Skip to navigation – Site map

HomePrésentationRecommendations for authors and b...

Recommendations for authors and bibliographical norms

Recommendations for authors

The papers submitted must not exceed 70 000 characters including spaces for articles, and 10 000 characters including spaces for book reviews; texts must be saved as .doc or .odt or .docx and pdf, in a unicode font. No footnotes in book reviews.

Papers must be written in French or English, or in exceptional cases in German, Spanish or Italian, and be unpublished in the chosen language. They must be followed in any case by an abstract in french and in english, and some keywords.

Greek quotations must be typed in a unicode font, preferably IFAOGrec unicode (IFAO fonts can be downloaded here :
http://www.ifao.egnet.net/publications/publier/outils-ed/polices/).
Every Greek or Latin quotation must be translated. Transliterations can be used, without accents.

Please dont apply any style sheet, but indicate the paper’s subdivisions. Use the current typographic rules in the chosen language.

All images must be supplied as independent high-resolution 300 DPI files with reproduction rights secured and indication of source. Please indicate where you would like to insert them in your text.

Don’t forget to mention your first and second name, the scientific institution where the work was carried out, and the e-mail or mail address for your prints and reprints.

Bibliographical norms

For ancient sources

The title’s form for ancient texts is preferably the Latin form.

Abbreviations may only refer to titles of works and not to the names of authors, with the exception of Diogenes Laertius, who may be mentioned as DL. The abbreviations of the ancient titles are those used by the Liddell-Scott-Jones Greek-English Lexicon for Greek texts and the Oxford Latin Dictionary for Latin texts; for special cases not referenced in these two instruments, the abbreviations of the DGE may be used, which can be consulted on http://dge.cchs.csic.es/lst/3lst1.htm

The abbreviations of instruments should be common (e. g. refer to those listed in the Trismegistos database https://www.trismegistos.org/tm/publication_lookup.php ) and indicated in developed form in the final bibliography. In all cases, when a reference to a source or instrument is first made, the full expanded form of the title should be given as a footnote.

The reference edition of each quoted text is mandatory; it is optional for texts that are only mentioned. In cases where several historical reference editions exist (e. g. for Galen texts), the pagination in both editions should be given if possible.

Manuscripts should be referred to following the current international standard:

Country, City, Library, Collection, Shelfmark

Ex: Italia, Firenze, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana (BML), Plut. 59. 17

For the papyrus, please follow the norms of the Checklist of editions (https://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/scriptorium/papyrus/texts/clist.html).

For footnotes

Allen 2000, p. 18, n. 34.

Aristotle, Metaphysics, M 8, 1084a1-2 (trans. Ross).

Aristotle, Metaph. M 8, 1084a1-2 (ed. Jaeger).

Lucretius, DRN I, 986-987.

For final bibliography

Allen, J. P. 2000 : Middle Egyptian : an introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs, Cambridge, 2000.

Barnes, J. 1981 : « Proof and the Syllogism », dans E. Berti (éd.), Aristotle on Science : the Posterior Analytics : proceedings of the Eighth Symposium Aristotelicum, Padoue, 1981 (Studia Aristotelica, 9), p. 17-59.

Crubellier, M. & P. Pellegrin 1998 : « Approches de la Physique d’Aristote », Oriens-Occidens, 2 (1998), p. 1-37.

Kraut, R. (éd.) 1992 : The Cambridge Companion to Plato, Cambridge, 1992 (Cambridge Companions to Philosophy).

Tricot, J. 1991 (trad.) : Aristote, Métaphysique, traductions et notes, Paris, 1991 (Bibliothèque des textes philosophiques).

Please indicate the series.

For electronic publications you must indicate the DOI or at least the proper url and the access date.

Mentions of « forthcoming » papers are accepted only if you can give a publisher and a final title. Should you have uploaded a draft available online, feel free to provide the link.

You shouldn’t mention the various dates of publishing for a same work, but only the date of the version you actually refer to. The same applies for the translations of a paper or a book.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search