February 1976): 46-58. Print.

169---. “D. H. Lawrence at Work: The Making of ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” Journal of Modern Literature 2.3 (1971-1972): 367-92. Print.

170---. “D. H. Lawrence at Work: ‘The Shadow in the Rose Garden’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 8 (Spring 1975): 31-46. Print.

171---. “Domestic Life in the Suburbs: Lawrence, the Joneses and ‘The Old Adam’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 16 (1983): 221-34. Print.

172---. “Ghosts and Fighting Celts in “The Border-Line’.” Études Lawrenciennes 23 (2000): 93-107. Print.

173---. “‘I am going through a transition stage’: ‘The Prussian Officer’ and The Rainbow.” D. H. Lawrence Review 8 (Summer 1975): 176-97. Print.

174---. “‘I wish that story at the bottom of the sea’: The Making and Re-Making of ‘England, My England’.” Études Lawrenciennes 46 (2015). Web. 14 March 2017. DOI: 10.4000/lawrence.235

175---. “Lawrence’s Use of Hardy in ‘The Shades of Spring’.” Studies in Short Fiction 9 (Autumn 1972): 402-04. Print.

176---. “The Making of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The White Stocking’.” Studies in Short Fiction 10 (1973): 51-65. Print.

177---. “The Making of ‘The Prussian Officer’: A Correction.” D. H. Lawrence Review 4 (1971): 263-73. Print.

178---. “A Note on Lawrence’s ‘Fly in the Ointment’.” English Language Notes 15 (1977): 47-51. Print.

179---. “The Serious Comedy of ‘Things’.” Études Lawrenciennes 6 (1991): 83-94. Print.

180---. “The Virgin and the Gypsy and The Lady and the Gamekeeper.” D. H. Lawrence’s Lady: A New Look at Lady Chatterley’s Lover. Eds. Michael Squires and Dennis Jackson. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1985. 154-69. Print.

181---. “The Young Lawrence and the Short Story.” Modern British Literature 3.2 (1978): 101-12. Print;

182---, and Earl G. Ingersoll, eds. D. H. Lawrence: New Worlds. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2003. Print. [Contains a chapter devoted to “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

183---, and Michael Squires, eds. The Challenge of D. H. Lawrence. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1990. Print. [Contains a section on The Captain’s Doll and The Fox.]

184D. H. Lawrence’s Short Fiction, special issue of the D. H. Lawrence Review 16.3, 1983. Print.

185Daalder, Joost. “Background and Significance of D. H. Lawrence’s The Ladybird.” D. H. Lawrence Review 15 (1982): 107-28. Print.

186Daleski, H. M. “Aphrodite of the Foam in The Ladybird Tales.” D. H. Lawrence: A Critical Study of the Major Novels and Other Writings. Ed. A. H. Gomme. Hassocks: Harvester Press, 1978. 142-59. Print.

187Dataller, Roger. “Mr. Lawrence and Mrs. Woolf.” Essays in Criticism 8 (1958): 48-59. Print. [Discusses revisions in two stories: “The Prussian Officer” and “The Thorn in the Flesh.”]

188Davies, Rosemary. “D. H. Lawrence and the theme of rebirth.” D. H. Lawrence Review 14 (1981): 127-42. Print.

189---. “From Heat to Radiance: The Language of ‘The Prussian Officer’.” Studies in Short Fiction 21 (1984): 269-71. Print.

190---. “Lawrence, Lady Cynthia Asquith, and ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Studies in Short Fiction 20 (1983): 121-26. Print.

191---. “‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’ again: A Correction.” Studies in Short Fiction 18 (1981): 320-22. Print.

192Davis, Patricia. “Chicken Queen’s Delight: D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox.” Modern Fiction Studies 19 (1973): 565-71. Print.

193Dawson, Eugene W. “Love Among the Mannikins: The Captain’s Doll.”
D. H. Lawrence Review 1 (Summer 1968): 137-48. Print.

194De Filippis, Simonetta. “Eros and Thanatos in D. H. Lawrence’s Amerindian Tales.” Études Lawrenciennes 23 (2000): 7-23. Print.

195---, and Nick Ceramella, eds. D. H. Lawrence and Literary Genres. Naples: Loffredo, 2004. Print. [A section is devoted to romance in some of the short stories, in particular Sun, another offers a reading of “Odour of Chrysanthemums.”]

196Delany, Paul. “‘We shall know each other now’: Message and Code in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Blind Man’.” Contemporary Literature 26 (1985): 26-39. Print.

197---. “Who was ‘The Blind Man’?” English Studies in Canada 9 (1983): 92-99. Print.

198Delavenay, Emile. D. H. Lawrence: The Man and His Work, the Formative Years, 1885-1919. London: Heinemann, 1972. Print. [Discusses “The Blind Man,” “The Christening,” “England, My England,” “Love Among the Haystacks,” and “The Shades of Spring.”]

199---. “D. H. Lawrence and Sacher-Masoch.” D. H. Lawrence Review 6 (Summer 1973): 119-48. Print. [Discusses “The Shades of Spring.”]

200Denny, N. “The Ladybird.” Theoria 11 (1958): 17-28. Print.

201Devlin, Albert J. “The ‘Strange and Fiery’ Course of The Fox: D. H. Lawrence’s Aesthetic of Composition and Revision.” The Spirit of D. H. Lawrence: Centenary Studies. Eds. Gāmini Salgādo and G. K. Das. London: Macmillan, 1988. 75-91. Print.

202Dexter, Martin. “D. H. Lawrence and Pueblo Religion: An Inquiry into Accuracy.” Arizona Quarterly 9 (Autumn 1953): 219-34. Print.

203Díez-Medrano, Conchita. “Breaking Moulds, Smashing Mirrors: The Intertextaul Dynamics of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Lovely Lady’.” Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses 9 (1996): 91-103. Print.

204---. “Fictions of Rape: The Teller and the Tale in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘None of That’.” Forum for Modern Language Studies 32.4 (1996): 303-13. Print.

205---. “Narrative Voice and Point of View in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘Samson and Delilah’.” Essays in Literature 1 (Spring 1995): 87-96. Print.

206Doherty, Gerald. “The Art of Survival: Narrating the Nonnarratable in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’.” D. H. Lawrence Review. 24 (Autumn 1992): 117-26. Print.

207---. “D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox: A Question of Species.” D. H. Lawrence Review 37.2 (2012): 1-21. Print.

208---. “The Greatest Show on Earth: D. H. Lawrence’s St Mawr and Antonin Artaud’s Theater of Cruelty.” D. H. Lawrence Review 22.1 (1990): 5-20. Print.

209---. “The Third Encounter: Paradigms of Courtship in D. H. Lawrence’s Shorter Fiction.” D. H. Lawrence Review 17 (1984): 135-51. Print. [Discusses “The Virgin and the Gipsy” and The Fox]

210---. “A ‘Very Funny’ Story: Figural Play in D. H. Lawrence’s The Captain’s Doll.” D. H. Lawrence Review 18.1 (1985-86): 5-17. Print.

211Draper, R. P. “The Defeat of Feminism; D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox and ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” Studies in Short Fiction 3 (Winter 1966): 186-98. Print.

212---. D. H. Lawrence. New York: Twayne, 1964. Print. [Refers to “England, My England,” “Hadrian” The Fox, “The Man Who Died,” “The Man Who Loved Islands,” “The Princess,” “The Prussian Officer” stories, “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” “Things,” “The Virgin and the Gipsy,” and to “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

213---. “D. H. Lawrence on Mother-Love.” Essays in Criticism 8 (1958): 285-89. Print. [Discusses “The Rocking-Horse Winner.”]

214---. “The Sense of Reality in the Work of D. H. Lawrence.” Revue des Langues Vivantes 23 (1967): 461-70. Print. [On “Love Among the Haystacks.”]

215Dufour, Françoise. “‘Sun’: Nouvelle, essai ou poème ?” Études Lawrenciennes 2 (1988): 59-70. Print.

216Earl, G. A. “Correspondence.” Cambridge Quarterly 1.3 (1965): 273-75. Print. [Discusses “Daughters of the Vicar.”]

217Ebbatson, Roger. “‘England, My England’: Lawrence, War and Nation.” Literature and History 9.1 (2000): 67-82. Print.

218Edwards, Duane. “The Objectivity of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” Southern Humanities Review 39.3 (2005): 205-22. Print.

219Eggert, Paul, and John Worthen. Lawrence and Comedy. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1996. Print. [A chapter is devoted to St. Mawr.]

220Ellis, David, and Ornella de Zordo, eds. D.H. Lawrence: Critical Assessments. Mountfield: Helm Information, 1992. 4 vols. Print. [In vol. 3, this collection of previously published articles is devoted to most of the short stories.]

221Emmett, V. J., Jr. “Structural Irony in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Connecticut Review 5 (1972): 5-10. Print.

222Engel, Monroe. “The Continuity of Lawrence’s Short Novels.” D. H. Lawrence: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Mark Spilka. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1963. 93-100. Print. [About The Captain’s Doll, The Fox, The Ladybird, St. Mawr.]

223---. “Knowing More Than One Imagines: Imagining More Than One Knows.” Agni 31-32 (1990): 165-176. Print. [Draws parallels between Raymond Carver’s “Cathedral” and “The Blind Man”.]

224Englander, Ann. “‘The Prussian Officer’: The Self Divided.” Sewanee Review 71 (Autumn 1963): 605-19. Print.

225Faderman, Lillian. “Lesbian Magazine Fiction in the Early Twentieth Century.” Journal of Popular Culture 11 (1978): 800-17. Print. [Discusses The Fox.]

