Skip to navigation – Site map

Home

  • ENS Éditions
  • ENS de Lyon

Présentation

Tracés: Revue de Sciences Humaines publishes research in the social sciences in two themed issues per year and a handful of special editions. These issues focus on an old debate that has taken a new turn due to current editorial or political circumstances, takes an idea that the various intellectual traditions and disciplines would usually address in isolation and submits it to examination from multiple perspectives, or explores an emerging field of thought. Tracés claims a true pluralism, as attested to by the variety of themes and approaches it publishes. The journal’s editorial committee is made up of young researchers from various disciplines and pursues a strong interdisciplinary project. This is manifested in the selection of articles, notes, translations, and interviews that make up each of the issues.
Journal supported by the Institut des Sciences Humaines et Sociales (CNRS).

Latest issue
39/2020
Documenter l’université qui lutte

Documenting the struggling university
Edited by Camille Noûs

2020 was a special year in many ways: Covid-19, but also the strong mobilization against the Research Programming Law in France, including within humanities and social science journals, many of which have positioned themselves in the fight. Tracés, like other journals, declared itself on strike and then resumed its activities during a spring like no other... It is under these conditions that the idea was adopted to turn our calendar upside down, to change the theme planned for this issue.

It was important for us to make a mobilized issue that would report on what happened during this unusual year. And since it was not possible in this temporality to produce articles as we usually did, the challenge became precisely to think and to take a step aside in relation to our ways of doing things, and in relation to the very contents that are ours.

Documenting is also taking this step aside as a way of refusing a race for excellence that requires us to produce more and faster, and in an increasingly global and complex evaluation system. More than a self-criticism, this issue suggests repositioning ourselves within a scientific temporal process in a necessary and salutary slowness, and thus paying more attention to the subject of human and social sciences, as well as to the making of its writings.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search