Navigation – Plan du site

AccueilNouvelle série9.2Multidisciplinary approach to col...

Multidisciplinary approach to collective burials in caves and in dolmens at the end of the Neolithic period in Eastern Languedoc and the southern part of the Cévennes—abridged version

Mélie Le Roy et Johanna Recchia-Quiniou
p. 97-118
Cet article est une traduction de :
Approche multidisciplinaire de sépultures collectives en grotte et en dolmen à la fin du Néolithique dans le Languedoc oriental et sud des Cévennes [fr]

Résumés

Depuis 2012, un programme de reprise d’étude des sépultures collectives datées de la fin du Néolithique, début de l’âge du Bronze dans le Languedoc oriental et le sud des Cévennes a été mis en place. L’ensemble des travaux ont suivi le même protocole d’analyse, tant sur le plan biologique (âge au décès, sexe, état sanitaire) que sur les recherches archéoanthropologiques (recrutement, reconstruction du dispositif funéraire), ainsi que sur l’étude du mobilier céramique.

Cet article présente tout d’abord les résultats de ces reprises d’études, discutant la dichotomie observée sur les structures d’accueil de ces ensembles funéraires : cavités et dolmens. Les résultats permettent de distinguer les différences observées à différentes échelles, la structure, le site et la région, dans la gestion des corps et l’organisation des dépôts. On ne remarque pas de différences significatives à l’échelle des deux régions d’intérêt, hormis une sélection culturelle systématique excluant les plus jeunes dans les ensembles funéraires du Languedoc oriental, le sud des Cévennes étant plus varie dans son recrutement funéraire. L’unique élément significatif est la présence de marqueurs d’activité para masticatrice sur les dents d’un nombre limité d’individus inhumes dans les dolmens du sud des Cévennes. Ce résultat suggère une pratique d’artisanat de vannerie ou de tannerie par les populations inhumant leurs morts dans les monuments des contreforts des Cévennes, alors que les sujets retrouvés en cavité ne semblent pas avoir pratiques une telle activité.

Enfin, ces études ont mené à la mise en place de travaux de terrain qui ont permis la mise au jour d’une préparation des sols accueillant les morts, aussi bien en grotte qu’en dolmen. Cette découverte permet d’envisager l’intégration du lieu de dépôt dans la chaine opératoire funéraire des sépultures collectives de la fin du Néolithique. La fonction (symbolique ou technique) de ces aménagements reste encore à confirmer.

Haut de page

Notes de la rédaction

This article is not quite a translation but rather a long summary of the French article “Approche multidisciplinaire de sépultures collectives en grotte et en dolmen à la fin du Néolithique dans le Languedoc oriental et sud des Cévennes”. English abridged version written by the authors, revised and corrected by K. Mazurié de Keroualin (www.linarkeo.fr).
Reçu / Received
01-04-2021 ; Version révisée reçue / Received in revised form 30-09-2021 ; Accepté / Accepted 04-10-2021 ; En ligne / Online 07-12-2021

Texte intégral

Introduction

1The end of the Neolithic in Southern France is a period characterised, among other things, by the emergence of numerous human groups and a variety of geographic facies (Lemercier 2004). The major cultural groups, in eastern Languedoc and the southern part of the Cévennes (fig. 1), are the successive groups of Ferrières (3300-2800 BCE) and Fontbouisse (2900-2200 BCE; Jallot & Gutherz 2014), followed by those of the Early Bronze Age (2300-1800 BCE; Lachenal 2014). There are also traces of Bell Beaker occupations. Yet, incomplete data and the absence of absolute dating make it impossible to characterise the dynamic of occupation of Bell Beaker populations within the region under study (Lemercier 2004). Collective burials in natural (caves or shelters) or artificial (dolmens; Duday 1976) settings are the main funerary rite that characterises these different groups. This duality is made possible by the limestone nature of the Grands Causses and the Cévennes (fig. 1), which thus excludes the possibility of regional variation shaped by the presence (or absence) of inappropriate ground. The grave goods found inside these various burial structures indicate that these occupations were almost contemporaneous and can be assigned to a period between the end of the Neolithic and the beginning of the Bronze Age as confirmed by rare radiocarbon dates (table 1). It therefore seems that the same human groups present at the end of the Neolithic and the beginning of the Bronze Age both used natural cavities and built monumental architecture to bury their dead. Consequently, the reason for this variability may be sought in cultural choices on the basis of anthropological and archaeological data, in order to define whether these two funerary rites result from distinct groups sharing the same territory or reflect a different social status within the same community.