226Fadiman, Regina. “The Poet as Choreographer: Lawrence’s ‘The Blind Man’.” Journal of Narrative Technique 2 (1972): 60-67. Print.

227Fambrough, Preston. “The Sexual Landscape of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Princess’.” CLA Journal 53.3 (2010): 286-301. Print.

228Faustino, Daniel. “Psychic Rebirth and Christian Imagery in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” Journal of Evolutionary Psychology 9 (1989): 105-108. Print.

229Fernihough, Anne, ed. The Cambridge Companion to D. H. Lawrence. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001. Print. [Sections are devoted to “The Prussian Officer” and to an overview of the short stories and novellas]

230Ferretter, Luke. The Glyph and the Gramophone: D. H. Lawrence’s Religions. London: Bloomsbury, 2013. Print. [Traces how Lawrence expresses his own religious beliefs in “The Escaped Cock,” St. Mawr and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

231Fiderer, Gerald. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Died’: The Phallic Christ.” American Imago 25 (Spring 1968): 91-96. Print.

232Finney, Brian. “D. H. Lawrence’s Progress to Maturity: From Holograph Manuscript to Final Publication of The Prussian Officer and Other Stories.” Studies in Bibliography 28 (1975): 21-32. Print.

233---. “The Hitherto Unknown Publication of some D. H. Lawrence Short Stories.” Notes and Queries 19 (1972): 55-56. Print. [Mentions “The Blue Moccasins,” The Fox, “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” and “Smile.”]

234---. “Introduction.” The Prussian Officer and Other Stories. Ed. John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1983. xiii-xxxiii. Print.

235---. “A Newly Discovered Text of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Lovely Lady’.” Yale University Library Gazette 49 (1975): 245-60. Print.

236---. “Two Missing Pages from The Ladybird.” Review of English Studies 24 (1973): 191-92. Print.

237---, and Michael Ross. “The Two Versions of ‘Sun’: An exchange.” D. H. Lawrence Review 8 (1975): 371-74. Print.

238Fitz, L. T. “‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’ and The Golden Bough.” Studies in Short Fiction 11 (1974): 199-200. Print.

239Ford, George H. Double Measure: A Study of the Novels and Stories of
D. H. Lawrence
. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1965. Print.

240Foster, Jane. D. H. Lawrence: Symbolic landscapes. Kent: Joe’s Press, 1994. Print. [Highlights Lawrence’s symbols in many of the short stories, as well as the major novels.]

241Fowles, John. “The Man Who Died’: A Commentary.” Wormholes: Essays and Occasional Writings. Ed. Jan Relf. London: Jonathan Cape, 1998. 228-40. Print.

242Fox, Elizabeth. “André Grenn’s ‘The Dead Mother’ and D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Études Lawrenciennes 39 (2009): 151-62. Print.

243---. “Mirroring in ‘The Prussian Officer’: Lacanian Reflections in Lawrence.” Études Lawrenciennes 34 (2007): 59-76. Print.

244Franks, Jill. Islands and the Modernists: The Allure of Isolation in Art, Literature and Science. Jefferson: McFarland, 2006. Print. [A section deals with “The Man Who Loved Islands.”]

245---. Revisionist Resurrection Mythologies: A Study of D. H. Lawrence’s Italian Works. New Yok: Peter Lang, 1994. Print. [Includes remarks on “The Man Who Died,” Sun, and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

246Freije, George F. “Equine Names in ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” CEA Critic 51.4 (1989): 75-84. Print.

247Friedman, Alan W. Forms of Modern British Fiction. Austin: Texas UP, 1975. Print. [A chapter is devoted to The Ladybird.]

248Fulmer, O. Bryan. “The Significance of the Death of the Fox in D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox.” Studies in Short Fiction 5 (Spring 1968): 275-82. Print.

249Gamache, Lawrence B., and Ian S. MacNiven, eds. The Modernists: Studies in Literary Phenomenon: Essays in Honor of Harry T. Moore. London: Associated UP, 1987. Print. [A chapter is devoted to ‘The Thorn in the Flesh.”]

250Game, David. D. H. Lawrence’s Australia: Anxiety at the Edge of Empire. London: Routledge, 2016. Print. [Sections trace Lawrence’s engagement with Australia in “The Vicar’s Garden,” “The Primrose Path” and St. Mawr.]

251Garcia, Reloy, and James Karabataos, eds. A Concordance to the Short Fiction of D. H. Lawrence. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 1972. Print. [A word index to Lawrence’s short stories and novellas.]

252Gavin, Adrienne. “Marginalization and Colonization: Literary Criticism of D. H. Lawrence’s Short Stories.” Études Lawrenciennes 23 (2000): 135-48. Print.

253Gidley, Mick. “Antipodes: D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” Ariel 5 (1974): 25-41. Print.

254Gilbert, Sandra. “Costumes of the Mind: Transvestism as Metapohr in Modern Literature.” Critical Enquiry 7 (1980): 391-417. Print. [Discusses The Fox.]

255---. “Potent Griselda: The Ladybird and the Great Mother.” D. H. Lawrence: A Centenary Consideration. Eds. Peter Balbert and Phillip L. Marcus. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1982. 130-161. Print.

256Giles, Steve. “Marxism and Form: D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” Literary Theory at Work: Three Texts. Ed. Douglas Tallack. London: Batsford, 1987. 49-66. Print.

257Goldberg, Michael. “Dickens and Lawrence: More on Rocking-Horses.” Modern Fiction Studies 27 (Winter 1971-2): 574-75. Print.

258---. “Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’: A Dickensian Fable?” Modern Fiction Studies 15 (Winter 1969): 525-36. Print.

259Gomme, A. H., ed. D. H. Lawrence: A Critical Study of the Major Novels and Other Writings. Hassocks: Harvester Press, 1978. Print. [Sections are devoted to “England, My England,” to The Ladybird and to The Fox.]

260Gontarski, S. E. “Christopher Miles on his Making of ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’.” Literature/Film Quarterly 11 (1983): 249-56. Print.

261---. “Mark Rydell and the Filming of The Fox.” Modernist Studies 4 (1982): 96-104. Print.

262Good, Jan. “Toward a Resolution of Gender Identity Confusion: The Relationship of Henry and March in The Fox.” D. H. Lawrence Review 18.2-3 (1985-86): 217-27. Print.

263Goodheart, Eugene. “Lawrence and Christ.” Partisan Review 31 (Winter 1964): 42-59. Print. [Discusses “The Man Who Died.”]

264---. The Utopian Vision of D. H. Lawrence. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1963. Print. [Discusses The Fox, “The Man Who Died,” St. Mawr and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

265Goodman, Charlotte. “Henry James, D. H. Lawrence and the Victimized Child.” Modern Language Studies 10.1 (1979-80): 43-51. Print. [Traces similarities between “The Author of Beltraffio” and “England My England,” and between “The Pupil” and “The Rocking-horse Winner."]

266Gouirand-Rousselon, Jacqueline. “D. H. Lawrence after a phallic Christ: The Resurrection into Touch in ‘The Man Who Died’.” Études Lawrenciennes 23 (2000): 45-59. Print.

267---. “Passages: from hibernation to Awakening (March in The Fox). The Phallic Parade and Woman in Question.” Études Lawrenciennes 17 (1998): 121-37. Print.

268---. “Power, Will and the Phallic Order in The Fox and The Ladybird.” Études Lawrenciennes 40 (2008): 119-32. Print.

269Granofsky, Ronald. D. H. Lawrence and Survival: Darwinism in the Fiction of the Transitional Period. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s UP, 2003. Print. [Sections are devoted to The Captain’s Doll and The Ladybird novellas and to the stories of England, My England.]

270---. “Illness and Wellness in D. H. Lawrence’s The Ladybird.” Orbis Litterarum 51.2 (1996): 99-117. Print.

271---. “A Second Caveat: D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox.” English Studies in Canada 15.1 (1988): 49-63. Print.

272---. “Survival of the Fittest in Lawrence’s The Captain’s Doll.” D. H. Lawrence Review 27.1 (1997-98): 27-46. Print.

273Gregor, Ian. “The Fox: A Caveat.” Essays in Criticism 9 (1959): 10-21. Print.

274Greiff, Louis K. “Bittersweet Dreaming in Lawrence’s The Fox: A Freudian Perspective.” Studies in Short Fiction 20 (1983): 7-16. Print.

275---. “Variations on a Theme by D. H. Lawrence: ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’ as Experimental Cinema.” Études Lawrenciennes 23 (2000): 109-114. Print.

276Grenander, M. E., ed. Helios: From Myth to Solar Energy. Albany: State U of New York P, 1978. Print. [A section is devoted to Lawrence’s last stories, with a particular focus on Sun.]

277Grmelová, Anna. “The Captain’s Doll: Aspects of D. H. Lawrence’s Politics and the Comic Mode.” Prague Studies in English 22 (2000): 153-160. Print.

278---. “‘The Prussian Officer’ in the Context of D. H. Lawrence’s Short Fiction.” Brno Studies in English 24 (1998): 141-146. Print.

279---. The Worlds of D. H. Lawrence’s Short Fiction. Prague: Karolinum, 2001. Print.

280Gunnarsdottir-Campion, Margret. “The ‘something-else’: Ethical Ecriture in D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” D. H. Lawrence Review 36.2 (2011): 43-71. Print.

281Gurko, Leo. “D. H. Lawrence’s Greatest Collection of Short Stories – What Holds it Together.” Modern Fiction Studies 18 (1972): 173-82. Print. [Discusses the aesthetic value of the novellas.]

