Navigation – Plan du site

The Recipients of Complimentary Copies Could Drive Him Mad

Jonathan Long

Entrées d’index

Haut de page

Texte intégral

Will you please let somebody send me three copies of the Peacock, with the bill therefor? Three rapacious relatives are turtling with indignation at my neglect: if they were not ten times better able to spare the cash than I, I might tell them to buy their own books and go to the devil; (Li 221)

  • 1 I do not consider the wider question of why particular books were dedicated to individuals (such as (...)

1Thus Lawrence reacted angrily to some requests for complimentary copies of his first novel. But on the whole Lawrence was a willing and generous provider of his books to family and friends, and the subject features regularly in his letters. The inscriptions Lawrence wrote in copies of his books, often exuberant in style, ranged from the basic to the humorous and ironical, the grateful and reminiscent to the insightful and visionary. In this detailed survey, the result of several years’ work, I will explore this neglected area of Lawrence studies, reporting on whom Lawrence favoured with presentation copies (and how that changed over time) and how the inscriptions vary. I will also assess the extent to which they relate to his letters. Individual inscribed copies of Lawrence’s books have been used in the Cambridge Edition and subsequent critical works to illustrate or prove a particular point but they need to be collected together and analysed. In this study I also include Lawrence’s own copies (which I refer to in passing) and complimentary copies without inscriptions.1

  • 2 For example, there is a copy of Birds, Beasts and Flowers inscribed “Swinburne Hale / from D.H. Law (...)

2Under terms of his contract with his publisher, Lawrence was entitled to a number of free copies of each of his books. For example, with Secker it was initially six (Liv 261), with Seltzer it was ten (Liii 732) and with Knopf it was also ten (Lvi 432). Lawrence paid for the rest (Liii 629). Lawrence gave away at least twenty-one copies of The Lost Girl in addition to his own six free copies, grumbling that Secker charged him trade price plus postage for those copies (LG lii – liii). Readers of the Cambridge Edition Letters volumes will have regularly come across Lawrence’s instructions to his publishers to send out books direct, with names and addresses for recipients of the books provided (leaving no opportunity for Lawrence to inscribe them). They were also sent out by Lawrence
on an ad hoc basis after the initial list had been sent to the publishers.2 Even though there are themes in the lists of recipients sent to publishers at certain periods, the large numbers of letters that he sent to publishers about other complimentary copies suggest the haphazard way in which Lawrence organised his giving.

  • 3 Agnes Mason’s read “Addiscombe 27 January 1911. To Agnes from her sincere and grateful friend D.H. (...)

3As was the case with his letters, Lawrence’s inscriptions varied considerably in length and content. In the majority of books it is limited to little more than the name of the recipient and Lawrence’s signature (or sometimes signing even more formally as “the author”), for example in The Captain’s Doll inscribed to Achsah Brewster, compared to the often lengthy letters to the same recipients or the inscribed copies of The Trespasser provided for his sister-in-law Else and for Henry Savage.. A good selection of inscriptions is to be found in copies of The White Peacock, the first English edition published on 20th January 1911. Examples include the advance copy Lawrence obtained for his mother days before she died which was inscribed “2nd December 1910. To My Mother, with love, D.H. Lawrence” (Li 194 n.3). As with his letters, Lawrence generally avoided the use of his Christian name in his inscriptions, even to his closest family and friends. That for his fiancée Louie Burrows merely read “Addiscombe 20 Jan 1911. Louie from D.H. Lawrence” (sold at Sotheby’s in 2008).3 These are generally unexceptional inscriptions for a man of Lawrence’s talents but as his career developed so did the variety and interest of his inscriptions.

4Before looking in more detail at individual inscriptions, I will review who received books from Lawrence, by reference to the tables provided (see below). By way of explanation, next to the usual Cambridge Edition abbreviations for individual titles, I have where available provided the principal reference in the Letters for that title. This reproduces the list of intended recipients that Lawrence sent to his publisher for that title. I have marked with a capital “I” a book that bears an inscription to the recipient named along the top of thetable and a capital “D” where an individual has had that book dedicated to him. The references to the Letters volumes under the names are the sources of information for their having complimentary copies, inscribed or not. Where there are two such references then the recipient was sent two different editions of the same title. As you will see there is the very occasional title, such as My Skirmish with Jolly Roger, where it has not been possible to trace a complimentary copy. It is also worth mentioning that there will inevitably be some inscribed volumes that their owners had purchased (sometimes before first meeting Lawrence), not been given by Lawrence, and that a number of the inscribed copies are not of first editions, usually because Lawrence had no connection with the recipient when the book was first published. For example, Walter Wilkinson’s copy of The Lost Girl is of the 1927 reprint, not the 1920 first edition.

