Navigation – Plan du site

Understanding Brexit: Insights, analyses and perspectives

Comprendre le Brexit : Enjeux, analyses et perspectives
Laetitia Langlois et Maud Michaud

Understanding Brexit: Insights, analyses and perspectives

  • 1 Talkradio, 25 June 2019, https://talkradio.co.uk/news/boris-johnson-will-leave-eu-do-or-die-come-w (...)
  • 2 Patrick Cockburn, “Brexiteers like Boris Johnson must realise that past British successes were bas (...)
  • 3 Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson, Rule Britannia, Brexit and the End of Empire, London, Biteback (...)
  • 4 David Goodhart, The British Dream: Successes and Failures of Post-War Immigration, London, Atlanti (...)
  • 5 Quoted in Steven Erlanger, “No One Knows What Britain is Anymore”, The New York Times, November 4, (...)
  • 6 Pippa Norris and Ronald Inglehart, Cultural Backlash: Trump, Brexit and Authoritarian Populism, Ca (...)

In June 2019, Boris Johnson pledged that Britain was “ready to come out on 31 October. Do or die. Come what may.”1 But Johnson’s pledge was crushed on October 19th as Parliament, once again, chose to postpone a vote on the deal until legislation needed to turn the withdrawal agreement into UK law was completed, leaving the British and the rest of the world flabbergasted. At the time of writing, the EU has accepted a further extension of Britain’s exit until January 31st 2020. Thus, uncertainty and chaos still prevail in a country that, The Independent put it, “once seemed to possess the secret of stability [but] has become permanently self-absorbed in its own divisions.”2 Indeed, divisions is what best characterizes today’s (not so) United Kingdom. Britain is more than ever a fragmented, bruised and battered nation facing a dire future in the hands of a political class that has been unable so far to appease people’s anxieties and the international community’s expectations on Brexit. The bombastic resignations by former ministers, the parliamentary drama, the feuds over the Irish backstop, the hesitations and incompetence of ministers in charge, all contribute to give a poor image of Britain as a country groping to find a new destiny and a new identity outside of the European Union. Brexit is more than the EU, and to paraphrase Theresa May, if “Brexit means Brexit”, we may wonder if it is still just about the EU. Brexit is a desperate fight to regain national and international prestige in a country which is still haunted by the vestiges of the Empire and the legacy of Thatcherism. The “national narcissism”3 we are observing as the Brexit negotiations linger on is sign of the ongoing questionings on Britain’s identity. As a nation, Britain has lost track of what holds it together. The four nations no longer adhere to London’s domination, multiculturalism has failed as have the European ambitions. What is left then of the “British dream”4? Charles Grant, director of the Center for European Reform, expressed Britain’s plight in those words: “Confused and divided, Britain no longer has an agreed-upon national narrative.”5 Leaving the European Union is a last attempt to regain confidence and control in a world of constant fluidity and changing paradigms. Thus, the appeals to sovereignty and white Anglo-Saxon identity had a particular echo on a population left vulnerable by years of globalisation, mass immigration and cultural liberalism.6

  • 7 Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson, Op. Cit., p. 324.

Condensed in the appealing slogan “Take back control” created by Dominic Cummings, mastermind of the Leave campaign, Brexiteers promised a better, brighter ‘Global Britain’. As the EU was the scapegoat for all British evils, Brexit was marketed as the panacea to resolve all problems: more sovereignty, more democracy and less immigration. One reason that has often been put forward to explain the disillusions on Europe is that it failed to deliver the successes promised. Surely the same can be said of Brexit. Lies, deceits, broken promises and thwarted hopes is all that Brexit could deliver to the British nation so far. What kind of inclusive national narrative can Britain find in this context? Considering the many different fractures affecting British society, how will Britain be able to redress the situation? What gold can there be at the end of the Brexit rainbow?7

Populism, nationalism, racism, jingoism seem to have engulfed Britain so much so that for many people today Britain is simply unrecognizable. Brexit is a seismic event that still needs to be explored and fathomed so monumental are its short-term and long-term repercussions.

Thus, “Understanding Brexit: Insights, Analyses and Perspectives” aims at offering a comprehensive study thanks to contributions by scholars in different disciplines and research fields. We welcome papers dealing with, among others, topics such as:

  • The politics of Brexit: Parliament, Political Parties, Prime Ministers (Cameron, May and Johnson)

  • Brexit and media analysis: the role played by tabloids and social media

  • Brexit, populism and the retreat of Western liberalism

  • Ideologies, values and ideas underpinning Brexit

  • Propaganda and fake news

  • Brexit and the British economy

  • Brexit and the four nations (The Scottish Question, The Irish backstop, etc)

  • ‘Global Britain’ and the ‘Anglosphere’, Empire 2.0

Brexit and popular culture: ‘Brexlit’, cinema, music, photography, TV shows and series.