282Gutierrez, Donald. “The Ancient Imagination of D. H. Lawrence.” Twentieth Century Literature 27 (1981): 178-96. Print. [Traces hylozoistic concepts in St. Mawr.]

283---. “Getting Even with John Middleton Murry.” Interpretations 15.1 (1983): 31-38. Print. [Discusses “The Border-Line,” “Jimmy and the Desperate Woman,” and “The Last Laugh.”]

284---. Lapsing out: Embodiments of Death and Rebirth in the Last Writings of D. H. Lawrence. London: Associated UP, 1980. Print. [A section focuses on “The Virgin and the Gipsy” but the study also includes discussions of “The Man Who Died.”]

285Guttenberg, Barnett. “Realism and Romance in Lawrence’s ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’.” Studies in Short Fiction 17 (1980): 99-103. Print.

286Haegert, John W. “D. H. Lawrence and the Aesthetics of Transgression.” Modern Philology 88 (1990): 2-25. Print.

287---. “Lawrence’s St. Mawr and the De-Creation of America.” Criticism 34 (1992): 75-98. Print.

288Halperin, Irving. “Unity in St. Mawr.” South Dakota Review 4 (1966): 58-60. Print.

289Harris, Janice Hubbard. “Insight and experiment in D. H. Lawrence’s Early Short Fiction.” Philological Quarterly 55 (1976): 418-35. Print.

290---. “The Many Faces of Lazarus: ‘The Man Who Died’ and its Context.”
D. H. Lawrence Review 16 (1983): 291-311. Print.

291---. “The Moulting of The Plumed Serpent: A Study of the Relationship Between the Novel and Three Contemporary Tales.” Modern Language Quarterly 39 (1978): 154-68. Print. [The relationship with St Mawr in particular]

292---. The Short Fiction of D. H. Lawrence. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1984. Print.

293Harrison, Andrew. D. H. Lawrence: Selected Short Stories. Tirril: Humanities-Ebooks, 2008. Print. [Provides a background for the writing of the short stories together with a selected bibliography for each.]

294Hendrick, George. “Jesus and the Osiris-Isis Myth: Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Died’ and Williams’s The Night of the Iguana.” Anglia 84 (1966): 398-406. Print.

295Herzinger, Kim. D. H. Lawrence in His Time: 1908-1915. London: Associated UP, 1982. Print. [Refers to “England, My England.”]

296Hildick, Wallace. Word for Word: The Rewriting of Fiction. New York: Norton, 1965. Print. [A section is devoted to “Odour of Chrysanthemums.”]

297Hinz, Evelyn J., and John J. Teunissen. “Savior and Cock: Allusion and Icon in Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Died’.” Journal of Modern Literature 5.2 (1976): 279-96. Print.

298Hirsch, Gordon D. “The Laurentian Double: Images of D. H. Lawrence in the Stories.” D. H. Lawrence Review 10.3 (1977): 270-76. Print.

299Hoffman Frederick J. and Harry T. Moore, eds. The Achievement of D. H. Lawrence. Oklahoma: U of Oklahoma P, 1953. Print. [A section gives an overview of Lawrence’s short stories.]

300Hollington, Michael. “Lawrentian Gothic and ‘the Uncanny’.” Anglophonia 15 (2004): 171-84. Print. [Discusses the short stories written between 1924 and 1928.]

301Hough, Graham. The Dark Sun: A Study of D. H. Lawrence. London: Duckworth 1956. Print. [Discusses The Captain’s Doll, “England, My England,” The Fox, “Hadrian,” “The Man Who Died,” “The Princess,” “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” St. Mawr, “The Virgin and the Gipsy,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

302---. “Lawrence’s Quarrel With Christianity: ‘The Man Who Died’.” D. H. Lawrence: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Mark Spilka. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1963. 101-11. Print.

303Howard, Daniel F. A Manual to Accompany the Modern Tradition: An Anthology of Short Stories. Boston: Little & Brown, 1968. Print. [Introduces “The Prussian Officer.”]

304Hudspeth, Robert N. “Duality as Theme and Technique in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Border-Line’.” Studies in Short Fiction 4 (Autumn 1966): 51-56. Print.

305---. “Lawrence’s ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’: Isolation and Paradox.” Studies in Short Fiction 6 (Autumn 1969): 630-36. Print.

306Humma, John B. “Lawrence’s The Ladybird and the Enabling Image.” D. H. Lawrence Review 17 (1984): 219-32. Print.

307---. “Melville’s Billy Budd and Lawrence’s ‘The Prussian Officer’: Old Adam and New.” Essays in Literature 1 (1974): 83-88. Print.

308---. “Pan and ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Essays in Literature 5 (1978): 53-60. Print.

309Hyde, Virginia. The Risen Adam: D. H. Lawrence’s Revisionist Typology. Philadelphia: Pennsylvania State UP, 1992. Print. [Discusses the influence of the Bible and Christian beliefs throughout Lawrence’s works.]

310Iida, Takeo. D. H. Lawrence as Anti-rationalist: Mysticism, Animism, and Cosmic Life in His Works. Tokyo: AoyamaLife, 2012. Print. [A section traces parallels between St. Mawr, ‘The Escaped Cock,’ and Child of the Western Isles, another contrasts animism and Christianity in St. Mawr.]

311Ingram, Allan. The Language of D. H. Lawrence. London: Macmillan, 1990. Print. [Refers to “England, My England” and to St Mawr.]

312Inniss, Kenneth. D. H. Lawrence’s Bestiary: A Study of His Use of Animal Trope and Symbol. The Hague: Mouton, 1971. Print.

313Iwai, Gaku. “Wartime Ideology in ‘The Thimble’: A Comparative Study of Popular Wartime Romance and the Anti-romance of D. H. Lawrence.Études Lawrenciennes 46 (2015). Web. 13 March 2017. DOI: 10.4000/lawrence.236

314Iyer, Pico. “Lawrence by Lightning.” American Scholar 68.4 (1999): 128-33. Print. [Studies “The Virgin and the Gipsy.”]

315Jackson, Dennis and Keith Cushman, eds. D. H. Lawrence’s Literary Inheritors. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991. Print. [Sections are devoted to “The Blind Man,” to St. Mawr and to “The Virgin and the Gipsy.”]

316---, and Fleda Brown Jackson, eds. Critical Essays on D. H. Lawrence. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1988. Print. [A section deals with “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter.”]

317Jenkins, Stephen. “The Relevance of D. H. Lawrence Today: A Study of ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” Journal of the D. H. Lawrence Society 2.1 (1979): 15-16. Print.

318Jones, Bethan. “Depravity, Abuse and Homoerotic Desire in Billy Budd and ‘The Prussian Officer’.” Journal of D. H. Lawrence Studies 42 (2016): 47-72. Print.

319---. “Disappearing Tricks: Comedy and Gender in D. H. Lawrence’s Late Short Fiction.” New D. H. Lawrence. Ed. Harold Booth. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2009. 130-47. Print.

320---. “Strife, Consummation and Consciousness in D. H. Lawrence’s Women in Love and ‘The Prussian Officer’.” Études Lawrenciennes 31 (2005): 135-50. Print.

321Jones, Lawrence. “Physiognomy and the Sensual Will in The Ladybird and The Fox.” D. H. Lawrence Review 13 (1980): 1-29. Print.

322--- and Paul Simpson-Housley. “The Dualistic Landscapes of St. Mawr.” Journal of the D. H. Lawrence Society 4.3 (1988-89): 31-40. Print.

323Joost, Nicholas, and Alvin Sullivan. D. H. Lawrence and the Dial. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1970. Print. [An account tracing how thirty of Lawrence’s works appeared in twenty-five issues of the Dial.]

324Junkins, Donald. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” Studies in Short Fiction 6 (Winter 1969): 210-13. Print.

325---. “‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’: A Modern Myth.” Studies in Short Fiction 2 (Autumn 1964): 87-89. Print.

326Kalnins, Mara, ed. D. H. Lawrence: Centenary Essays. Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1986. Print. [A section is devoted to “The Virgin and the Gipsy.”]

327---. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’: The Three Endings.” Studies in Short Fiction 13.4 (1976): 471-79. Print.

328---. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘Two Marriages’ and ‘Daughters of the Vicar’.” Ariel 7.1 (1976): 32-49. Print.

329Karl, Frederick R. “Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’: The Crusoe Who Failed.” A D. H. Lawrence Miscellany. Ed. Harry T. Moore. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1959. 265-79. Print.

330Katz-Roy, Ginette. “Tel un poisson dans l’eau: du léthal au foetal dans ‘The Flying Fish’.” Études Lawrenciennes 1 (1986): 59-72. Print.

331---. “La Transgression des frontières dans l’œuvre de D. H. Lawrence.” Dissertation, Institut du Monde Anglophone Paris III, 1995. Print.

332Kay, Wallace G. “Women in Love and ‘The Man Who Had Died’: Resolving Apollo and Dionysus.” Southern Quarterly 10 (1972): 325-39. Print.

333Kearney, Martin F. Major Short Stories of D.H. Lawrence – A Handbook. New York: Garland, 1998. Print. [Discusses “Daughters of the Vicar,” “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter,” “Odour of Chrysanthemums,” “The Prussian Officer,” “The Rocking-Horse Winner” and “The Shadow in the Rose Garden.”]

334---. “Spirit, Place and Psyche: Integral Integration in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’.” English Studies 69.2 (1988): 158-62. Print.

335Kegel-Brinkgreve E. “The Dionysian Tramline.” Dutch Quarterly Review 5 (1975): 180-94. Print. [A study of “Tickets, Please.”]