  • 4 Inscribed books in private hands continue to come to light as do those from other sources, and book (...)

5The information in the tables are based on what is available from working through the Letters volumes, together with a survey, carried out over several years, of auction records, book catalogues, biographies, websites selling books and online university catalogues. Although some of the books listed here will be part of its collection, the tables do not include all the relevant books that are at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas as the information required is not available online. The survey does though include the relevant titles from the Willie Hopkin collection at Eastwood Public Library and the Lazarus collection at the University of Nottingham.4

6To minimise the size of the tables they do not include the several relatively brief acquaintances of Lawrence who were not major players in his life, nor does it include recipients about whom little if anything is known. The aim is to show patterns. For example, it can be immediately seen that Lawrence’s sisters received copies of most if not all of his books, and that his brother George appears to have received far fewer. The Lawrence biographies say little about him after the violent quarrel the two brothers had at Christmas 1915 (see for example Kinkead-Weekes 295, Lii 489). But Lawrence did not stop sending him books then, he was to receive Amores, published in July 1916 and he was still “on the list” in 1920 when The Lost Girl was published. But it is reasonable to conclude from what he was sent that the relationship became more distant – Nottingham University holds copies of Lawrence books inscribed to George by his son in 1927 and 1928, suggesting that complimentary copies had ceased by that time. Although his sisters received copies of the majority of books, other recipients were targeted. His selection of books for individuals was shrewd. For example, a copy of Psychoanalysis and the Unconscious was sent to pioneer in psychoanalysis Barbara Low and to her brother-in-law Dr. David Eder, an early Freudian psychoanalyst. And a copy of Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine went to S.S. Koteliansky (“Kot”) “because it contains ‘The Crown’: in memory of Signature days” (Lv 374).

7Generally the number of complimentary copies provided reflects the nature of the relationship Lawrence had with a recipient, and how long it lasted. Lawrence had a mainly good relationship with his sisters throughout his writing career, as reflected in the number of books they were sent, and of course the number of letters they received. This applies to friends too, such as Catherine Carswell, Kot, Dorothy Brett and the Brewsters, but over varying periods

8Moving onto the content of the inscriptions, I will look first at the humour to be found in them, even in Lawrence’s own copies, unlikely to be read by many others. He wrote in his copy of Love Poems and Others the words “D.H. Lawrence - his own copy not given to anybody,” and his copies of Amores, Movements in European History, Birds, Beasts and Flowers and Mornings in Mexico bear similar inscriptions. Even more amusingly his copy of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, one of two on blue paper, contains the words “This edition is limited to only two copies one for the master one for the dame none for the little boy that lives down the lane” (Melvin). A copy of Psychoanalysis and the Unconscious that is inscribed, probably for his agent Robert Mountsier, reads “Signed, errors and all, D.H. Lawrence” (Finney 311). One of The Prussian Officer given to Kot at Christmas 1914, refers to Lawrence as “the livin”’ and Kot as “the dead” in his Italian inscription (sold at Christie’s in 2008). Furthermore, I have written recently in the Journal of D.H. Lawrence Studies about the amusing limerick appearing in a copy of The Rainbow provided to an unidentified recipient, which is reproduced there (JDHLS Volume 4, Number 1 (2015) 13-18).

  • 5 In another example Lawrence alluded to his history of being on the move by inscribing to Dolores El (...)

9Secondly, the inscriptions are often sources of irony. Pino Orioli’s copy of Look! We Have Come Through is inscribed “To Pino Orioli these poems - written in that damned Cornwall with sweet and bitter memories of same. D.H. Lawrence” (Melvin).And his copy of Love Poems and Others has the words “To Pino Orioli – in Florence war all over – worse in store. D.H. Lawrence” (Melvin). Vere H. Collins’ copy of Movements in European History is inscribed “By the Author in all but name” (Nehls Volume One 472) and Robert Mountsier’s is signed “otherwise D.H. Lawrence to Robert Mountsier” (Cushman 204), reflecting the fact that when the book was first published it was under the nom de plume of Lawrence H. Davison.5 Predictably, Lady Chatterley’s Lover provides two very good examples of Lawrence’s most memorable inscriptions. The first was for Edward Garnett, reading “To Edward Garnett who sowed the first seed of this book years ago at the Cearne – and may not like the full fruit” (Jefferson 270). This followed Lawrence’s letter to David Garnett of 24th August 1928 in which he noted Garnett’s appreciation of the book and continued:

I should like to give your father a copy, if he’d care for it. Let me know, will you, and if to send to the Cearne. In my early days your father said to me “I should welcome a description of the whole act” – which has stayed in my mind till I wrote this book. – But your mother would disapprove. (Lvi 520)

  • 6 This was reproduced in JDHLS Volume 2, Number 2 (2010), 160.