1. Distribution of sites by geographical area and type of structure.

1. Distribution of sites by geographical area and type of structure.

The numbers refer to Table 1

Sample

2In the area of study (fig. 1), the discoveries for the greater part were made between the 1970s and the 1990s and so far have not been subjected to an in-depth analysis. Yet these “forgotten” collections are an easily accessible source of information. However, their analyses are delicate because most of the collections reveal gaps of varying importance, with regard to field documentation or data recording. However, keeping these biases in mind and measuring their impact on the results of the various studies, it is possible to discuss funerary practices and the biology of the individuals from these sites, and to consider overviews on a regional scale (Linard et al. 2020, Le Roy et al. submitted).

3The sample analysed here is the result of resumed fieldwork and of the study of ancient collections carried out since 2012 in the Hérault department, the southern part of the Ardèche department and the northern part of the Gard department. The two defined study windows make it possible to analyse data at different scales (structure, site, region) and to make a comparison between the Montpellier valley (zone A) and the foothills of the Cévennes (zone B), regions that have yielded a significant number of burial sites. The sample considered in this study is composed of ten variant megalithic structures, ranging from simple dolmens (Abrits 1 and 2) to more complex architectures (les Isserts; Bec Drelon et al. 2016) and of ten cavities, some of which exhibit internal features. These sites are distributed over the two study windows (fig. 1, table 1). As the available data were poor, the study of the sample was based on a dichotomous approach and the differences discussed merely led us to consider the study sample dichotomously and therefore to discuss the differences only at the scale of dolmens and cavities in the broad sense.

Tab. 1. List of the sites by commune providing geographical, archaeological and chronological data.

Tab. 1. List of the sites by commune providing geographical, archaeological and chronological data.

The numbers refer to the map in Figure 1.

4The same anthropological study protocol was applied to all collections. Based on the estimation of the minimum number of individuals (MNI; Poplin 1976, Masset 1984, Demangeot 2008) and of age at death (Moorrees et al. 1963a,1963b, Schmitt 2005) as well as on the determination of sex (Bruzek 2002, Murail et al., 2005, Bruzek et al. 2017), the funerary selection of individuals deposited in the collective graves was analysed. Lastly, the assessment of the health status of the various osteological assemblages is based on the examination of bone and dental remains (Brothwell 1981, Smith 1984, Bocquentin 2003), in order to biologically characterise each burial group, to define the composition of the buried population and to highlight possible differences according to the geography or the burial location. The scarcity of studies of grave goods in these archaeological contexts is significant. For this reason, only ceramic data were considered for discussion. Thus, analyses of grave goods provide information at different levels, on the one hand in relationship to the temporal and cultural context(s) into which the funerary complex fits and on the other hand in relationship to the deceased and the organisation of the funerary area.

Results

5Thus, it was possible to highlight the great interest involved in a review of ancient excavations, as regards both the collections kept in museum archives and the sites in situ. Indeed, as the research themes and the methods have evolved since the discovery of these sites, a large-scale review is necessary in order to fully understand and interpret these complex funerary deposits.

6Keeping in mind the inherent limitations related to such studies, we were able to examine the funerary selection from a different point of view, highlighting differences at the scale of the site or the region and not of the structure alone. Indeed, comparisons with ethnoarchaeological studies reflected the complexity of these structures and the high variability of the composition of the populations buried therein. It was possible to highlight a recurrent exclusion of the youngest individuals ([<5 yrs]) from the burial sites, which is quite systematic in the Montpellier valley, and which shows a more diverse pattern in the hill forts of the Cévennes. For the latter region, a potential organisation at the site level (megalith “necropolis” of Gabiane) or the micro-region (Cèze gorges) could be demonstrated.

7The assessment of the health status of these human groups shed light on disabling pathological cases, questioning the care provided to diseased people, both during their lifetime and in death. In addition, new, unpublished data emerged with regard to possible craft activities (basketry and / or tannery) carried out by different human groups. No significant differences could be highlighted as regards the periods of use, the management of body deposits and biological characteristics of the different types of sites. Only the presence of para-masticatory wear related to distinct activities evidenced in populations buried in dolmens suggests a potential selection that is impossible for us to define now. This result could mean that the populations buried in the dolmens practiced crafts, unlike the societies burying their dead in cavities. The lack of data in nearby settlement sites limits this discussion. In addition, the presence of individuals with no evidence of para-masticatory wear makes it possible to exclude a selection of individuals correlated with their economic activity within the group, in both caves and dolmens. Thus, we are apparently dealing with two cultural groups, sharing a small territory in the southern part of the Ardèche department and the northern part of the Gard department.