336Kendle, Burton S. “D. H. Lawrence: The Man Who Misunderstood Gulliver.” English Language Notes 2 (1964): 42-46. Print. [Discusses Swift in “The Man Who Loved Islands”]

337Kennedy, Andrew. “The Myth of Rebirth in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Died’.” Excursions in Fiction. Ed. Andrew Kennedy. Oslo: Novus, 1994. 124-30. Print.

338Kiely, Robert. “Power of the Working Class in Lawrence’s Fiction.” The Challenge of D. H. Lawrence. Eds. Keith Cushman and Michael Squires. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1990. 89-102. Print. [Discusses all the works, including the short stories, related to the mining community.]

339Kinkead-Weekes, Mark. “The Gringo Señora Who Rode Away.” D. H. Lawrence Review 22.3 (1990): 251-65. Print.

340---. “Re-dating ‘The Overtone’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 25.1-3 (1993-94): 75-80. Print.

341Koban, Charles. “Allegory and the Death of the Heart in ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Studies in Short Fiction 15 (1978): 391-96. Print.

342Koh, Jae-Kyung. D. H. Lawrence and the Great War: The Quest for Cultural Regeneration. New York: Peter Lang, 2007. Print. [Sections are devoted to The Fox and St. Mawr.]

343Kramp, Michael. “Gypsy Desire in the Land: The Decay of the English Race and Radical Nomadism in ‘The Virgin and the Gypsy’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 32-33 (2003-4): 64-86. Print.

344Krishnamurthy, M. G. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” Literary Criterion 4 (Summer 1960): 40-49. Print.

345Kunkel, Francis L. Passion and the Passion: Sex and Religion in Modern Literature. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1975. Print. [A section is devoted to “The Man Who Died.”]

346Lacy, Gerald. “Commentary.” The Escaped Cock. Ed. Gerald Lacy. Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, 1976. 121-70. Print.

347Lainoff, Seymour. “The Wartime Setting of Lawrence’s ‘Tickets, Please’.” Studies in Short Fiction 7 (Autumn 1970): 649-51. Print.

348Larsen, Elizabeth. “Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Died’.” The Explicator 40.4 (1982): 38-40. Print.

349Lawrence, D. H. “‘The Man Who Was Through with the World’: An Unfinished Story by Lawrence Introduced by John R. Elliott, Jr.” Essays in Criticism 9 (1959): 213-21. Print.

350Leavis, F. R. D. H. Lawrence: Novelist. London: Chatto & Windus, 1955. Print. [Discusses “Daughters of the Vicar,” “England, My England,” The Fox, “Hadrian,” “Fanny and Annie,” “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter,” “Mother and Daughter,” “The Princess,” St. Mawr, “The Virgin and the Gipsy,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

351---. “Lawrence and Class: ‘The Daughters of the Vicar’.” Sewanee Review 62 (Autumn 1954): 535-62. Print.

352---. Thought, Words and Creativity: Art and Thought in Lawrence. London: Chatto & Windus, 1976. Print. [A chapter is devoted to The Captain’s Doll.]

353Ledoux, Larry V. “Christ and Isis: The Function of the Dying and Reviving God in ‘The Man Who Died’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 5 (1972): 132-48. Print.

354Lee, Brian S. “The Marital Conclusions of Tennyson’s ‘Maud’ and Lawrence’s ‘England, My England’.” University of Cape Town Studies in English 12 (1982): 19-37. Print.

355Levin, Gerald. “The Symbolism of Lawrence’s The Fox.” CLA Journal 11 (1967): 135-41. Print.

356Liddell, Robert. “Lawrence and Dr Leavis: The Case of St. Mawr.” Essays in Criticism 4 (1954): 321-27. Print.

357Link, Viktor. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’ in the Light of Compton Mackenzie’s Memoirs.” D. H. Lawrence Review 15 (1982): 77-86. Print.

358Littlewood, J. C. F. D. H. Lawrence: 1885-1914. Harlow: Longman, 1976. Print. [Includes remarks on “Daughters of the Vicar.”]

359---. “Lawrence’s Early Tales.” Cambridge Quarterly 1.2 (1965-1966): 107-24. Print. [Comments on “The Prussian Officer” stories.]

360Lucas, Barbara. “A Propos of ‘England, My England’.” Twentieth Century 169 (1961): 288-93. Print.

361Lucente, Gregory L. The Narrative of Realism and Myth: Verga, Lawrence, Faulkner, Pavese. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1981. Print. [A section is devoted to “The Man Who Died” and Women in Love.]

362Lusty, Natalya, and Julian Murphet, eds. Modernism and masculinity. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2014. Print. [A chapter is devoted to The Fox.]

363Macadré-Nguyên, Brigitte. “Stripping the Veil of Familiarity from the World: D. H. Lawrence’s Art of Language in ‘The Border-Line’.” Études Lawrenciennes 44 (2013): 169-86. Print.

364MacDonald, Robert H. “Images of Negative Union: The Symbolic World of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Princess’.” Studies in Short Fiction 16 (1979): 289-93. Print.

365---. “The Union of Fire and Water: An Examination of the Imagery of ‘The Man Who Died’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 10 (1977): 34-51. Print.

366Mackenzie, D. Kenneth. “Ennui and Energy in England, My England.”
D. H. Lawrence: A Critical Study of the Major Novels and Other Writings. Ed. A. H. Gomme. Hassocks: Harvester Press, 1978. 120-41. Print.

367---. The Fox. Milton Keynes: Open UP, 1973. Print.

368Macleod, Sheila. Lawrence’s Men and Women. London: Heinemann, 1985. Print. [Includes an analysis of the major short stories]

369Magill, Frank N., ed. Critical Survey of Short Fiction. Englewood Cliffs: Salem Press, 1981. 7 vols. Print. [A section from vol. 5 is devoted to Lawrence.]

370Marks III, W. S. “D. H. Lawrence and his Rabbit Adolf: Three Symbolic Permutations.” Criticism 10.3 (1968): 200-16. Print. [Finds parallels between Paul Morel, “Adolf” and Women in Love.]

371---. “The Psychology in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Blind Man’.” Literature and Psychology 17 (Winter 1967): 177-92. Print.

372---. “The Psychology of the Uncanny in Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Modern Fiction Studies 11.4 (1965-66): 381-92. Print.

373Marshall, Timothy. “Claiming the Body: ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums,’ Death, the Great War and the Workhouse.” D. H. Lawrence Review 32-33 (2003-4): 19-35. Print.

374Martin, Dexter. “The Beauty of Blasphemy: Suggestions for Handling ‘The Escaped Cock’.” D. H. Lawrence News and Notes (February 1960). Print.

375Martin, W. R. “Fancy or Imagination? ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” College English 24 (1962): 64-65. Print.

376---. “Hannele’s ‘surrender’: A Misreading of The Captain’s Doll.” D. H. Lawrence Review 18.1 (1985-6): 19-23. Print.

377Matterson, Stephen. “Another Source for Henry? D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox.” ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews 5 (1992): 23-25. Print.

378Maybury, James F., and Marjorie A. Zerbel, eds. Franklin Pierce Studies in Literature. Rindge: Franklin Pierce College, 1982. Print. [A chapter is devoted to “England, My England.”]

379McAra, Catriona, and David Calvin, eds. Anti-tales: The Uses of Disenchantment. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011. Print. [A section is devoted to dystopian elements in “The Rocking-Horse Winner” and “A Suburban Fairy Tale” by Katherine Mansfield.]

380McCabe, Thomas H. “The Otherness of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 19.2 (1987): 149-56. Print.

381---. “Rhythm as Form in Lawrence: ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” PMLA 87.1 (1972): 64-68. Print.

382McCollum, Laurie. “Ritual Sacrifice in ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’: A Girardian Reading.” D. H. Lawrence: New Worlds. Eds. Keith Cushman and Earl G. Ingersoll. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2003. 230-42. Print.

383McDermott, John V. “Faith and Love: Twin Forces in ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Notes on Contemporary Literature 18:1 (1988): 6-8. Print.

384McDowell, Frederick. “‘The individual in his pure singleness’: Theme and Symbol in The Captain’s Doll.” The Challenge of D. H. Lawrence. Eds. Keith Cushman and Michael Squires. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1990. 143-58. Print.

385---. “‘Pioneering into the Wilderness of Unopened life’: Lou Witt in America.” The Spirit of D. H. Lawrence: Centenary Studies. Eds. Gāmini Salgādo and G. K. Das. London: Macmillan, 1988. 92-105. Print.

386McGinnis, Wayne D. “Lawrence’s ‘Odour of Chysanthemums’ and Blake.” Research Studies (Washington State University) 44 (1976): 251-52. Print.

387McKenna, John. “Using the Lens of Keirsian Temperament Theory to Explain Character and Conflict in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 34-35 (2010): 25-40. Print.

388Mehl, Dieter. “‘Never was such a man for crossing frontiers’: A Gap in ‘The Border-Line’.” Études Lawrenciennes 32 (2005): 21-36. Print.

389Mellen, Joan. “Outfoxing Lawrence: Novella into Film.” Literature/Film Quarterly 1 (1973): 17-27. Print.

390Mellown, Elgin W. “The Captain’s Doll: Its Origins and Literary Allusions.” D. H. Lawrence Review 9 (1976): 226-35. Print.

391Merivale, Patricia. Pan the Goat-God: His Myth in Modern Times. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1969. Print. [Comments on Lawrence and the Pan Myth in “The Last Laugh,” “The Overtone,” and St. Mawr.]

