Navigation – Plan du site
Note de lecture
Book Review

Book Review: Jennifer J. Smith, The American Short Story Cycle (Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh UP, 2018, 194 p.)

Luciana Cardi
p. 351-353

Extrait du texte

Ce document sera publié en ligne en texte intégral en décembre 2020.

Aperçu du texte

In this insightful study, Jennifer Smith moves from a lucid reflection on the controversial debate over the origins, characteristics and literary labels attributed to the short story cycle as a genre to explore how American cycles have contributed to articulating the problematic notion of modern subjectivity from the nineteenth century to contemporary times, in periods of cultural and ideological change. She examines texts by authors from different historical and ethnic backgrounds to illustrate how this genre, with its characteristic literary form and its recurring narrative motifs, challenges the notion of identity as a fixed, unitary entity shaped by linear narrative practices and framed in well-defined structures of time and space. Her extensive analysis aims to broaden the scope of the genre by including volumes usually considered under different literary labels. It also stresses the connections between a heterogeneous corpus of texts, ranging from Homer’s Odyssey and Boccaccio...

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Luciana Cardi, « Book Review: Jennifer J. Smith, The American Short Story Cycle (Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh UP, 2018, 194 p.) », Journal of the Short Story in English, 71 | 2018, 351-353.

Référence électronique

Luciana Cardi, « Book Review: Jennifer J. Smith, The American Short Story Cycle (Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh UP, 2018, 194 p.) », Journal of the Short Story in English [En ligne], 71 | Autumn 2018, mis en ligne le 01 décembre 2020, consulté le 14 août 2020. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/jsse/2390

Auteur

Luciana Cardi

Dr Luciana Cardi is a lecturer in Comparative Japanese Studies, and Italian language and culture at Osaka University. She holds a PhD in comparative literature and her research interests include gender studies, fairy-tale studies, contemporary Japanese narrative and Anglo-American literature. She is currently researching adaptations of Japanese folktales in Anglo-American fiction and her project is supported by the “Kakenhi” Fund for Scientific Research, from the Japanese Ministry of Education. She is the co-editor of the forthcoming volume Re-Orienting the Fairy Tale (Wayne State UP) and her publications include “A Fool Will Never Be Happy: Kurahashi Yumiko’s Retelling of Snow White” (Marvels & Tales Journal of Fairy-Tale Studies, 2013) and “Shifting Performances of Womanhood in Kij Johnson’s Retelling of Konjaku monogatari” (The Transformed Body in Contemporary Japanese Society and Fiction, Routledge, forthcoming).

Droits d’auteur

© All rights reserved

  • OpenEdition Journals