Abstracts can be submitted to Laetitia Langlois (laetitia.langlois@univ-angers.fr) and Maud Michaud (maud.michaud@univ-lemans.fr) in French or English and contain no more than 250 words. Deadline for submission: January 31st, 2020. Final articles should comprise between 5,000 and 9,000 words and be submitted no later than April 30, 2020.

Comprendre le Brexit : Enjeux, analyses et perspectives

  • 8 “ready to come out on 31 October. Do or die. Come what may.” Talkradio, 25 Juin 2019, https://talk (...)
  • 9 “once seemed to possess the secret of stability [but] has become permanently self-absorbed in its (...)

Lors d’une interview sur une radio britannique en juin 2019, Boris Johnson assura que le Royaume-Uni était « prêt à sortir [de l’Union Européenne] le 31 octobre. Coûte que coûte. Quoiqu’il arrive »8. Mais seulement 15 jours avant la date fatidique, le Parlement choisit de remettre en question cette promesse en repoussant, une fois encore, le vote afin que le projet de loi sur l’accord de sortie soit d’abord adopté. Alors que le Brexit semblait si proche, cette décision du Parlement prit les Britanniques et le reste du monde au dépourvu. Au moment où cet appel à contributions est rédigé, l’Union Européenne a approuvé un nouveau report de la date du Brexit au 31 janvier 2020. Cependant, le résultat des élections du 12 décembre prochain pourrait redistribuer les cartes. Incertitude et chaos règnent toujours dans un pays qui, comme l’écrit The Independent, « semblait autrefois posséder le secret de la stabilité [mais] est désormais en permanence absorbé par ses propres divisions »9. Le terme « divisions » est en effet celui qui caractérise le mieux le Royaume-(dés)Uni. Plus que jamais, le pays est fragmenté, abîmé et meurtri. Livré à une classe politique incapable d’apaiser les craintes de la population et de répondre aux attentes de la communauté internationale sur la question du Brexit, l’avenir semble des plus sombres pour le Royaume-Uni. Les démissions tapageuses d’anciens ministres, le spectacle grotesque des séances au Parlement, les querelles autour de la frontière irlandaise, les atermoiements et l’incompétence des ministres en charge du dossier, tout ceci contribue à donner la bien piètre image d’un pays qui tente péniblement de se forger un nouveau destin et une nouvelle identité en dehors de l’Union Européenne.

  • 10 “national narcissism”. Danny Dorling et Sally Tomlinson, Rule Britannia, Brexit and the End of Emp (...)
  • 11 David Goodhart, The British Dream: Successes and Failures of Post-War Immigration, Londres, Atlant (...)
  • 12 “Confused and divided, Britain no longer has an agreed-upon national narrative.” Cité dans Steven (...)
  • 13 Pippa Norris et Ronald Inglehart, Cultural Backlash: Trump, Brexit and Authoritarian Populism, Cam (...)

Mais le Brexit va bien au-delà de la question européenne, et pour reprendre les propos de Theresa May, si « Brexit veut dire Brexit », il veut aussi dire bien plus que cela. Le Brexit est une lutte acharnée pour retrouver un prestige national et international dans un pays toujours hanté par les vestiges de l’Empire et l’héritage thatchérien. Le « narcissisme national »10 que nous observons tandis que les discussions autour de la sortie trainent indéfiniment sont le signe de ces interrogations constantes sur ce qu’est l’identité britannique et ce qu’est le Royaume-Uni. En tant que nation, le Royaume-Uni a perdu de vue ce qui fait son ciment et sa cohésion. Les 4 nations refusent la domination de Londres, le multiculturalisme a échoué comme a échoué l’aventure européenne. Que reste-t-il alors du « rêve britannique »11 ? Charles Grant, Directeur du Center for European Reform, décrit la situation actuelle du Royaume-Uni en ces termes : « Désorienté et divisé, le Royaume-Uni n’a désormais plus de récit national autour duquel faire consensus »12. Quitter l’Union Européenne et tracer une autre voie sont le moyen de retrouver confiance et contrôle dans un monde qui ne cesse de changer et de définir de nouveaux modèles. Ainsi, les appels à la souveraineté et à l’identité anglo-saxonne blanche trouvent-elles un écho particulièrement favorable au sein d’une partie de la population fragilisée par des années de mondialisation, d’immigration massive et de libéralisme culturel.13

L’Union Européenne ayant toujours été présentée comme le bouc émissaire idéal des maux du pays, le Brexit a été « vendu » aux Britanniques comme le remède miracle : davantage de souveraineté, davantage de démocratie et moins d’immigration. Résumé dans le slogan accrocheur « Take back control » créé par le cerveau de la campagne pro-Leave, Dominic Cummings, les partisans du Brexit promettaient une ‘Global Britain’ plus forte et plus radieuse. L’une des raisons avancées pour expliquer le désenchantement vis-à-vis de l’Europe est qu’elle n’a pas été à la hauteur des espoirs et des promesses. Aujourd’hui, force est de constater que le Brexit inspire le même sentiment : mensonges, tromperies, et « fake news » résument le Brexit depuis le début de la campagne référendaire. Quel récit national fédérateur peut alors émerger dans ce contexte délétère ? Et comment la nation britannique va-t-elle pouvoir faire face aux multiples divisions qui la menacent ? Quelle lueur peut-il y avoir au bout du tunnel Brexit ?