392Meyers, Jeffrey. “D. H. Lawrence and Tradition: ‘The Horse Dealer’s Daughter’.” Studies In Short Fiction 26.3 (1989): 346-51. Print.

393---. “Katherine Mansfield, Gurdjieff, and Lawrence’s ‘Mother and Daughter’.” Twentieth Century Literature 22 (1976): 444-53. Print.

394---. “‘The Voice of Water’: Lawrence’s ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’.” English Miscellany 21 (1970): 199-207. Print.

395Michelucci, Stefania. Space and Place in the Works of D. H. Lawrence. Trans. Jill Franks. Jefferson: McFarland, 2002. Print. [Devotes a section to “The Prussian Officer,” and also to islands.]

396---. “The Violated Silence: D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’.” Beyond the Floating Islands: An Anthology. Eds. Stephanos Stephanides and Susan Bassnett. Bologna: U of Bologna, 2002. 128-34. Print.

397Millard, Elaine. “Feminism II: Reading as a Woman: D. H. Lawrence, St. Mawr.” Literary Theory at Work: Three Texts. Ed. Douglas Tallack. London: Batsford, 1987. 133-57. Print.

398Modiano, Marko. “‘Fanny and Annie’ and the War.” Durham University Journal 83 (1991): 69-74. Print.

399Monaco, Beatrice. “Lurid Colour in D.H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” Études Lawrenciennes 40 (2008): 183-200. Print.

400Moore, Harry T., ed. A D. H. Lawrence Miscellany. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1959. Print. [Sections are devoted to “The Blind Man,” “The Man Who Loved Islands” and The Princess.]

401Morsia, Elliott. “A Genetic Study of ‘The Shades of Spring’.” Journal of
D. H. Lawrence Studies
3. 3 (2014): 153-78. Print.

402Moss, Gemma. “A ‘Beginning rather than an end’: Popular Culture and Modernity in D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” Journal of D. H. Lawrence Studies 4.1 (2015): 119-39. Print.

403Moynahan, Julian. The Deed of Life: The Novels and Tales of D. H. Lawrence. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1963. Print.

404---. “Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Loved Islands: A Modern Fable.” Modern Fiction Studies 5 (Spring 1959): 57-64. Print.

405Naugrette, Jean-Pierre. “Le mythe et le réel: lecture de ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” Études Lawrenciennes 1 (1986): 7-27. Print.

406---.“Le renard et les rêves: onirisme, écriture et inconscient dans The Fox.” Études anglaises 37 (1984): 142-155. Print.

407Neill, Crispian. “D. H. lawrence and Dogs: Canines and the Critique of Civilisation.” Journal of D. H. Lawrence Studies 4.1 (2015): 95-118. Print. [A study of “Rex.”]

408Nelson, Jane. “The Familial Isotopy in The Fox.” The Challenge of D. H. Lawrence. Eds. Keith Cushman and Michael Squires. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1990. 129-42. Print.

409Nicolaj, Rina. “‘The Escaped Cock’: A Story of the Resurrection.” Études Lawrenciennes 14-15 (1996): 119-31. Print.

410Norris, Nanette. “1914: Two Sides to War: ‘England, My England’ and ‘Vin Ordinaire’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 39.1 (2014): 97-108. Print.

411O’Faolin, Sean, ed. Short Stories: A Study of Pleasure. Boston: Little & Brown, 1961. Print. [A section is devoted to “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter.”]

412Osborn, Marijane. “Complexities of Gender and Genre in Lawrence’s The Fox.” Essays in Literature 19 (1992): 84-97. Print.

413Padhi, Bibhu. “Lawrence’s Ironic Fables and How They Matter.” Interpretations 15.1 (1983): 53-59. Print. [Focuses on “The Man Who Loved Islands,” “The Princess” and “The Rocking-Horse Winner.”]

414---. “Lawrence, St. Mawr and Irony.” South Dakota Review 21.2 (1983): 5-13. Print.

415---. “‘The Woman Who Rode Away’ and Lawrence’s Vision of the New World.” University of Dayton Review 17 (Winter 1985-86):. 57-61. Print.

416Panajoti, Armela, and Marija Krivokapić, eds. Narrative Being vs. Narrating Being. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015. Print. [A section focuses mainly on “England, My England,” The Man Who Loved Islands” and “The Shades of Spring.”]

417Partlow, Robert B. Jr., and Harry T. Moore, eds. DHL The Man who Lived. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1980. Print. [A chapter is devoted to the collection England, My England and Other Stories.]

418Paxton, Nancy. “Reimagining melodrama: ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’ and the consequences of mourning.” D. H. Lawrence Review 38.3 (2013): 58-76. Print.

419Peek, Andrew. “Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘Ligeia,’ Hermione Roddice and ‘The Border-Line’: Common Romantic Contexts and a Source of Correspondence in the Fiction of Poe and Lawrence.” Journal of the
D. H. Lawrence Society
2.2 (1980): 4-8. Print.

420Penrith, Mary. “Some Structural Patterns in ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy.” University of Cape Town Studies in English 6 (1976): 46-52. Print.

421Phillips, Steven R. “The Double Pattern of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” Studies in Short Fiction 10 (1973): 94-97. Print.

422---. “The Monomyth and Literary Criticism.” College Literature 2 (1975): 1-16. Print. [Studies “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter.”]

423Piccolo, Anthony. “Sun and Sex in the Last Stories of D. H. Lawrence.” Helios: From Myth to Solar Energy. Ed. M. E. Grenander. Albany: State U of New York P, 1978. 1166-74. Print.

424Pilditch, Jan, ed. The Critical Response to D.H. Lawrence. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2001. Print. [A collection of previously published essays dealing with The Prussian Officer and Other Stories, The Fox together with “The Woman Who Rode Away” (see Draper), “The Princess” (see Cowan) “Odour of Chrysanthemums” (see Schulz) and St. Mawr (see Winn), see also Gurko.]

425Pinion, F. B. A D. H. Lawrence Companion: Life, Thought and Works. London: Macmillan, 1978. Print. [Gives an overview of the background and thematic content of the short stories.]

426Pinkney, Tony. D. H. Lawrence and Modernism. New York: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1990. Print. [A chapter is devoted to Englishness in works including “England, My England,” and refers to myth in “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

427Poplawski, Paul. Language, Art and Reality in D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr: A Stylistic Study. New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 1996. Print.

428---. “Lawrence’s satiric style: language and voice in St. Mawr.” Lawrence and Comedy. Eds. Paul Eggert and John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1996. Print.

429---. “St. Mawr and the Ironic Art of Realization.” Writing the Body in D. H. Lawrence: Essays on Language, Representation, and Sexuality. Ed. Paul Poplawski. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2001. 93-104. Print.

430---, ed. Writing the Body in D. H. Lawrence: Essays on Language, Representation, and Sexuality. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2001. Print. [Contains a section on St. Mawr and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

431Prasuna, M. G. “Writing ‘like’ a Woman: An Analysis of The Fox by D. H. Lawrence.” International Journal of English and Literature 4.4 (2013): 181-83. Print.

432Preston, Peter. “Narrative Procedure and Structure in a Short Story by D. H. Lawrence.” Journal of English Language and Literature (Korea) 29 (1983): 251-56. Print. [An analysis of “Things.”]

433---, and Peter Hoare, eds. D. H. Lawrence and the Modern World. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1989. Print. [A section is devoted to The Fox.]

434Pritchard, R. E. D. H. Lawrence: Body of Darkness. London: Hutchinson University Library, 1971. Print. [Refers to “England, My England,” The Fox “The Man Who Died,” “The Prussian Officer” stories, “The Virgin and the Gipsy,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

435Pugh, Bridget. “Lawrence and Industrial Symbolism.” Renaissance and Modern Studies 29 (1985): 33-49. Print. [A study of symbols in the “England, My England,” “The Virgin and the Gipsy” and “The Woman Who Rode Away” stories.]

436Radu, Adrian. “Masculinity, domination and the Other in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Prussian Officer’.” British and American Studies 21 (2015): 93-99. Print.

437Ragachewkaya, Marina. “The Logic of Love: Deconstructing Eros in Four of D. H. Lawrence’s Short Stories.” Études Lawrenciennes 43 (2012): 105-28. Print. [Studies “The Blind Man,” “Love Among the Haystacks,” “Second Best,” and “The White Stocking.”]

438Ragussis, Michael. “The False Myth of St. Mawr: Lawrence and the Subterfuge of Art.” Papers on Language and Literature 11 (1975): 186-97. Print.

439Raina, M. L. “A Forster Parallel in Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” Notes and Queries 211 (1966): 96-97. Print.

440Ramadier, Bernard-Jean. “Dubious progress in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘Tickets, Please’.” Journal of the Short Story in English/Les Cahiers de la nouvelle 35 (2000): 43-54. Print.

441Reeve, N. H. Reading Late Lawrence. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Print. [Includes discussions of “Glad Ghosts,” “Sun,” “The Lovely Lady” and “The Blue Moccasins.”]

442---. “Two Lovely Ladies.” English 49.193 (2000): 15-22. Print. [A reading of variant texts of the short story “A Lovely Lady.”]

443Reinhold, Nathalya. “‘Going for Lawrence for feeling’: A Study of The Princess.” Études Lawrenciennes 43 (2012): 203-14. Print.

444Relf, Jan. Wormholes: Essays and Occasional Writings. London: Jonathan Cape, 1998. Print. [Includes a section on “The Man Who Died.”]

445Renner, Stanley. “The Lawrentian Power and Logic of Equus.” D. H. Lawrence’s Literary Inheritors. Eds. Dennis Jackson and Keith Cushman. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991. 31-45. Print. [Traces parallels between St. Mawr and the play.]