10The second is the copy of the Paris Popular edition of Lady Chatterley’s Lover given by Lawrence to Dorothy Morland, the wife of Dr. Andrew Morland, who assessed Lawrence’s condition when he visited him in Bandol in January 1930. His inscription wished “good luck to both of us.” She acknowledged her tuberculosis and lived into old age.6 He died in denial of his condition within weeks of writing this, the inscription in as bold a hand as any of his earlier ones.

11The inscriptions reveal a wide variety of information and serve many purposes. A small example is Millicent Beveridge’s copy of The Plumed Serpent, held at the University of Nottingham, which confirms that he was at her flat on a particular date. Another is the use of a complimentary book as a means of trying to rekindle a friendship. Lawrence sent Eddie Marsh a copy of New Poems in May 1919 as a “peace offering” after a gap during World War I when Marsh was working for the government and Lawrence was against the war (Finch item 18, Liii 358). McLeod’s copy of Glad Ghosts (Lv 641-2) and Garnett’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover both followed breaks in correspondence. Lawrence’s well-known letter to Ottoline Morrell of 8th May 1928 attempting to renew their friendship after a “long lapse” (Lvi 394) was followed by an inscribed copy of The Story of Doctor Manente, published in 1929. The theme of reminiscence in the Ottoline Morell letter is very apparent in some of Lawrence’s inscriptions. Phyllis Whitworth’s copy of Mornings in Mexico is inscribed “remembering David May 1927” (Forster lot 88) - she had produced the play. McLeod’s copy of Love Poems and Others is inscribed:

To my friend A.W. McLeod Remembering the unhappy days and the happy play-times at Davidson when I solaced myself with his appreciation of some of these miserable poems D.H. Lawrence (Forster lot 10)

  • 7 The Vigie was an old fort, loaned to Richard Aldington, the circumstances described in Brigit Patmo (...)

12In similar vein, these inscriptions regularly demonstrate Lawrence’s affection for the recipient. For example, the copy of Sun given to Brigit Patmore has the inscription “to Brigit the angel in the Vigie from D.H. Lawrence Port Cros. All Saints Day 1928” (Finch item 75). This was at a time when Lawrence’s relationship with Frieda was strained and he was being well looked after by a much more sympathetic Brigit Patmore.7 In another example, Lawrence inscribed a copy of Amores to Dollie Radford “To Dollie Radford from D.H. Lawrence with love at the beloved Zennor. 1st August 1916” (Finch item 14). In passing I’ll note Lawrence’s usual inconsistency, the copy of Look! We Have Come Through referred to above inscribed to Orioli “written in that damned Cornwall with sweet and bitter memories of same.”

  • 8 Lawrence (David Herbert, 1885-1930). The Lost Girl, (Novels, thin-paper edition), 1927, author's si (...)

13Lawrence’s affection for the Wilkinsons is well recorded and an example is the inscription appearing in a copy of The Lost Girl8 : “Walter Wilkinson from D.H. Lawrence for he was a jolly young show-man at the Villa Poggi/14 Marzo 1927.”

Fig.1 Wilkinson’s copy

Dominic Winter Book Auctions- Wednesday 21 July 2010

14Inscriptions can also confirm Lawrence’s intentions in a text, such as Willie Hopkin being the model for a character in Touch and Go in the ambiguous words “Here you are Willie! D.H.L.” the book (held at Eastwood Public Library) annotated by Hopkin accordingly.

15Recording thanks was another reason for the gift of a book, such as the copy of Sea and Sardinia inscribed “Lilian Gair Wilkinson from D.H. Lawrence, with many thanks for her kindness & her cake. 26 July 1927,” or Orioli’s copy of Mornings in Mexico inscribed “Pino from D.H. Lawrence, very grateful for the many little things he did. 24 July 1927,” (both books held at the University of Nottingham).