8The study of pottery remains enabled a better understanding of the burial sites thanks to a more precise typological dating, but also by advancing new hypotheses as to the nature of the frequentation, in particular for the megalithic monuments. In fact, the Isserts dolmen made it possible to identify two distinct phases of use by successive human groups which did not occupy the same spaces within the same site. Thus the nature of these occupations can be questioned, one being funerary, the second purely ritual.

9Finally, and this is perhaps the major contribution of these studies here, it was possible to highlight, both in a cavity (Aven Janna, Gard department) and in a megalithic monument (Abrits 2), a preparation of the floor preceding the deposit of the dead. While the architectural function of the Abrits 2 dolmen is obvious, a role in the funerary “operational sequence” contributing to the management of bodies can be assumed. A parallel can be drawn with the sherd bed unearthed at Aven Janna. If the architectural aspect still needs to be demonstrated, the establishment of this archaeological level is clearly due to the management of the body deposition in the funerary area.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

Adams 2007, ADAMS R.L., The Megalithic Tradition of West-Sumba, Indonesia: an Ethnoarchaeological Investigation of Megalith Construction, Vancouver, Simon Fraser University, 2007, PhD Dissertation, 522 p.

Arnal 1956, ARNAL J., Petit lexique du mégalithisme, Bulletin de la Société préhistorique française, 1956, 53, 9, p. 518-531.

Arnal 1959, ARNAL J., Les dolmens à façade, Bulletin de la Société d'Études scientifiques d'Angers (n.s.), 1959, 89, 2, p. 51-53.

Balty & Caron 2012, BALTY I., CARON V., Risques biologiques et chimiques encourus par les fossoyeurs, Références en santé au travail, 2012, 130, p. 25-39.

Bec Drelon et al. 2013, BEC DRELON N., LE ROY M., RECCHIA J., VAQUER J., THIRAULT E. Eds., Le Dolmen des Isserts (Saint-Jean-de-la-Blaquière, Hérault), Aix-en-Provence / Montpellier, LAMPEA UMR7269 / DRAC PACA / DRAC Occitanie - Service régional de l'archéologie, 2013 (Rapport final d’opération).

Bec Drelon et al. 2014, BEC DRELON N., LE ROY M., RECCHIA J., « Autour de la chambre» : nouveaux éléments de réflexion sur les structures tumulaires : apport des fouilles récentes de cinq dolmens de l'Hérault, in: Chronologie de la préhistoire récente dans le sud de la France : acquis 1992-2012 - actualité de la recherche : actes des 10e Rencontres méridionales de Préhistoire récente, Porticcio (20) - 18 au 20 octobre 2012, Sénépart I., Leandri F., Cauliez J. et al. (dir.), Toulouse, Archives d'Ecologie préhistorique, 2014, p. 569-582.

Bec Drelon 2015, BEC DRELON N., Autour du coffre: dispositifs et aménagements des monuments funéraires mégalithiques en Languedoc et en Roussillon (IVe/IIe millénaires), Aix-Marseille Université, 2015, Thèse de Doctorat - Préhistoire, 2 vol., 202 + 477 p.

Bec Drelon et al. 2016, BEC DRELON N., LE ROY M., RECCHIA J., Le dolmen des Isserts (Saint-Jean-de-la-Blaquière, 34): implantation territoriale, évolution de l’architecture tumulaire et différenciation des espaces internes, in: De la tombe au territoire & actualités de la recherche : actes des 11èmes Rencontres Méridionales de Préhistoire Récente, Montpellier (25 au 27 septembre 2014), Cauliez J., Sénépart I., Jallot L. et al. (dir.), Toulouse, Archives d'Ecologie préhistorique, 2016, p. 67-85.

Bérard 2020, BÉRARD R.-M., Une autre façon de mourir ? Retour sur les pratiques funéraires de Mégara Nisaea et Mégara Hyblaea, in: Une autre façon d’être Grec : interactions et productions des Grecs en milieu colonial, Dana M., Costanzi M. (dir.), Leuven, Peeters, 2020, p. 333-350 (Colloquia Antica).