446---. “Sexuality and the Unconscious: Psychosexual Drama and Conflict in The Fox.” D. H. Lawrence Review 21.3 (1989): 245-73. Print.

447Rivers, Bryan. “Flattened Primroses: Discarded Floral Symbolism in an Early Manuscript Version of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” Notes and Queries 58.1 (2011): 120-22. Print.

448---. “‘No Meaning for Anybody’: D. H. Lawrence’s Use of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Fir Tree in the Original Version of ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’ (1910).” Notes and Queries 61.1 (2014): 114-16. Print.

449---. “Winter-Crack Trees: Botanical Symbolism and D. H. Lawrence’s 1914 Revisions of ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” Notes and Queries 59.3 (2012): 411-13. Print.

450Rohman, Carrie. “Ecology and the Creaturely in D. H. Lawrence’s Sun.” Journal of D. H. Lawrence Studies 2.2 (2010): 115-32. Print.

451Rose, Shirley. “Physical Trauma in D. H. Lawrence’s Short Fiction.” Contemporary Literature 16 (1975): 73-83. Print. [Parallels are drawn between most of Lawrence’s short stories]

452Rosenbaum, S. P., ed. English Literature and British Philosophy: A Collection of Essays. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1971. Print. [A section is devoted to “The Blind Man”]

453Ross, Charles. “D. H. Lawrence and World War I or History and the ‘Form of Reality’: The Case of ‘England, My England’.” Franklin Pierce Studies in Literature. Eds. James F. Maybury and Marjorie A. Zerbel. Rindge: Franklin Pierce College, 1982. 11-21. Print.

454Ross, Michael. “Ladies and Foxes: D. H. Lawrence, David Garnett, and the Female of the Species.” D. H. Lawrence Review 18 (1985-6): 229-38. Print.

455---. “Lawrence’s Second Sun.” D. H. Lawrence Review 8 (1975): 1-18. Print.

456---. “The Mythology of Friendship: D. H. Lawrence, Bertrand Russell, and ‘The Blind Man’.” English Literature and British Philosophy: A Collection of Essays. Ed. S. P. Rosenbaum. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1971. 285-315. Print.

457---. “Running The Fox to Earth: Strategies for Raising Questions Beyond Gender.” D. H. Lawrence Review 29.3 (2000): 59-60. Print.

458Rossi, Patrizio. “Lawrence’s two ‘Foxes’: A Comparison of the Texts.” Essays in Criticism 22 (1972): 265-78. Print.

459Rossman, Charles. “Myth and Misunderstanding D. H. Lawrence.” Bucknell Review 22.2 (1976): 81-101. Print. [Studies “England, My England,” “The Princess,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

460Roussenova, Stefana. “Crossing Borders in St. Mawr.” Études Lawrenciennes 32 (2005): 109-22. Print.

461Roux, Magali. “Emotions and Otherness in D. H. Lawrence’s Mexican Fiction.” Études Lawrenciennes 43 (2012): 215-35. Print.

462Ruderman, Judith. D. H. Lawrence and the Devouring Mother: The Search for a Patriarchal Ideal of Leadership. Durham: Duke UP, 1984. Print. [In addition to the “leadership novels,” also includes passages devoted to “England, My England,” The Fox and “Hadrian,” St. Mawr, “The Virgin and the Gipsy” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

463---. “The Fox and the ‘Devouring Mother’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 10 (1977): 251-69. Print.

464---. “Lawrence’s The Fox and Verga’s The She-Wolf.” Modern Language Notes 94 (1979): 153-67. Print.

465---. “The New Adam and Eve in Lawrence’s The Fox and Other Works.” Southern Humanities Review 17 (1983): 225-36. Print.

466---. “Prototypes for Lawrence’s The Fox.” Journal of Modern Literature 8.1 (1980): 77-98. Print.

467---. “Tracking Lawrence’s ‘Fox’: An Account of its Composition, Evolution and Publication.” Studies in Bibliography 33 (1980): 206-21. Print.

468Ryals, Clyde de Loache. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’: An Interpretation.” Literature and Psychology 12 (1962): 39-43. Print.

469Ryan, Kiernan. “The Revenge of the Women: Lawrence’s ‘Tickets, Please’.” Literature and History 7 (1981): 210-22. Print.

470Sagar, Keith. The Art of D. H. Lawrence. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1966. Print. [Sections deal with “The Flying-Fish,” The Fox, “The Man Who Died,” “Odour of Chrysanthemums,” St. Mawr, Sun and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

471---. “‘The Best I Have Known’: D. H. Lawrence’s ‘A Modern Lover’ and ‘The Shades of Spring.” Studies in Short Fiction 4 (Winter 1967): 143-51. Print.

472---. Life into Art. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1985. Print. [A biographical approach to Lawrence’s works.]

473Salgādo, Gāmini, and G. K. Das. The Spirit of D. H. Lawrence: Centenary Studies. London: Macmillan, 1988. Print. [A chapter looks at the publication and revisions of The Fox while another examines the St. Mawr character Lou Witt.]

474San Juan, E. Jr. “Textual Production in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” DLSU Graduate Journal 12 (1987): 223-30. Print.

475---. “Theme versus Imitation: D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 2 (1970): 136-40. Print.

476Sargent, M. Elizabeth. “Thinking and Writing from the body: Eugene Gendlin, D. H. Lawrence, and ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” Writing the Body in D. H. Lawrence: Essays on Language, Representation, and Sexuality. Ed. Paul Poplawski. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2001. 105-18. Print.

477---. “The Wives, the Virgins and Isis: Lawrence’s Exploitation of Female Will in Four Late Novellas of Spiritual Quest.” D. H. Lawrence Review 26.1-3 (1995-96): 227-48. Print.

478Scheff, Doris. “Interpreting ‘Eyes’ in D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr.” American Notes and Queries 19 (1980): 48-51. Print.

479Scherr, Arthur. “Trust and Betrayal in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Died’.” Explicator 67.4 (2009): 291-94. Print.

480Scherr, Barry. “‘The Prussian Officer’: A Lawrentian Allegory.” Recovering Literature 17 (1989-90): 33-42. Print.

481Scholtes, M. “St. Mawr: Between Degeneration and Regeneration.” Dutch Quarterly Review 5 (1975): 253-69. Print.

482Schorer, Mark, ed. The Story: A Critical Anthology. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1950. Print. [A section is devoted to “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter.”]

483Schulz, Victor. “D. H. Lawrence’s Early Masterpiece of Short Fiction: ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” Studies in Short Fiction 28.3 (1991): 363-71. Print.

484Scott, James B. “The Norton Distortion: A Dangerous Typo in ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 21.2 (1989): 175-77. Print.

485Scott, James F. “Thimble into Ladybird: Nietzsche, Frobenius, and Bachofen in the Later Work of D.H. Lawrence.” Arcadia 13 (1978): 161-76. Print.

486Secor, Robert. “Language and Movement in ‘Fanny and Annie’.” Studies in Short Fiction 6 (Summer 1969): 395-400. Print.

487Seidl, Frances. “Lawrence’s ‘The Shadow in the Rose Garden’.” Explicator 32 (1973): item 9. Print.

488Shaw, Valery. The Short Story. A Critical Introduction. Harlow: Longman, 1992. Print. [Broaches Lawrence’s story-telling techniques referring to “Daughters of the Vicar,” “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter” and “Tickets, Please.”]

489Shields, E. F. “Broken Vision in Lawrence’s The Fox.” Studies in Short Fiction 9 (1972): 353-63. Print.

490Siegel, Carol. “Floods of Female Desire in Lawrence and Eudora Welty.”
D. H. Lawrence’s Literary Inheritors. Eds. Dennis Jackson and Keith Cushman. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991. 166-84. Print. [Deals with “The Virgin and the Gipsy.”]

491---. “St. Mawr: Lawrence’s Journey Toward Cultural Feminism.” D. H. Lawrence Review 26.1-3 (1995-6): 275-86. Print.

492Simpson, Hilary. D. H. Lawrence and Feminism. London: Croom Helm, 1982. Print.

493Sinzelle, Claude. “Skinning the Fox: A Masochist’s Delight.” D. H. Lawrence and the Modern World. Eds. Peter Preston and Peter Hoare. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1989. 161-79. Print.

494Sklenicka, Carol. D. H. Lawrence and the Child. Columbia: U of Missouri P, 1991. Print. [Discusses “England, My England,” “The Escaped Cock,” “The Fly in the Ointment,” “A Lesson on a Tortoise” “The Old Adam,” and “The Rocking-Horse Winner.”]

495Slade, Tony. D. H. Lawrence. London: Evans, 1969. Print. [Discusses “Daughters of the Vicar,” The Fox, “The Man Who Died,” “Odour of Chrysanthemums,” “Tickets, Please,” “The Virgin and the Gipsy,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

496Smith, Anne, ed. Lawrence and Women. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1978. Print. [Discusses St. Mawr.]

497Smith, Bob L. “D. H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr: Transposition of Myth.” Arizona Quarterly 24 (Autumn 1968): 197-208. Print.

498Smith, Duane. “England, My England as Fragmentary Novel.” D. H. Lawrence Review 24 (Autumn 1992): 247-55. Print.

499Smith, Julian. “Vision and Revision: ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’ as Film.” Literature/Film Quarterly 1 (1973): 28-36. Print.

500Snodgrass, W. D. “A Rocking-Horse: The Symbol, the Pattern, the Way to Live.” D. H. Lawrence: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Mark Spilka. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1963. 117-26. Print.