16Furthermore, Lawrence even purchased a number of additional copies of Glad Ghosts to use as Christmas cards (Lv 596). Help and support received by Lawrence earlier in his career were also acknowledged, for example, not only was Sons and Lovers dedicated to Edward Garnett but his copy has the inscription “To my friend and protector in love and literature Edward Garnett from the Author” (Li 477 n4). And a copy of Love Poems and Others is inscribed “To Ford Madox Hueffer, remembering he discovered me” (Li 14). But notwithstanding his appreciation of Orioli’s work on Lady Chatterley’s Lover, the copy of that book inscribed to him, held at the University of Nottingham, merely reads “Pino from D.H. Lawrence.’

17Lawrence also took the opportunity to record his feelings about the reception of his books. Orioli’s copy of Collected Poems, held at the University of Nottingham, has the inscription “to Pino from D.H. Lawrence celebrating our introduction of Lady C into a hard world.” Some of Lawrence’s most memorable inscriptions marked particular landmarks in his life. For example, when first planning to come to Taos he inscribed a copy of Tortoises “D.H. Lawrence to Mabel Dodge Sterne on the eve of coming to Taos. xxix. XII. 1921.” But he changed his mind as recorded in his letters to her (Liv 181and 202) and his eventual arrival was recorded in a copy of Women in Love:

Mabel Sterne from D.H. Lawrence on arriving in Taos 11th September 1922 (part of the Maurice F. Neville Collection of Modern Literature sold at Sotheby’s in 2004)

18In another example, the publication of the Paris Popular edition of Lady Chatterley’s Lover was recorded:

To Edward W. Titus from D.H. Lawrence this first copy of our Lady of Paris. Forte dei Marmi. 26 June 1929. (part of the Annette Campbell-White Collection sold at Sotheby’s on 7 June 2007)

19However, as well as providing information and insight, we are left with some books with enigmatic inscriptions. For example, why did Lawrence in Barbara Low’s copy of Amores (figure 2) write that it was given “grudgingly” (Forster 30)? And to what was Lawrence referring when he inscribed a copy of Studies in Classic American Literature “Clarence Thompson from D.H. Lawrence afterwards no button left in the basket” (Cushman 204)? And equally puzzling is Stephensen’s copy of Sun where the inscription includes the words “having that laughing horse say: amor vincit” (Forster lot 85).

Fig. 2  Barbara Low’s copy of Amores

20Lawrence’s eagerness to be generous was evident in his correspondence. For example in his letter to Pinker of 30th August 1917 he asked if Chatto would increase the number of presentation copies from six to twelve (JDHLS Volume 4, Number 1 (2015) 8) and in a letter to Secker of 10th November 1920, typically asking for copies of his various publications to be sent out, he wrote “There is no end to me and my sendings.” In the absence of sufficient free copies, he even gave Willie Hopkin proofs of The Prussian Officer and Other Stories as “perhaps you will accept them in lieu of a bound volume” (Lii 259). He had previously written to Arthur McLeod:

I do wish I had a copy of The Prussian Officer to send you. But various thieves who call themselves friends carried off copies they could well afford to buy, and I am badly off, through the war. (Lii 255)

21However, he expected a thank you. In a letter to Cynthia Asquith of 11th June 1921 he wrote:

No, you never even acknowledged receipt of The Lost Girl? And Secker sent it. Bad manners. – Nor did Eddie Marsh. V. bad manners. And I know I paid Secker 8/6 per copy. Die Welt ist Kaput. (Liv 33)

  • 9 He wrote to Ada in almost identical terms (Lvi 413 – 4).

22In the surviving letters Lawrence was often asking if books had been received – i.e. no thank you had been received! He wrote to Emily on 28th May 1928 “I suppose you had The Woman Who Rode Away – Secker said he sent it.”9 His generosity to his sisters was tested. As he wrote to Catherine Carswell on 24th January 1922:

I sent you the chap-book of Tortoises. Hope you have it. My sisters irritate me by rather loftily disapproving. I really am through with them: shall send them no more of my books. Basta? (Liv 174). And he sent Ada a copy of Aaron’s Rod “in spite of the fact that you won’t like it”(Liv 303). This sentiment did not just relate to his family: as he wrote to E.M. Forster on 6 November 1916, in the context of Amores “I get sick of giving people my books” (Liii 20).

  • 10 Ada’s unfavourable response is reflected in Lvii 127 and there was a clear message to Emily not to (...)

