Skip to navigation – Site map

Industrial change, financial system and coherent industrial policy

Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory
p. 207-226

Abstracts

The debate on the relationship between the financial and the non-financial sectors of the economy is an old one. Schumpeter (1911) argued that an efficient and effective financial system has a positive impact on economic growth. Recently this debate has experienced renewed interest after the financial crisis, which revealed the extraordinary growth of the financial sector over recent decades, the increasing gap between the financial and the real sectors of the economy, and the so-called financialization of enterprises. In fact, the financial sector grew so big and has made such high profits that it is legitimate to ask whether it impeded non-financial structural change as a result, by drawing away not only money, but also human capital from the real sector, since many engineers preferred working in the financial sector to get higher wages than in industry. Meanwhile industries have experienced substantial structural changes that have induced new calls for industrial policies at the beginning of the 2000s, and led to a “return” of industrial policy. The aim of this paper is to discuss both the effects of financialization on the industrial sector and the implications for the design of sustainable industrial policies. The conclusions are that industrial policy should include actions aimed at inducing the financial sector to focus on providing resources to investments in productive sectors and reduce speculative activities. Financial and macroeconomic policies must indeed be coherent with industrial policy so that all parts of the economic system combine to contribute to a move toward sustainable development paths.

Top of page

Excerpt

Cairn

Full-text article available to subscribers or on a "pay per view" basis. It will be available on this URL in January 2020.
Read it

Outline

1. Introduction
2. Evidence on the exaggerated growth of the financial sector
3. Consequences for the real sector
4. New industrial policies at the turn of the century
5. Concluding remarks

First lines

1. Introduction

The debate on the relationship between the financial and the non-financial sectors of the economy is an old one. Schumpeter (1911) argued that an efficient and effective financial system has a positive impact on economic growth. Keynes (1930) argued in favour of the importance of the banking sector for economic growth. He suggested that bank credit “is the pavement along which production travels, and the bankers if they knew their duty, would provide the transport facilities to just the extent that is required in order that the productive powers of the community can be employed at their full capacity” (1930, II, p. 220). Keynes (1936) subsequently argued in favour of government control over investment. Robinson claimed that “where enterprise leads, finance follows” (1952, p. 86), so that financial development follows growth.

Recently this debate has experienced renewed interest after the financial crisis, which revealed the extraordinary growth of the financial sector ...

Top of page

References

Bibliographical reference

Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory, « Industrial change, financial system and coherent industrial policy », Revue d'économie industrielle, 154 | 2016, 207-226.

Electronic reference

Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory, « Industrial change, financial system and coherent industrial policy », Revue d'économie industrielle [Online], 154 | 2e trimestre 2016, Online since 15 June 2018, connection on 21 June 2018. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/rei/6386 ; DOI : 10.4000/rei.6386

Top of page

About the authors

Patrizio Bianchi

Department of Economics and Management, University of Ferrara

By this author

Sandrine Labory

Department of Economics and Management, University of Ferrara

By this author

Top of page

Copyright

© Revue d’économie industrielle

Top of page