501Sobchack, Thomas. “The Fox: The Film and the novel.” Western Humanities Review 23 (Winter 1969): 73-78. Print.

502Spender, Stephen, ed. D. H. Lawrence, Novelist, Poet, Prophet. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1973. Print. [A section refers to St. Mawr, “The Princess,” and to “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

503Spilka, Mark, ed. D. H. Lawrence: A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1963. Print. [Sections are devoted to “The Blind Man,” The Fox, The Captain’s Doll, The Ladybird and St. Mawr, and to “The Man Who Died.”]

504---. “Lawrence’s Quarrel with Tenderness.” Critical Quarterly 9 (Winter 1967): 363-77. Print. [Mentions the story “In Love.”]

505---. “Ritual Form in ‘The Blind Man’.” D. H. Lawrence: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Mark Spilka. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1963. 112-16. Print.

506Squires, Michael, and Dennis Jackson, eds. D. H. Lawrence’s Lady: A New Look at Lady Chatterley’s Lover. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1985. Print. [A chapter is devoted to “The Virgin and the Gipsy.”]

507Štefl, Martin. “The ‘Idea’ of the Self: Narrated Identities in D. H. Lawrence’s (Short) Fiction.” Narrative Being vs. Narrating Being. Eds. Armela Panajoti and Marija Krivokapić. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015. 54-72. Print. [Focuses mainly on “England, My England,” The Man Who Loved Islands” and “The Shades of Spring.”]

508Stephanides, Stephanos, and Susan Bassnett, eds. Beyond the Floating Islands: An Anthology. Bologna: U of Bologna, 2002. Print. [Devotes a chapter to “The Man Who Loved Islands.”]

509Steven, Laurence. “From Thimble to Ladybird: D.H. Lawrence’s Widening Vision.” The D H Lawrence Review18.3 (1986): 239-53. Print.

510---. “‘The Woman Who Rode Away’: D. H. Lawrence’s Cul-de-sac.” English Studies in Canada 10 (1984): 209-20. Print.

511Stevens, Hugh. “Sex and the Nation: ‘The Prussian Officer’ and Women in Love.The Cambridge Companion to D. H. Lawrence. Ed. Anne Fernihough. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001. 49-65. Print.

512Stewart, Jack. “Expressionism in ‘The Prussian Officer’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 18.2-3 (1985-6): 275-89. Print.

513---. “Eros and Thanatos in Lawrence’s ‘The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter’.” Studies in the Humanities 12 (1985): 11-19. Print.

514---. “Flowers and Flesh: Color, Place and Animism in St. Mawr and ‘Flowery Tuscany’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 36.1 (2011): 92-113. Print.

515---. “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter.” D.H. Lawrence: Critical Assessments. Vol. 3. Eds. David Ellis and Ornella de Zordo. Mountfield: Helm Information, 1992. 515-525. Print.

516---.Lawrence’s Ontological Vision in Etruscan Places, ‘The Escaped Cock’ and Apocalypse.” D. H. Lawrence Review 31.2 (2003): 43-58. Print.

517---. “Totem and Symbol in The Fox and St. Mawr.” Studies in the Humanities 16 (1989): 84-98. Print.

518Stewart, John I. M. Eight Modern Writers. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1963. Print. [Discusses The Captain’s Doll, “Daughters of the Vicar,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

519Stiffler, Dan. “Seeds of Exchange: St. Mawr as D. H. Lawrence’s American Garden.” D. H. Lawrence Review 25.1-3 (1993-4): 81-90. Print.

520Stoltzfus, Ben. Lacan and Litterature: Purloined Texts. Albany: State U of New York P, 1996. Print. [Sections are devoted to “The Escaped Cock” and to “The Rocking-Horse Winner.”]

521---. “Lacan’s Knot, Freud’s Narrative, and the Tangle of ‘Glad Ghosts’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 32-33 (2003-4): 106-18. Print.

522---. “‘The Man Who Loved Islands’: A Lacanian Reading.” D. H. Lawrence Review 29.3 (2000): 27-38. Print.

523Stovel, Nora F. “D. H. Lawrence and ‘The Dignity of Death’: Tragic Recognition in ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums,’ ‘The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd,’ and Sons and Lovers.” D. H. Lawrence Review 16 (1983): 59-82. Print.

524Strychacz, Thomas. “‘What I don’t seem to see at all is you’: D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox and the Politics of Masquerade.” Modernism and masculinity. Eds. Natalya Lusty and Julian Murphet. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2014. 179-95. Print.

525Sutherland, Romy. “From D. H. Lawrence to the Language of Cinema: Chaste Sacrifices in ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’ and ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’.” Études Lawrenciennes 44 (2013): 241-51. Print.

526Tallack, Douglas, ed. Literary Theory at Work: Three Texts. London: Batsford, 1987. Print. [Several sections deal with St. Mawr.]

527Tallman, Warren. “Forest, Glacier and Flood. The Moon. St. Mawr: A Canvas for Lawrence’s Novellas.” Open Letter 3rd series, no.6 (1976): 75-92. Print.

528Tanner, Tony. “D. H. Lawrence in America.” D. H. Lawrence, Novelist, Poet, Prophet. Ed. Stephen Spender. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1973. 170-96. Print. [Refers to St. Mawr, “The Princess” and to “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

529Tarinayya, M. “Lawrence’s ‘England, My England’: An Analysis.” Journal of the School of Languages 7 (Winter 1980-1): 70-83. Print.

530Tartera, Nicole. “Criss-cross Borderlines in the Wilderness: St. Mawr, The Princess, ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” Études Lawrenciennes 32 (2005): 123-34. Print.

531---. “St Mawr, de l’humour à la satire; ou les facettes de l’esprit lawrencien.” Études Lawrenciennes 6 (1991): 53-68. Print.

532Tedlock, E. W., Jr. D. H. Lawrence: Artist and Rebel, a Study of Lawrence’s Fiction. Albuquerque: U of New Mexico P, 1963. Print. [Discusses “The Blind Man,” “The Border- Line,” The Captain’s Doll, “The Christening,” “Daughters of the Vicar,” “Goose Fair,” “Hadrian,” “Her Turn,” “In Love,” “Jimmy and the Desperate Woman,” “Love Among the Haystacks,” “The Lovely Lady,” “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” and “The Virgin and the Gipsy.”]

533Temple, J. “The Definition of Innocence: A Consideration of the Short Stories of D. H. Lawrence.” Studia Germanica Gandensia 20 (1979): 105-18. Print.

534Templeton, Wayne. “Resisting Evaluation: Canonization and ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Journal of the Short Story/Les Cahiers de la nouvelle 21 (1993): 79-94. Print.

535Thompson, Leslie M. “The Christ Who Didn’t Die: Analogues to D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Died’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 8 (1975): 19-30. Print.

536Thornton, Weldon. D. H. Lawrence: A Study of the Short Fiction. New York: Maxwell Macmillan International, 1993. Print.

537---. “‘The Flower or the Fruit’: A Reading of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘England, My England’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 16 (1983): 247-58. Print.

538---. “A Trio from Lawrence’s England, My England and Other Stories: Readings of ‘Monkey Nuts,’ ‘The Primrose Path” and “Fanny and Annie’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 28.3 (1999): 5-29. Print.

539Toyokuni, Takashi. “A Modern Man Obsessed by Time: A Note on ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 7 (Spring 1974): 78-82. Print.

540Travis, Leigh. “D. H. Lawrence: The Blood-Conscious Artist.” American Imago 25 (1968): 163-90. Print. [Discusses “Daughters of the Vicar,” “The Princess,” and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

541Trebisz, Małgorzata. The Novella in England at the Turn of the XIX and XX centuries: H. James, J. Conrad, D.H. Lawrence. Wrocław: Wydawn Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego, 1992. Print.

542Turner, Barnard. “Chasing Strange Gods in ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” Études Lawrenciennes 22 (2000): 107-30. Print.

543Turner, John. “The Capacity to Be Alone and Its Failure in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 16.3 (1983): 259-89. Print.

544---. “The Perversion of Play in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 15.3 (1982): 249-70. Print.

545---. “Purity and Danger in D.H. Lawrence’s ‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’.” D. H. Lawrence: Centenary Essays. Ed. Mara Kalnins. Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1986. 139-71. Print.

546Urbano, Cosimo. “The Evil that Men Do: Mark Rydell’s Adaptation of D. H. Lawrence’s The Fox.” Literature/Film Quarterly 23.4 (1995): 254-61. Print.

547Vichy, Thérèse. “L’ironie dans ‘The Woman Who Rode Away’.” Études Lawrenciennes 6 (1991): 69-81. Print.

548Vickery, John B. “Myth and Ritual in the Shorter Fiction of D. H. Lawrence.” Modern Fiction Studies 5 (Spring 1959): 65–82. Print. [Refers to St. Mawr.]

549Viinikka, Anja. From Persephone to Pan: D. H. Lawrence’s Mythopoeic Vision of the Intergrated Personality. Turku: Turun Yliopisto Julkaisuje, 1988. Print. [Deals with “The Overtone” and St. Mawr.]

550---. “‘The Man Who Died’: D. H. Lawrence’s Phallic Vision of the Restored Body.” Journal of the D. H. Lawrence Society (1994-5): 39-46. Print.

551Villanueva-Casado, Maria. “Modernism and the Disenchantment of Modernity in Katherine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence.” Anti-tales: The Uses of Disenchantment. Eds. Catriona McAra and David Calvin. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011. 285-94. Print. [Focuses on dystopian elements in “The Rocking-Horse Winner” and “A Suburban Fairy Tale.”]