Blin 2015, BLIN A., Mortuary Practices as Evidence of Social Organization in the Neolithic Hypogea of the Paris Basin, European Journal of Archaeology, 2015, 18, 4, p. 580-598.

Blin 2018, BLIN A., Les allées sépulcrales du Bassin parisien à la fin du Néolithique: l'exemple de La Chaussée-Tirancourt, Paris, CNRS Editions, 2018, 176 p. (Gallia Préhistoire. Supplément ; 42).

Bloch 1971, BLOCH M., Placing the dead: tombs, ancestral villages and kinship organization in Madagascar, London, Seminar Press, 1971, 241 p. (Seminar studies in anthropology ; 1).

Bocquentin 2003, BOCQUENTIN F., Pratiques funéraires, paramètres biologiques et identités culturelles au Natoufien : une analyse archéo-anthropologique, Université Bordeaux I, 2003, Thèse de Doctorat, 631 p.

Bouffiès et al. 2017, BOUFFIÈS C., LE ROY M., TCHÉRÉMISSINOFF Y., GROS O., GROS A.-C., Étude anthropologique et spatiale du dolmen des Abrits n°2 à Beaulieu : recrutement funéraire et modalités de gestion d'une sépulture collective du Néolithique final, Ardèche Archéologie, 2017, 34, p. 31-39.

Boulestin 2019, BOULESTIN B., Faut-il en finir avec la sépulture collective (et sinon qu'en faire) ?, Bulletin de la Société préhistorique française, 2019, 116, 4, p. 705-723.

Brabant 1969, BRABANT H., Observations sur les dents des populations mégalithiques d’Europe Occidentale, Bulletin du Groupement International pour la Recherche Scientifique en Stomatologie, 1969, 12, p. 429-460.

Brothwell 1981, BROTHWELL D.R., Digging up bones : the excavation, treatment, and study of human skeletal remains, Third edition, Ithaca, Cornell University Press, 1981, 208 p.

Brůžek 2002, BRŮŽEK J., A method for visual determination of sex using the human hip bone, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2002, 117, 2, p. 157-168.

Brůžek et al. 2017, BRŮŽEK J., SANTOS F., DUTAILLY B., MURAIL P., CUNHA E., Validation and reliability of the sex estimation of the human os coxae using freely available DSP2 software for bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2017, 164, 2, p. 440-449.

Buchet & Séguy 2002, BUCHET L., SÉGUY I., La paléodémographie: bilan et perspectives, Annales de démographie historique, 2002, 1, p. 161-212.

Chambon 2003, CHAMBON P., Les morts dans les sépultures collectives néolithiques en France : du cadavre aux restes ultimes, Paris, Editions du CNRS, 2003, 395 p. (Gallia Préhistoire. Supplément ; 35).

Clop Garcia et al. soumis, CLOP GARCIA X., MAJÓ T., BEC DRELON N., LE ROY M., SCHMITT A., Typologies des sépultures collectives et chronométrie. Les sites funéraires du IVe- IIe millénaire avant notre ère du bassin nord occidental de la Méditerranée, in: Actes de la 11ème Rencontre du GAAF "Typochronologie des tombes à inhumation de la préhistoire à nos jours", Tours 2019, Groupe d'Anthropologie et d'Archéologie funéraires, soumis.

Decary 1962, DECARY R., La mort et les coutumes funéraires à Madagascar, Paris, Maisonneuve & Larose, 1962, 306 p.

Delattre 2018, DELATTRE V., Handicap : quand l'archéologie nous éclaire, Paris, Le Pommier, 2018, 233 p. (Le Collège ; 29).

Demangeot 2008, DEMANGEOT C., Le dénombrement des défunts dans les ensembles funéraires : problèmes théoriques, paramètres quantitatifs : application à la sépulture collective du dolmen des Peirières à Villedubert (Aude, France), Université Bordeaux I, 2008, Thèse de Doctorat : Anthropologie biologique, 794 p.

Duday 1976, DUDAY H., La population de la France méditerranéenne dans le Languedoc et le Roussillon, in: La Préhistoire française. Tome II : Les civilisations néolithiques et protohistoriques de la France, Guilaine J. (dir.), Paris, Editions du CNRS, 1976, p. 129-134.