23But Lawrence’s generosity was not unlimited – Lady Chatterley’s Lover was privately printed and there were no publisher’s complimentary copies. As he mentioned in his letter to Secker of 22nd May 1928 (Lvi 405) he did not intend to give away any of the one thousand copies of the first edition, only a cheaper or second edition. The first edition was an expensive book, selling for £2 in England, $10 in America – typically 7/6 and $2.50 respectively for his other books at this time. Lawrence’s Memoranda Book (held at Northwestern University Library), detailing receipts for copies of the first edition, records cheques received from many of those listed in the tables who had received complimentary copies of other books at this time e.g. Barbara Low, Catherine Carswell, and Millie Beveridge. And the inscribed copies I have located are all of the cheaper Paris Popular edition that followed the Florence first edition except the copy inscribed to Garnett. Lawrence’s view changed slightly over time. He subsequently wanted Maria Huxley (one of the typists) to be given a copy (Lvi 428). Furthermore, having left his sisters off the circulation list he wrote to Orioli “Since my sisters know all about Lady C from the fuss in John Bull etc, I have to give them a copy, for they are mortally offended” (Lvii 68).10

24One copy of Lady Chatterley’s Lover was destined for Dr Andrew Morland, who would not take a fee (Lvii 650 and see the Journal of D.H. Lawrence Studies article cited below). Another was for his doctor in Florence Dr. Giglioli (Lvi 462-3) but when thanking him he billed Lawrence as well, the bill more than seven times the price of the book! (Lvi 480). Helen Stone in her dissertation on the marketing of Lady Chatterley’s Lover mentions that Enid Hilton and Arabella Yorke were also given complimentary copies for their part in the book’s distribution (Stone lxxiii – lxxiv).

25Providing copies gave Lawrence an opportunity for a review of or commentary on his own books, none more so than The Plumed Serpent. In a letter to Mabel Dodge Luhan of 16th January 1926 he wrote “You may perhaps like it: not many people will: but I do, myself” (Lv 379). And on 1st February 1926, he wrote to Harold Mason:

And did you get a copy of The Plumed Serpent I ordered for you? Povero di me, I could weep over that book, I do so hate its being published and going into the tuppenny hands of the tuppenny public. Small private editions are really much more to my taste. Odio profanum vulgum [I despise the uninitiated mob]. (Lv 387)

  • 11 On a more positive note he was equally capable of expressing his pleasure with the books he was pre (...)

26Referring to the copy he had ordered Catherine Carswell, Lawrence observed “I’m afraid you’ll find it heavy” (Lv 402).11

  • 12 Lawrence’s generosity is to be found in the books by other writers that he inscribed. There is an e (...)

27Drawing these different elements together, it is apparent that the history of Lawrence’s presentation copies provides a rich resource of important material for biographers, supplementing the information about Lawrence’s relationships we already have from other sources, such as his letters. It fills in gaps, provides a greater understanding and supplies interesting insights. The tables provide a timeline that reflects the course of some of his relationships. He was occasionally driven mad by the process of providing copies of his books but generally this survey suggests that Lawrence was a more generous man than he is often given credit for.12

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Cushman, Keith. “A Profile of John Martin and his Lawrence Collection,” D.H. Lawrence Review (Summer 1974), 199 – 205.

Finch, Simon. An Exceptional Collection of First Editions, Autograph Material, Manuscripts, Original Paintings, Photographs, and Association Items. Simon Finch Catalogue 51 (2002).

Finney, Brian H. “A Profile of Mr. George Lazarus and his Lawrence Collection of Manuscripts and First Editions” D.H. Lawrence Review (Fall 1973), 309 – 12.

Forster, Bob. Catalogue of the Extensive Collections of Printed Books relating to D.H. Lawrence and Bibliography. The Property of the Late Bob Forster. Bloomsbury Book Auctions Sale 327 (1998).

Jefferson, George. Edward Garnett: A Life in Literature. Jonathan Cape Ltd., 1982.

Kinkead-Weekes, Mark. D.H. Lawrence: Triumph to Exile 1912 – 1922. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Lawrence, D.H. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume One: September 1901 – May 1913. Ed. James T. Boulton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1979.

…… The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume Two: June 1913 – October 1916. Ed. George J. Zytaruk and James T. Boulton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981.

…… The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume Three: October 1916 – June 1921. Ed. James T. Boulton and Andrew Robertson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984.