552Vivas, Eliseo. D. H. Lawrence: The Failure and the Triumph of Art. London: Allen & Unwin, 1960. Print. [Discusses, “Daughters of the Vicar.”]

553Vowles, Richard B. “Lawrence’s ‘The Blind Man’.” Explicator 11 (1952): item 14. Print.

554Wadsworth, P. Beaumont, ed. ‘A Prelude’ by D. H. Lawrence: His First and Previously Unrecorded Work, with an Explanatory Foreword Dealing with its Discovery. Thames Ditton: Merle Press, 1949. Print.

555Wallace, Jeff. D. H. Lawrence, Science and the Posthuman. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. Print. [Sections are devoted to The Fox and St. Mawr.]

556Ward, Jason M. The Forgotten Film Adaptations of D. H. Lawrence’s Short Stories. A Brill e-book, 2016. Print. DOI: 10.1163/9789004309050 [Studies the fluidity of the texts in relation to film adaptations focusing more particularly on “Odour of Chrysanthemums,” “The Horse-Dealer’s Daughter” and “The Rocking-Horse Winner.”]

557Wasserman, Jerry. “St. Mawr and the Search for Community.” Mosaic 5.2 (1972): 113-23. Print.

558Watkins, Daniel P. “Labor and Religion in D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’.” Studies in Short Fiction 24.3 (1987): 295-301. Print.

559Watson, Garry. “‘The fact, and the crucial significance, of desire’: Lawrence’s ‘Virgin and the Gipsy’.” English 34 (1985): 131-56. Print.

560Weiner, S. Ronald. “Irony and Symbolism in ‘The Princess’.” A D. H. Lawrence Miscellany. Ed. Harry T. Moore. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1959. 221-38. Print.

561Weiss, Daniel A. Oedipus in Nottingham: D. H. Lawrence. Seattle: U of Washington P, 1962. Print. [Broaches the Oedipus motif in “The Prussian Officer” stories and “The Man Who Died.”]

562West, Anthony. D. H. Lawrence. Denver: Swallow, 1950. Print. [Discusses “The Border-Line”]

563West, Ray. Reading the Short Story. New York: Crowell, 1968. Print. [Discusses ‘The Blind Man.”]

564Wheeler, Richard P. “‘Cunning in his overthrow’: Give and Take in ‘Tickets, Please’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 10 (1977): 242-50. Print.

565---. “Intimacy and Irony in ‘The Blind Man’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 9 (Summer 1976): 236-53. Print.

566Whelan, P. T. “The Hunting Metaphor in The Fox and Other Works.” D. H. Lawrence Review 21.3 (1989): 275-90. Print.

567Wicker, Brian. The Story-Shaped World: Fiction and Metaphysics, Some Variations on a Theme. 1975. London: Bloomsbury, 2013. Print. [Refers to “The Man Who Died,” St. Mawr and “The Woman Who Rode Away.”]

568Widmer, Kingsley. The Art of Perversity, D.H. Lawrence’s shorter fictions. Seattle: U of Washington P, 1962. Print.

569---. “Birds of Passion and Birds of Marriage in D. H. Lawrence.” University of Kansas City Review 25 (Autumn 1958): 73-79. Print. [Discusses “The Blue Moccasins,” “Two Blue Birds,” and Wintry Peacock.”]

570---. “D. H. Lawrence and the Art of Nihilism.” Kenyon Review 20 (1958): 604-16. Print. [Deals with “The Prussian Officer” stories and “The Man Who Loved Islands.”]

571---. “Lawrence and the Fall of Modern Woman.” Modern Fiction Studies 5 (Spring 1959): 47-56. Print. [Discusses “None of That” and “The Princess.”]

572Wiehe, R. E. “Lawrence’s ‘Tickets, Please’.” Explicator 20 (1961): item 12. Print.

573Wilde, Alan. “The Illusion of St. Mawr: Technique and Vision in D. H. Lawrence’s Novel.” PMLA 79 (1964): 164-70. Print.

574Willbern, David. “Malice in Paradise: Isolation and Projection in ‘The Man Who Loved Islands’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 10 (1977): 223-41. Print.

575Williams, Linda R. Sex in the Head: Visions of Femininity and Film in
D. H. Lawrence
. New York: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1993. Print. [A critical approach through the eyes and the gaze, passages are devoted to “The Blind Man.”]

576---. “‘We’ve been forgetting that we’re flesh and blood, Mother’: ‘Glad Ghosts’ and Uncanny Bodies.” D. H. Lawrence Review 27.2-3 (1997-8): 233-54. Print.

577Wilson, K. “D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’: Parable and Structure. English Studies in Canada 13.4 (1987): 438-50. Print.

578Winn, Harbour. “Parallel Inward Journeys: A Passage to India and St. Mawr.” English Language Notes 31 (1993): 62-66. Print.

579Wolkenfeld, Suzanne. “‘The Sleeping Beauty’ Retold: D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Fox’.”Studies in Short Fiction 14.4 (1977): 345-52. Print.

580Woo, Jung Min. “Sun: The Bible ‘written in a kind of foreign language’.” Études Lawrenciennes 34 (2007): 111-24. Print.

581Wood, Paul. “The Cost of Liberation: Sexual Politics in Lawrence’s ‘Tickets, Please’.” Journal of the D. H. Lawrence Society (1992-93): 105-08. Print.

582---. “The True Cause of Dollie Urquart’s Fall: Complementary Interpretations of Lawrence’s ‘The Princess’.” Journal of the D. H. Lawrence Society (1996): 18-26. Print.

583Woods, Gregory. A History of Gay Literature: The Male Tradition. New Haven: Yale UP, 1998. Print. [Broaches the question of homosexuality in “The Prussian Officer.”]

584Worthen, John. “Short Story and Autobiography: Kinds of Detachment in D. H. Lawrence’s Early Fiction.” Renaissance and Modern Studies 29 (1985): 1-15. Print. [A discussion of “The Prussian Officer” stories.]

585Wright, Terry. D. H. Lawrence and the Bible. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2000. Print. [Discusses “The Escaped Cock.”]

586Wulff, Ute-Christel. “Hebl, Hofmannsthal and Lawrence’s ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” D. H. Lawrence Review 20.3 (1988): 287-96. Print.

587Yamin, Cai. “Industrial Corruption: The Main Culprit for the Relationship between Husband and Wife in ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’.” Canadian Social Science 3.4 (2007): 14-18. Print.

588Yanada, Noriyuki. “‘The Virgin and the Gipsy’: Four Realms and Narrative Modes.” Language and Culture 20 (1991): 121-46. Print.

589Young, Jane Jaffe. D. H. Lawrence on Screen: Re-Visioning Prose Style in the Films of “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” Sons and Lovers, and Women in Love. New York: Peter Lang, 1999. Print.

590Zaratsian, Christine. Le Phénix, Mode Essentiel de l’Imaginaire chez D. H. Lawrence. Villeneuve d’Ascq: Presses Universitaires du Septentrion, 1997. 2 vols. Print. [Traces alchemy symbolism in Lawrence’s works.]

591Zytaruk, George J. “‘The Undying Man’: D. H. Lawrence’s Yiddish Story.” D. H. Lawrence Review 4 (1971): 20-27. Print.

IV. Bibliographies

592Cowan, James. D. H. Lawrence: An Annotated Bibliography of Writings about him. DeKalb: Northern Illinois UP, 1982. Print.

593Iida, Takeo, ed. The Reception of D. H. Lawrence Around the World. Fukuoka: Kyushu UP, 1999. Print.

594Mehl, Dieter, and Christa Jansohn, eds. The Reception of D. H. Lawrence in Europe. London: Continuum, 2007. Print.

595Mikriammos, Philippe, ed. D. H. Lawrence: Le Serpent à plumes et autres oeuvres mexicaines. Paris: Robert Laffont, 2011. Print. [Lists all the translations of Lawrence’s works into French including translations of the short stories.]

596Poplawski, Paul, ed. D.H. Lawrence: A Reference Companion. Westport: Greenwood, 1996. Print.

597Preston, Peter. A D. H. Lawrence Chronology. New York: St Martin’s Press, 1994. Print.

598Roberts, Warren, and Paul Poplawski. A Bibliography of D. H. Lawrence. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001. Print. [Lists the first editions of Lawrence’s works, the main reviews that appeared at the time and the subsequent seminal studies.]

599Sagar, Keith, ed. A D. H. Lawrence Handbook. Manchester: Manchester UP, 1982. Print. [Includes a select bibliography of studies of Lawrence’s works, a checklist of his readings, a glossary of Nottingham dialect and an identification of places in Lawrence’s fiction.]

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Shirley Bricout, « D.H. Lawrence: A Bibliography », Journal of the Short Story in English, 68 | 2017, 161-211.

Référence électronique

Shirley Bricout, « D.H. Lawrence: A Bibliography », Journal of the Short Story in English [En ligne], 68 | Spring 2017, mis en ligne le 01 juin 2019, consulté le 21 août 2019. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/jsse/1828

Auteur

Shirley Bricout

Shirley Bricout is a member of the post-doctoral research group based at the University Paul Valéry Montpellier 3 (France) devoted to British Literature and Art. The translation into English of her first book was released in 2015 under the title Politics and the Bible in D. H. Lawrence's Leadership Novels at the Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée. It is honored with a foreword by Keith Cushman. She has contributed articles and book reviews to Les Etudes Lawrenciennes (Paris X), Les Etudes britanniques contemporaines (Montpellier 3) and to The Journal of D. H. Lawrence Studies (Nottingham, UK).

Articles du même auteur

Droits d’auteur

© All rights reserved

  • OpenEdition Journals