Gros & Gros 2010, GROS O., GROS A.-C., Un monument mégalithique exceptionnel en Bas-Vivarais : le dolmen n°2 des "Abrits" à Beaulieu, Grou Peïro : Les Nouveaux Cahiers du Grospierrois, 2010, 7, p. 14-22.

Guilaine 1998, GUILAINE J. Ed., Sépultures d'Occident et genèse des mégalithismes (9000-3500 avant notre ère), Paris, Errance, 1998, 206 p. (Collection des Hespérides).

Hershkovitz et al. 2002, HERSHKOVITZ I., GREENWALD C.M., LATIMER B.M., JELLEMA L.M., WISH-BARATZ S., ESHED V., DUTOUR O., ROTHSCHILD B.M., Serpens endocrania symmetrica (SES): a new term and a possible clue for identifying intrathoracic disease in skeletal populations, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2002, 118, 3, p. 201-216.

Jallot & Gutherz 2014, JALLOT L., GUTHERZ X., Le Néolithique final en Languedoc oriental et ses marges : 20 ans après Ambérieu-en-Bugey, in: Chronologie de la préhistoire récente dans le sud de la France : acquis 1992-2012 - actualité de la recherche : actes des 10e Rencontres méridionales de Préhistoire récente, Porticcio (20) - 18 au 20 octobre 2012, Sénépart I., Leandri F., Cauliez J. et al. (dir.), Toulouse, Archives d'Ecologie préhistorique, 2014, p. 137-158.

Jean et al. 2019, JEAN N., LE ROY M., DURAND V., GÉLY B., LEMERCIER O., Étude anthropologique du dolmen du Pala 2, Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt, 2019, 49, 2, p. 183-195.

Jeunesse & Denaire 2018, JEUNESSE C., DENAIRE A., Current collective graves in the Austronesian world: a few remarks about Sumba and Sulawesi (Indonesia), in: Gathered in Death : Archaeological and Ethnological Perspectives on Collective Burial and Social Organisation, Schmitt A., Déderix S., Crevecoeur I. (dir.), Louvain, Presses universitaires de Louvain, 2018, p. 85-105 (Aegis ; 14).

Lachenal 2014, LACHENAL T., Chronologie de l'âge du Bronze en Provence, in: Chronologie de la préhistoire récente dans le sud de la France : acquis 1992-2012 - actualité de la recherche : actes des 10e Rencontres méridionales de Préhistoire récente, Porticcio (20) - 18 au 20 octobre 2012, Sénépart I., Leandri F., Cauliez J. et al. (dir.), Toulouse, Archives d'Ecologie préhistorique, 2014, p. 197-220.

Laforgue & Robert 1975, LAFORGUE M., ROBERT J., Les fouilles du tumulus de Gabiane 3 (fin), Bulletin annuel de la Société d'études et de Recherches Archéologiques et Historiques de Vagnas (Ardèche). Archéologie préhistorique et médiévale, 1975, 9, p. 16-18.

Le Roy et al. 2014, LE ROY M., ROTTIER S., BECDELIÈVRE C. de, THIOL S., COUTELIER C., TILLIER A.-M., Funerary behaviour of Neolithic necropolises and collective graves in France. Evidence from Gurgy ‘Les Noisats’ (middle Neolithic) and Passy/ Véron ‘La Truie Pendue’ (Late Neolithic), Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt, 2014, 44, 3, p. 337-351.

Le Roy 2015, LE ROY M., Les enfants au Néolithique : du contexte funéraire à l’interprétation socioculturelle en France de 5700 à 2100 ans av. J.-C , Université de Bordeaux, 2015, Thèse de Doctorat : Anthropologie biologique, 611 p.

Le Roy & Bec Drelon 2016, LE ROY M., BEC DRELON N., Le dolmen des Isserts (Saint-Jean-de-la-Blaquière, 34) : étude anthropologique et considérations ethno-archéologiques, in: De la tombe au territoire & actualités de la recherche : actes des 11èmes Rencontres Méridionales de Préhistoire Récente, Montpellier (25 au 27 septembre 2014), Cauliez J., Sénépart I., Jallot L. et al. (dir.), Toulouse, Archives d'Ecologie préhistorique, 2016, p. 443-451.

Le Roy 2018, LE ROY M., Reprise de la fouille du dolmen des Abrits 2 (Beaulieu) : Résultats anciens et préliminaires, Grou Peïro : Les Nouveaux Cahiers du Grospierrois, 2018, 9, p. 23-29.