Populisme, nationalisme, racisme et chauvinisme dévorent le Royaume-Uni à tel point que pour beaucoup aujourd’hui le pays est tout simplement devenu méconnaissable. Le Brexit est un cataclysme qu’il est nécessaire d’analyser et de comprendre tant ses répercussions sur le court et long terme sont considérables.

Ainsi, « Comprendre le Brexit : Enjeux, analyses et perspectives » se veut être une étude approfondie des différents aspects du Brexit grâce aux contributions de chercheurs de disciplines et thématiques de recherches variées. Sont bienvenues les propositions de communication traitant, entre autres, des thèmes suivants :

Brexit et politique : Le Parlement britannique, les partis politiques, les Premiers ministres (Cameron, May and Johnson)

  • Brexit et discours médiatique : le rôle des tabloïds, des médias et des réseaux sociaux

  • Brexit, populisme et le déclin du libéralisme occidental

  • Idéologies, valeurs et courants sous-jacents au Brexit

  • Propagande et « fake news »

  • Le Brexit et l’économie britannique

  • Le Brexit et les 4 nations (la question écossaise, la frontière entre les deux Irlande, etc.)

  • ‘Global Britain’ et ‘Anglosphère’, l’Empire 2.0

  • Brexit et culture populaire : ‘Brexlit’, cinéma, musique, photographie, émissions de TV et séries.

Les propositions de communication d’une longueur d’environ 250 mots doivent être envoyées à Laetitia Langlois (laetitia.langlois@univ-angers.fr) et Maud Michaud (maud.michaud@univ-lemans.fr) en français ou en anglais. Date limite d’envoi des propositions : 31 janvier 2020. Les articles devront comprendre entre 5000 et 9000 mots et être rendus au plus tard le 30 avril 2020.

Notes

1 Talkradio, 25 June 2019, https://talkradio.co.uk/news/boris-johnson-will-leave-eu-do-or-die-come-what-may-19062531434, accessed on October 29, 2019.

2 Patrick Cockburn, “Brexiteers like Boris Johnson must realise that past British successes were based on creating alliances, not breaking them up”, The Independent, 20 July 2018. https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/boris-johnson-brexit-churchill-ww1-napoleon-british-history-a8456916.html, accessed on October 24, 2019.

3 Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson, Rule Britannia, Brexit and the End of Empire, London, Biteback Publishing, 2019. See also Michael Kenny and Nick Pearce, The Anglosphere. Shadows of Empire, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2018.

4 David Goodhart, The British Dream: Successes and Failures of Post-War Immigration, London, Atlantic Books, 2013.

5 Quoted in Steven Erlanger, “No One Knows What Britain is Anymore”, The New York Times, November 4, 2017. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/04/sunday-review/britain-identity-crisis.html, accessed on October 30, 2019.

6 Pippa Norris and Ronald Inglehart, Cultural Backlash: Trump, Brexit and Authoritarian Populism, Cambridge and New York, Cambridge University Press, 2019.

7 Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson, Op. Cit., p. 324.

8 “ready to come out on 31 October. Do or die. Come what may.” Talkradio, 25 Juin 2019, https://talkradio.co.uk/news/boris-johnson-will-leave-eu-do-or-die-come-what-may-19062531434, consulté le 29 octobre, 2019.

9 “once seemed to possess the secret of stability [but] has become permanently self-absorbed in its own divisions.” Patrick Cockburn, “Brexiteers like Boris Johnson must realise that past British successes were based on creating alliances, not breaking them up”, The Independent, 20 Juillet 2018. https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/boris-johnson-brexit-churchill-ww1-napoleon-british-history-a8456916.html, consulté le 24 octobre 2019.

10 “national narcissism”. Danny Dorling et Sally Tomlinson, Rule Britannia, Brexit and the End of Empire, Londres, Biteback Publishing, 2019. Voir aussi Michael Kenny et Nick Pearce, The Anglosphere. Shadows of Empire, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2018.

11 David Goodhart, The British Dream: Successes and Failures of Post-War Immigration, Londres, Atlantic Books, 2013.

12 “Confused and divided, Britain no longer has an agreed-upon national narrative.” Cité dans Steven Erlanger, “No One Knows What Britain is Anymore”, The New York Times, 4 novembre 2017. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/04/sunday-review/britain-identity-crisis.html, consulté le 30 octobre 2019.

13 Pippa Norris et Ronald Inglehart, Cultural Backlash: Trump, Brexit and Authoritarian Populism, Cambridge et New York, Cambridge University Press, 2019.

Haut de page
  • OpenEdition Journals