…… The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume Four: June 1921 – March 1924. Ed. Warren Roberts James T. Boulton and Elizabeth Mansfield. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

…… The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume Five: March 1924 – March 1927. Ed. James T. Boulton and Lindeth Vasey. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.

…… The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume Six: March 1927 – November 1928. Ed. James T. Boulton and Margaret Boulton with Gerald M. Lacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

…… The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume Seven: November 1928 - February 1930. Ed. Keith Sagar and James T. Boulton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

…… The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume Eight: Previously Uncollected Letters. Ed. James T. Boulton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

…… The Lost Girl. Ed. John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1981.

…… “The Bad Side of Books” in Introductions and Reviews 75-78 Ed. N.H. Reeve and John Worthen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2005.

Melvin Rare Books. A Catalogue of Rare Books by D.H. Lawrence. Edinburgh, n.d. (1948).

Nehls, Edward. D.H. Lawrence: A Composite Biography. 3 volumes. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1957-9.

Poplawski, Paul.”‘The Front Ears of Fiction, the Backside of Books: Lawrence’s Response to A Bibliography of the Writings of D.H. Lawrence (1925) by Edward McDonald” in “’Terra Incognita’ D.H. Lawrence at the Frontiers.” Edited by Virginia Crosswhite Hyde and Earl G. Ingersoll. Madison, Teaneck: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 2010.

Roberts, Warren and Paul Poplawski. A Bibliography of D.H. Lawrence. Third Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Stone, Helen E. “The Lost Ladies: The Marketing & Sale of the Florentine Editions of Lady Chatterley’s Lover,” unpublished M.A. dissertation, University Nottingham, 1995.

Haut de page

Annexe

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (1)

 

Lydia

George

Emily

Ada

Louie

WP [L1 221]

L1 194 etc.

I

 

 

I

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

?

SL (L2 19)

 

L2 19

L2 19

I L2 19

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

L2 402

I

 

TI

 

I

 

 

 

Am

 

I

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

L3 494

L3 494

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

L3 729

L3 729

 

LG

 

LG lii-liii

LG lii-liii

LG lii-liii

 

MEH

 

 

L5 278

L5 324

 

PU

 

 

L5 323

L4 342

 

Tor

 

 

L4 174

L4 174

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

 

 

AR (L4 261)

 

 

L4 299

L4 299

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

L4 342

L4 342

 

EmyE

 

 

I L4 342

L4 342

 

Fox

 

 

L4 431

L4 449

 

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

L5 80

L5 80

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

L5 247

L5 247

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

 

L5 226

L5 226

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

L5 329

L5 329

 

PS

 

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

L5 413

L5 413

 

Sun

 

 

L5 607

L5 599

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

L5 607

L5 599

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

L6 67

L6 67

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

L6 325

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

F

 

L7 232

L7 232

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

 

L6 396

L6 396

 

LCL

 

 

L7 68

L7 68

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

L7 557

L7 557

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

L7 128

L7 330

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

 

L7 321,347

L7 321,347

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

L7 559

L7 573

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

L7 582

L7 532

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (2)

 

Agnes M

Helen

Garnett

Dunlop

Savage

WP [L1 221]

I

I

L1 317

 

 

T

 

 

 

L2 175-6

I JDHLS 2.3.214

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

 

 

D I L1 477

L2 175-6

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

I

 

 

 

I L2 153

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

L4 115

 

 

LG

 

 

 

 

 

MEH

 

 

 

 

 

PU

 

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

 

 

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

 

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

 

 

EmyE

 

 

 

 

 

Fox

 

 

 

 

 

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

 

 

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

 

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

 

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

 

 

 

 

LCL

 

 

I L6 520

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

 

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (3)

 

Else

Jessie

Dax

Holbrook

Hueffer

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

I

 

 

 

 

LP

 

L1 531

 

I

I L1 14

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

D

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

JDHLS 4.1.71

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

 

LG

 

 

 

 

 

MEH

 

 

 

 

 

PU

 

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

 

 

AR (L4 261)

L4 264

 

 

 

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

L4 259

 

 

 

 

EmyE

 

 

 

 

 

Fox

 

 

 

 

 

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

JDHLS 2.1.12

 

 

 

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

L6 275

 

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

L5 417

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

 

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

 

 

 

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

L6 589

 

 

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

L7 362

 

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

L7 630

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (4)

 

McLeod

Orioli

Leader Williams

Jones

Purnell

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

I (L1 488)

I

I

 

 

SL (L2 19)

L2 19

 

 

L2 19

L4 538

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

I

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

I

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

 