Le Roy 2018, LE ROY M., « Des dents-outils ». Étude préliminaire des restes humains de la population du Néolithique final du dolmen de Gabiane 6 (Labeaume), Ardèche Archéologie, 2018, 35, p. 12-18.

Le Roy et al. 2018, LE ROY M., ROTTIER S., SANTOS F., TILLIER A.-M., Funerary Treatment of Immature Deceased in Neolithic Collective Burial Sites in France. Were Children Buried with Adults?, in: Across the Generations: The Old and the Young in Past Societies : Proceedings from the 22nd Annual Meeting of the EAA in Vilnius, Lithuania, 31st August – 4th September 2016, Lillehammer G., Murphy E.M. (dir.), Stavanger, Arkeologisk museum - Universitetet i Stavange, 2018, p. 21-34 (AmS-Skrifter ; 26 / Childhood in the Past. Monograph Series ; 8).

Le Roy et al. 2018, LE ROY M., ROTTIER S., TILLIER A.-M., Who was a ‘Child’ During the Neolithic in France?, Childhood in the Past, 2018, 11, 2, p. 69-84.

Le Roy et al. 2019, LE ROY M., BECDELIÈVRE) C. de, ROTTIER S., THIOL S., De feu et d'os : la sépulture collective néolithique de la Truie Pendue (Passy-Veron, Yonne) Application SIG, in: Renouvellement des outils informatiques pour l’enregistrement et l’étude des sépultures collectives. Échanges méthodologiques, Tchérémissinoff Y., Schmitt A. (dir.), Aix-en-Provence, Association pour la promotion de la préhistoire et de l'anthropologie méditerranéennes, 2019, [en ligne] https://journals.openedition.org/pm/1793 (Préhistoires méditerranéennes ; 7).

Le Roy & Seikowski 2019, LE ROY M., SEIKOWSKI J., Der Aven Janna bei Saint-Privat-de-Champclos (Département Gard, Frankreich), eine bedeutende archäologische Fundstätte, Mitteilungen des Verbandes der Deutschen Höhlen- und Karstforscher, 2019, 65, 1-2, p. 28-31.

Le Roy et al. soumis, LE ROY M., BOUFFIÈS C., JEAN N., LINARD D., Bilan de reprises d’études de collections anciennes en Ardèche et Nord du Gard : les sépultures collectives de la fin du Néolithique / début Age du Bronze, in: Actes des 3èmes Ie Rencontres Nord/Sud de Préhistoire récente "(Im)mobiles ? Circulation, échanges des objets et des idées, mobilités, stabilités des personnes et des groupes durant la Pré- et Protohistoire en Europe occidentale", Lyon 2018, soumis.

Le Roy sous presse, LE ROY M., Le traitement funéraire des malades dans les sépultures collectives de la fin du Néolithique. Réflexions autour de quelques exemples choisis du Sud de la France, in: Actes de la Rencontre autour du corps malade : prise en charge et traitement funéraire des individus souffrants à travers les siècles, Bordeaux 2018, Kacki S., Réveillas H., Knüsel C.J. (dir.), sous presse.

Leclerc & Tarrête 1988, LECLERC J., TARRÊTE J., Sépulture, in: Dictionnaire de la Préhistoire, Leroi-Gourhan A. (dir.), Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, 1988, p. 963-964.

Ledermann 1969, LEDERMANN S., Nouvelles tables types de mortalité, Paris, Presses universitaires de France, 1969, 260 p.

Lemercier 2007, LEMERCIER O., La fin du Néolithique dans le Sud-Est de la France : concepts techniques, culturels et chronologiques de 1954 à 2004, in: Un siècle de construction du discours scientifique en préhistoire. Volume I, Evin J. (dir.), Paris, Société préhistorique française, 2007, p. 485-500 (Congrès du Centenaire de la S.P.F., Avignon 2004).

Lewis 2004, LEWIS M.E., Endocranial lesions in non-adult skeletons: understanding their aetiology, International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, 2004, 14, 2, p. 82-97.

Lewis 2017, LEWIS M., Paleopathology of children: Identification of pathological conditions in the human skeletal remains of non-adults, London, Academic Press, 2017, 288 p.

