Skip to navigation – Site map
Article
Varia

The Dunning-Kruger Effect in Dirty Realism: Dorothy Allison’s “Jason Who Will Be Famous,” Larry Brown’s “Waiting for the Ladies,” and Chuck Palahniuk’s “Romance”

David S. McCracken
p. 251-270

Abstract

Un bon nombre d’écrivains américains – tels que Dorothy Allison, Larry Brown et Chuck Palahniuk – dont les œuvres appartiennent au genre « dirty realism » emploient, probablement à leur insu, ce qu’il convient d’appeler l’effet Dunning-Kruger pour faciliter la production de l’ironie comique dans leur écriture. Cette théorie de David Dunning and Justin Kruger sert à expliquer la raison pour laquelle les gens surestiment ou sous-estiment leur compétence à prendre la décision juste dans diverses situations. Quant au « dirty realism », l’écrivain crée des personnages dont la surestimation de leur compétence face à un défi aboutit à des résultats inespérés. Ces écrivains emploient souvent l’ironie comique pour faire avancer l’intrigue de leurs histoires : ce qui sert à renforcer la liaison entre le lecteur et les personnages pour lesquels le lecteur ressent en même temps de l’empathie et de la supériorité. La composante transgressive de ces histoires fait que le lecteur ressent à la fois de la répulsion et de l’attraction envers ces personnages. Cet article illustre comment l’effet Dunning-Kruger se manifeste dans trois nouvelles : « Jason Who Will Be Famous » de Dorothy Allison, « Waiting for the Ladies » de Larry Brown, et « Romance » de Chuck Palahniuk.

Index terms

Excerpt

Full text document will be published online on December 2020.

First lines

In Hicks, Tribes, and Dirty Realists, arguing American fiction has returned to a focus on realistic depictions of human experience, Robert Rebein writes,

Dirty Realism, as I would like to employ the term, refers to an effect in both subject matter and technique that is somewhere between the hard-boiled and the darkly comic. It refers to the impulse in writers to explore dark truths, to descend, as it were, into the darkest holes of society and what used to be called “the soul of man.” Not the trailer parks and fern bars of minimalism, . . . but rather the more intense worlds of war, drug addiction, serious crime, prostitution, prison. (43)

This definition differs in degree from what has been considered the industry standard, editor Bill Buford’s declaration in the summer 1983 publication of Granta concerning a new form of American writing: “a curious, dirty realism about the belly-side of contemporary life, . . . so stylized and particularized—so insistently informed by a discomforti...

References

Bibliographical reference

David S. McCracken, « The Dunning-Kruger Effect in Dirty Realism: Dorothy Allison’s “Jason Who Will Be Famous,” Larry Brown’s “Waiting for the Ladies,” and Chuck Palahniuk’s “Romance” », Journal of the Short Story in English, 71 | 2018, 251-270.

Electronic reference

David S. McCracken, « The Dunning-Kruger Effect in Dirty Realism: Dorothy Allison’s “Jason Who Will Be Famous,” Larry Brown’s “Waiting for the Ladies,” and Chuck Palahniuk’s “Romance” », Journal of the Short Story in English [Online], 71 | Autumn 2018, Online since 01 December 2020, connection on 15 August 2020. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/jsse/2288

About the author

David S. McCracken

Dr. David McCracken is a professor of English and the chair of Communication, Language, and Literature at Coker College in Hartsville, South Carolina. His areas of interest are American literature, contemporary fiction, and rhetoric and composition. Dr. McCracken has published articles about F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Carver, Chuck Palahniuk, and other American authors.

Copyright

© All rights reserved

  • OpenEdition Journals