LG

 

I

L4 196

 

 

MEH

 

 

 

 

 

PU

 

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

L4 196

 

 

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

 

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

 

 

EmyE

 

 

 

 

 

Fox

 

 

 

 

 

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

I

 

 

JDHLS 2.1.12

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

I

 

 

L5 235

RDP (L5 329)

 

I

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

L5 640

I

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

I

 

 

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

I

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

L6 396

 

 

L6 432

LCL

 

I

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

I L6 591

 

 

L7 486

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

I L7 320

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

L7 573

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (5)

 

M Harrison

Morrell

Huntingdon

Krenkow

Kot

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

I

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

L2 315

I

 

 

PO

 

 

 

I

I

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

D

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

I

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

L3 725

LG

 

 

 

LG lii-liii

L3 632

MEH

 

 

 

 

 

PU

 

 

 

 

I L4 23

Tor

 

 

 

 

L4 185

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

 

L4 193

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

 

L4 275

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

 

L4 387

EmyE

 

 

 

 

 

Fox

 

 

 

 

 

SCAL

 

 

 

 

L4 499

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

JDHLS 2.1.12

 

 

 

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

 

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

L5 374

PS

I

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

L6 69

 

 

 

L6 69

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

L6 396

 

 

 

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

L7 97

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

 

L6 603

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

I

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

L7 347

 

 

 

L7 321

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

L7 575?

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (6)

 

Campbell

Asquiths

Forrester

Carswell

Lowell

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

L2 644

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

L2 250

 

 

 

 

R

 

L2 405

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

L2 627

L2 644

Am

 

L2 649

 

 

L3 32

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

L3 294

 

 

D L3 290

Bay

 

D

 

 

L3 475

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

L3 485

WL (L3 729)

 

L4 32

 

 

L3 629

LG

 

L4 33

 

L3 608

L3 629

MEH

 

 

 

I L3 701

 

PU

 

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

I L4 153

 

SS (L4 193)

 

L4 193

Nehls II 158

L4 123

 

AR (L4 261)

 

L4 261

 

I L4 270

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

 

 

EmyE

 

 

Nehls II 481 n96

L4 362

 

Fox

 

 

 

I

 

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

L4 513

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

 

L5 81

L5 198

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

L5 247

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

 

 

L5 226

L5 230

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

L5 401

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

 

I

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

 

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

 

 

L6 430

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

 

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (7)

 

Low

Dollie Radford

Mansfield

Marsh

Hopkins

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

L2 655

 

 

 

I

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

I

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

L2 514

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

I

I

I

 

 

LWH

 

I

 

 

 

NP

 

I

 

I L3 358

I L3 292

Bay

 

 

 

L3 487

(L3 292 n.2)

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

I

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

 

LG

LG lii-liii

 

 

L3 611

LG lii-liii

MEH

 

 

 

L3 487

 

PU

L4 37

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

 

AR (L4 261)

L4 261

 

 

 

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

 

 

EmyE

 

 

 

 

 

Fox

 

 

 

 

 

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

 

 

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

 

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

L5 413

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

L6 69

 

 

 

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

L6 432

 

 

 

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

L7 380

 

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (8)

 

Monroe

Brooks

Juta

Luhan

Beveridge

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

TI xlviii

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

L3 304

L3 470

L3 586

 

 

Bay

 

 

L3 535

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

L3 706

 

I

I

LG

 

L3 703

LG lii-liii

 

 

MEH

 

 

 

 

 

PU

 

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

I L4 181

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

 

 

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

L4 259

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

L4 259

 

EmyE

 

 

 

 

I

Fox

 

 

 

 

I

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

L4 515

 

BBF

L4 540

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

I

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

 

JDHLS 2.1.12

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

 

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

 

I

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

D L6 69

L6 69

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

 

 

L6 293

L6 396

LCL

 

 

 

L6 433

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

L7 387

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

 

L7 414

L7 347

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (9)

 

Kippenbergs

Cannan

Hubrecht

Freeman

Wilkinsons

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

L3 681

L3 695

L3 727

L4 493

 

LG

L3 681

LG lii-liii

L3 607

 

I

MEH

 

 

L3 533

 

I

PU

L4 40

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

L4 193

L4 162

L4 192

 

I

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

 

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

 

 

EmyE

 

L4 352

 

L4 361

 

Fox

 

 

 

L4 392

 

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

 

 

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

L6 291

 

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

 

I

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

 

 

 

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

 

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (10)