Linard et al. 2020, LINARD D., LE ROY M., COURTAUD P., Étude archéo-anthropologique de sept cavités sépulcrales de la région d'Alès (Gard) datées du Néolithique final et/ou Age du bronze, Ardèche Archéologie, 2020, 37, p. 36-49.

Masset 1984, MASSET C., Le dénombrement dans les sépultures collectives, Garcia de Orta - Serie de Antropobiologia, 1984, 3, p. 149-152.

Moorrees et al. 1963, MOORREES C.F.A., FANNING E.A., HUNT E.E., Formation and resorption of three deciduous teeth in children, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1963, 21, p. 205-213.

Moorrees et al. 1963, MOORREES C.F.A., FANNING E.A., HUNT E.E., Age Variation of Formation Stages for Ten Permanent Teeth, Journal of Dental Research, 1963, 42, 6, p. 1490-1502.

Murail et al. 2005, MURAIL P., BRUZEK J., HOUËT F., CUNHA E., DSP : a tool for probabilistic sex diagnosis using worldwide variability in hip-bone measurements, Bulletins et Mémoires de la Société d'Anthropologie de Paris, 2005, 17, 3-4, p. 167-176.

Murphy 1996, MURPHY E.M., A possible case of hydrocephalus in a medieval child from Doonbought Fort, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, 1996, 6, 5, p. 435-442.

Parker Pearson & Regnier 2018, PARKER PEARSON M., REGNIER D., Collective and single burial in Madagascar, in: Gathered in Death : Archaeological and Ethnological Perspectives on Collective Burial and Social Organisation, Schmitt A., Déderix S., Crevecoeur I. (dir.), Louvain, Presses universitaires de Louvain, 2018, p. 41-62 (Aegis ; 14).

Peineitti et al. in preparation, PEINEITTI A., LE ROY M., WATTEZ J., New insights about the megalithic construction from micromorphology, Journal of Field Archaeology, in preparation.

Poplin 1976, POPLIN F., A propos du nombre de restes et du nombre d’individus dans les échantillons d’ossements, Cahiers du Centre de Recherches préhistoriques, 1976, 5, p. 61-74.

Porqueddu 2019, PORQUEDDU M.-E., De l’outil à la représentation du collectif ? Le dépôt du macro-outillage de creusement dans les cavités artificielles funéraires au Néolithique, Techniques & Culture, 2019, 70, [en ligne] http://journals.openedition.org/tc/10786.

Provost et al. 2017, PROVOST S., BINDER D., DUDAY H., DURRENMATH G., GOUDE G., GOURICHON L., DELHON C., GENTILE I., VUILLIEN M., ZEMOUR A., Une sépulture collective à la transition des VIe et Ve millénaires BCE : Mougins – Les Bréguières (Alpes-Maritimes, France). Fouilles Maurice Sechter 1966-1967, Gallia Préhistoire, 2017, 57, p. 289-336.

R Team 2013, R TEAM, R : A language and environment for statistical computing, Vienna, R Foundation for Statistical Computing, 2013, {en ligne] http://www.R-project.org

Ravy et al. 1996, RAVY E., CLÈRE J., PUECH P.-F., Traces d'activité humaines sur les dents du Chalcolithique ardéchois, L'Anthropologie (Paris), 1996, 100, 4, p. 574-588.

Rivière 2006, RIVIÈRE A.-L., Le Dolmen de la Planquette (Joncels) : Résultats du sondage 2005, Bulletin de la Société archéologique et historique des hauts cantons de l'Hérault, 2006, 29, p. 7-12.

Sauzade et al. 2018, SAUZADE G., BIZOT B., SCHMITT A., La chronologie des ensembles funéraires du Néolithique final provençal. Proposition de sériation intégrant les contextes d’habitat, Préhistoires méditerranéennes, 2018, 6, mis en ligne le 21 décembre 2018, [en ligne] http://journals.openedition.org/pm/1566

Schmitt 2005, SCHMITT A., Une nouvelle méthode pour estimer l’âge au décès des adultes à partir de la surface sacro-pelvienne iliaque, Bulletins et Mémoires de la Société d'Anthropologie de Paris, 2005, 17, 1-2, p. 89-101.

Schmitt & Déderix 2019, SCHMITT A., DÉDERIX S., Qu’est-ce qu’une sépulture collective ? Vers un changement de paradigme, Bulletins et Mémoires de la Société d'Anthropologie de Paris, 2019, 31, 3-4, p. 103-112.

Sellier 1996, SELLIER P., La mise en évidence d’anomalies démographiques et leur interprétation : population, recrutement et pratiques funéraires du tumulus de Courtesoult, in: Nécropoles et société au premier âge du Fer. Le tumulus de Courtesoult (Haute-Saône), Piningre J.-F. (dir.), Paris, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, 1996, p. 118-202 (Documents d'archéologie française ; 54).

Sellier & Bendezu Sarmiento 2013, SELLIER P., BENDEZU SARMIENTO J., Différer la décomposition : le temps suspendu ? Les signes d'une momification préalable, Nouvelles de l'Archéologie, 2013, 132 "Une archéologie des temps funéraires ? Hommage à Jean Leclerc", p. 30-36.

Sévin-Allouet & Scarre 2013, SÉVIN-ALLOUET C., SCARRE C., Les sépultures collectives de Grande-Bretagne : temporalité et mémoire sociale, in: Transitions, ruptures et continuité en Préhistoire : [Volume 1 : Évolution des techniques - Comportements funéraires - Néolithique ancien], Jaubert J., Fourment N., Depaepe P. (dir.), Paris, Société préhistorique française, 2013, p. 229-242 (Congrès préhistorique de France. Compte Rendu de la 27ème Session, Bordeaux 2010 [Session B]).

Smith 1984, SMITH B.H., Patterns of Molar Wear in Hunter-Gatherers and Agriculturalists, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1984, 63, p. 39-56.

Sohn & Vaquer 2012, SOHN M., VAQUER J. Eds., Sépultures collectives et mobiliers funéraires de la fin du Néolithique en Europe occidentale : Actes de la table ronde [...] "La fin du Néolithique en Europe de l'Ouest. Valeurs sociales et identitaires des dotations funéraires (3500 / 2000 av. n.è.)", Toulouse, Archives d'Ecologie Préhistorique, 2012, 381 p.

Steimer-Herbet 2018, STEIMER-HERBET T., Indonesian megaliths: a forgotten cultural heritage, Oxford, Archaeopress, 2018, 118 p. (Archaeopress Archaeology).

Valentin et al. 2014, VALENTIN F., RIVOAL I., THEVENET C., SELLIER P. Eds., La chaîne opératoire funéraire : ethnologie et archéologie de la mort, Paris, De Boccard, 2014, 50 p. (Travaux de la Maison de l'Archéologie et de l'Ethnologie ; 18).

Wheatley et al. 2010, WHEATLEY D.W., GARCÍA SANJUAN L., MURRIETA FLORES P.A., MÁRQUEZ PÉREZ J., Approaching the landscape dimension of the megalithic phenomenon in southern Spain, Oxford Journal of Archaeology, 2010, 29, 4, p. 387-405.

Haut de page

Table des illustrations

Titre 1. Distribution of sites by geographical area and type of structure.
Légende The numbers refer to Table 1
URL http://journals.openedition.org/pm/docannexe/image/3000/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 1,3M
Titre Tab. 1. List of the sites by commune providing geographical, archaeological and chronological data.
Légende The numbers refer to the map in Figure 1.
URL http://journals.openedition.org/pm/docannexe/image/3000/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 3,3M
Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Mélie Le Roy et Johanna Recchia-Quiniou, « Multidisciplinary approach to collective burials in caves and in dolmens at the end of the Neolithic period in Eastern Languedoc and the southern part of the Cévennes—abridged version »Préhistoires Méditerranéennes, 9.2 | -1, 97-118.

Référence électronique

Mélie Le Roy et Johanna Recchia-Quiniou, « Multidisciplinary approach to collective burials in caves and in dolmens at the end of the Neolithic period in Eastern Languedoc and the southern part of the Cévennes—abridged version »Préhistoires Méditerranéennes [En ligne], 9.2 | 2021, mis en ligne le 07 décembre 2021, consulté le 26 septembre 2022. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/pm/3000 ; DOI : https://doi.org/10.4000/pm.3000

Haut de page

Auteurs

Mélie Le Roy

melieleroy@hotmail.fr
Archaeology &Palaeoecology, School of Natural and Built Environment, Queen's University Belfast Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland

Articles du même auteur

Johanna Recchia-Quiniou

recchiajohanna@yahoo.fr
Paleotime et UMR 5140 – ASM, Université Paul Valery

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

Tous droits réservés

Haut de page
Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search