 

Goldring

Douglas

Hansard

Wheelock

Mountsier

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

L3 485

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

L3 619

LG

L3 625

L3 639

L3 648

L3 648

 

MEH

 

 

 

 

I L3 696

PU

 

 

 

 

I

Tor

 

 

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

 

 

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

 

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

 

 

EmyE

 

 

 

 

 

Fox

 

 

 

 

I

SCAL

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

 

 

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

 

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

 

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

 

 

 

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

I

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

I L7 376

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (11)

 

Vere Collins

McDonald

Eder

Brewsters

Murry

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

I

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

I

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

 

LG

 

 

 

 

 

MEH

I

L5 272

 

 

 

PU

 

 

L4 37

I L4 95

L4 377

Tor

 

 

 

I L4 154

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

I

 

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

L4 265

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

 

 

I L4 259

L4 375

EmyE

 

 

 

I

L4 377

Fox

 

 

 

I

 

SCAL

 

 

 

L5 80

L4 500

K

 

 

 

I

 

BBF

 

 

 

I

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

 

L5 135, JDHLS 2.1.12

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

L5 247

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

L5 231

 

 

L5 226

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

L5 375

I

L5 329

PS

 

 

 

I L5 373

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

I

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

I

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

L6 69

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

L6 432

 

I L6 318

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

L6 593

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

I

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

 

 

I L7 317

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

I

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (12)

 

Thompson

Baynes

Pearn

Anna von R

Elsa Weekley

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

 

LG

 

LG lii-liii

 

LG lii-liii

 

MEH

 

 

 

 

 

PU

L5 106

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

L4 190

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

L5 58

L4 190

I

L4 121

L4 193

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

 

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

L5 106

 

 

 

 

EmyE

 

 

 

 

 

Fox

 

 

 

L4 396

 

SCAL

I

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

BBF

 

 

 

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

 

 

JDHLS 2.1.12

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

L5 247

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

 

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

 

 

L5 607

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

 

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

 

 

 

 

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

L7 23

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

 

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (13)

 

Conway

Forster

Carter

Curtis Brown

Marchbanks

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

 

LG

 

 

 

 

 

MEH

 

 

 

 

 

PU

 

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

L5 264

 

 

 

 

AR (L4 261)

 

 

 

 

 

FU (L4 449 n4)

 

I L4 301

L4 457

 

 

EmyE

 

 

 

I

I

Fox

 

 

L4 457

 

 

SCAL

 

L5 80

 

 

 

K

 

 

L4 547

 

 

BBF

 

 

I L4 547

 

 

Mastro-Don Gesualdo

 

 

 

 

 

BB (L5 80, JDHLS 2.1.12)

 

L5 81

 

 

 

Little Novels of Sicily (L5 247)

 

 

 

 

 

St Mawr (L5 226)

 

L5 226

 

 

 

RDP (L5 329)

 

 

 

 

 

PS

 

 

 

 

 

David (L5 413)

 

 

 

 

 

Sun

 

 

 

 

 

Glad Ghosts

JDHLS 1.3.7

 

 

 

 

MM (L6 69)

 

 

 

 

 

Cavalleria Rusticana

 

 

 

 

 

Rawdon’s Roof (L7 232)

 

 

 

 

 

WWRA (L6 396, 432)

L6 432

 

 

 

 

LCL

 

 

 

 

 

Collected Poems (L6 602, L7 387)

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of Doctor Manente

 

 

 

 

 

The Paintings of D. H. Lawrence

 

 

 

 

 

Pansies (L7 321, 347, 380, 414)

 

 

 

 

 

Pornography and Obscenity (L7 573)

 

 

 

 

 

The Escaped Cock

 

 

 

 

 

D.H.Lawrence, complimentary copies and their recipients (14)

 

AC Henderson

Götzsche

Merrild

Walkers

Johnson

WP [L1 221]

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

LP

 

 

 

 

 

SL (L2 19)

 

 

 

 

 

The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd

 

 

 

 

 

PO

 

 

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

TI

 

 

 

 

 

Am

 

 

 

 

 

LWH

 

 

 

 

 

NP

 

 

 

 

 

Bay

 

 

 

 

 

Touch and Go

 

 

 

 

 

WL (L3 729)

 

 

 

 

 

LG

 

 

 

 

 

MEH

 

 

 

 

 

PU

 

 

 

 

 

Tor

 

 

 

 

 

SS (L4 193)

 

 

 

I

 

AR (L4 261)